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eBook Seeing Calvin Coolidge in a Dream: A Novel download

by John Derbyshire

eBook Seeing Calvin Coolidge in a Dream: A Novel download ISBN: 0312156499
Author: John Derbyshire
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; 1st St. Martin's Griffin Ed edition (July 15, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1127 kb
Fb2: 1167 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: mbr azw lrf lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

from the book 'Seeing Calvin Coolidge in a Dream: A Novel' page 27.

and he's back to Ding, doing the right.

I am the Boris in John Derbyshire's brilliant first novel. A few really worthwhile twists in the story line. I have had the priviledge of having Mr. Derbyshire work in my Department at a Wall Street firm allowing him to write his novel at the office.

Derbyshire once argued that America would be better off if women did not have the right to vote.

His columns cover a broad range of political-cultural topics, including immigration, China, history, mathematics, and race. Derbyshire's 1996 novel Seeing Calvin Coolidge in a Dream was a New York Times "Notable Book of the Year"  . Derbyshire once argued that America would be better off if women did not have the right to vote. In 2005, in a monthly column containing a series of miscellaneous musings, he controversially stated that women's physical attractiveness peaks between ages 15 and 2. .

Coolidge, Calvin, 1872-1933. New York : St. Martin's Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

John Derbyshire took an interesting risk with this first-person novel written in the voice of Chai, a former Red Guard from Northeastern China . If only China had Calvin Coolidge in their history. com User, August 3, 2001. This one really has to be read on trust.

John Derbyshire took an interesting risk with this first-person novel written in the voice of Chai, a former Red Guard from Northeastern China who fled hi.

My novel Seeing Calvin Coolidge in a Dream appeared in Spring of 1996 in hardback (upper image at left), in October . It explains well enough, I hope, what the 30th President is doing in a book about 1990s Chinese immigrants.

My novel Seeing Calvin Coolidge in a Dream appeared in Spring of 1996 in hardback (upper image at left), in October that year in paperback (lower image). The novel is a domestic comedy on the theme - well tried by previous writers (W. Shakespeare, J. Austen, A. Trollope et. - of a rather vain and foolish man being outwitted by a cunning woman.

Seeing Calvin Coolidge in a Dream is a 1996 book by John Derbyshire. Category:1996 novels Category:Novels set in New York (state) Category:Cultural depictions of Calvin Coolidge Category:Novels about dreams.

SEEING CALVIN COOLIDGE IN A DREAM By John Derbyshire

SEEING CALVIN COOLIDGE IN A DREAM By John Derbyshire. 273 pp. New York: St.

His novel, "Seeing Calvin Coolidge in a Dream", was a New York Times "notable Book" in 2006. Mr Derbyshire: In my book I mention Andrei Amalrik's 1969 essay (later a book) "Will the Soviet Union Survive Until 1984?" He was looking forward 15 years. He has also authored or co-authored four non-fiction works, the latest of which is "We Are Doomed: Reclaiming Conservative Pessimism", which is due out in September.

This is a magical novel of a Chinese immigrant's coming to terms with himself, his marriage, and America--and the unlikely moral force that guides his life.Chai is middle-aged, a disillusioned formed Red Guard who escaped China for Hong Kong and then America, where he works in New York as a banker. He and his wife, Ding, are the parents of an infant and enjoy a contented marriage; he develops a fond obsession with President Calvin Coolidge, the taciturn New Englander whose wry wit and wisdom delights Chai. One day, a chance discovery leads him astray: He learns that a lover from his youth is now in Boston, living with her husband and their son. The son is Chai's very image, and the staid banker is inflamed by the implications of the resemblance. Confused by his emotions, he becomes determined to revive the affair. How Ding schemes to win back her wayward husband--and teach him the necessary truths about love--forms the plot and beguiling conclusion to John Derbyshire's tale.
Comments: (7)
Thundershaper
Derbyshire is one of my favorite bloggers and while I have read many of his views on politics and learned a great deal from him over the years, I hadn't realized how good he could be at putting these views into a light-hearted and engaging novel. The main character, a Chinese American immigrant, is a pure delight, as is the adventure he finds himself in as he toys with the idea of re-kindling an old flame. I recommend that everyone read this book.
Anicasalar
I am the Boris in John Derbyshire's brilliant first novel. I have had the priviledge of having Mr. Derbyshire work in my Department at a Wall Street firm allowing him to write his novel at the office. What has John done? He has put together a masterful novel of a Chinese immigrant who comes to this country with his Chinese wife and as many of us do, fantasizes about a former girlfriend who has also immigrated to this country. Unlike many of us husbands, he visits her. He then weaves in the 30th president of the United States who helps preserve his marriage. It should be noted that Mr. Derbyshire is English, went to China to teach and fell in love with and married one of his students. He does have a genuine fondness for Mr. Coolidge. We have debated to what extent the book is autobiographical, which he vehemetly denies although his wife hates the book. So be it. If you want a good, thoughtful read, try this acclaimed book.
Samutilar
John Derbyshire is a very bright guy who has the kind of dry humor only the Brits do this well. He needed advice on the title, however. It's not one that would see books fly off the shelves.
Ginaun
A very clever novel by and English American who taught in China, married into that culture, and clearly learned it very well. Would that all Americans, native or immigrant, have the admiration for Calvin Coolidge that the author and his narrator share.
Thofyn
Derbyshire is a great writer; and this novel is no exception. I wish he did more fiction! With the renewed popularity of Coolidge, this work should draw renewed interest. You want to reach into the book and smack Chai during most of his struggle - but it makes for a great journey.
Goldfury
I love this writer's voice. The book is thoughtful and entertaining. It's also a good length, so you won't have to schedule your life around it to finish the story in a reasonable time.
cyrexoff
Writer gives insight into China life, and the protagonist's breakaway from China, with delightful tidbits of Coolidge wisdom. A few really worthwhile twists in the story line. Derbyshire, when he isn't writing math books, should try another novel for us all.
Until recently, my only acquaintance with Mr. Derbyshire was in his role as a somewhat disagreeable controversialist in "National Review" magazine. Then, I noticed his most recent book (as of this posting), "Prime Obsession", a non-fiction account of the work of 19th century German mathematician Bernhard Riemann, whose prime number theorum remains one of the biggest unsolved problems in mathematics. Through the capsule biography of the author, I found out the existance of this book and consulted the reviews here.

Having read "Seeing Calvin Coolidge in a Dream", I can say that it fully lives up to the sometimes-extravagant praise posted here. The book has a quirky charm all its own, not least because of the first-person voice of its hero, Chai, a winning and fascinating personality. Since the plot has been fully discussed in other reviews here, I will limit myself to a few random observations.

--Chai's account of his participation in the Red Guards as a teenager reads like a chiller out of Chen Jo-Hsi's book, "The Execution of Mayor Yin, and Other Tales of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution" His witnessing of a gang-rape (which he feigns participation in) shames him and destroys at a stroke any loyalty to the Party he may have had. This starts him on his long road to America.

--Like Joseph Conrad in England, Chai masters the intricacies of English while in America. His ironic and insightful observations of the United States, China, and Hong Kong (before the PRC took over) are fun to read and dead-on.

--The long-dead Calvin Coolidge appears to give some dry and intelligent advice. Mr. Derbyshire manages to squash the old legend of "Silent Cal" as unintelligent and indolent. While the author perhaps spreads it a mite too thick, it is still a useful and entertaining corrective. (I hold with the political scientist who believes that Mr. Coolidge's apparent indolence was the result of a deep--perhaps clinical--depression at the death of his 16-year old son, Calvin Jr. from septicemia caused by an infected blister on his foot that had been raised playing tennis on the White House lawn.)

All of this is just by-the-by, however. The book was simply a delight and I urge anyone whose interest has been piqued by these comments to read it just as I did.