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eBook The Procedure download

by Paul Vincent,Harry Mulisch

eBook The Procedure download ISBN: 0670889296
Author: Paul Vincent,Harry Mulisch
Publisher: Viking (February 8, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 240
ePub: 1309 kb
Fb2: 1529 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf doc rtf azw
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Harry Mulisch is author of the international bestsellers The Assault, The Discovery of Heaven, and The Procedure, as well as other novels, short stories, essays, poetry, plays, and philosophical works

Harry Mulisch is author of the international bestsellers The Assault, The Discovery of Heaven, and The Procedure, as well as other novels, short stories, essays, poetry, plays, and philosophical works. Paul Vincent lives in London and translated Harry Mulisch's previous two novels.

The Discovery of Heaven (Dutch: De ontdekking van de hemel) is a 1992 novel by Dutch writer Harry Mulisch. A 2001 film adaptation by director Jeroen Krabbé features Stephen Fry and Flora Montgomery in the leading roles

This remarkable book handles huge themes with a great deal of wit as well as sympathy. Translated by Paul Vincent. The Following Story by Cees Nooteboom. The Discovery of Heaven by Harry Mulisch.

This remarkable book handles huge themes with a great deal of wit as well as sympathy. Find similar books Profile. Most people have never achieved anything great and yet they simply do their work; isn't it absurd that having achieved something great leads to more discontent than not having having achieved anything great. But perhaps the greatest achievement is always in the distance, perhaps the ultimate achievement is dying. Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder. happy sad. funny serious.

Internationally renowned novelist Harry Mulisch's The Procedure is a haunting and fascinating novel about two men who try to create life but fail

Internationally renowned novelist Harry Mulisch's The Procedure is a haunting and fascinating novel about two men who try to create life but fail. Four hundred years later, Victor Internationally renowned novelist Harry Mulisch's The Procedure is a haunting and fascinating novel about two men who try to create life but fail.

Harry Mulisch's last novel, The Discovery of Heaven, was published to critical acclaim on both sides of the Atlantic

Harry Mulisch's last novel, The Discovery of Heaven, was published to critical acclaim on both sides of the Atlantic. Harry Mulisch's last novel, The Discovery of Heaven, was published to critical acclaim on both sides of the Atlantic

Harry Mulisch, Paul Vincent. Prague, 16th century.

Harry Mulisch, Paul Vincent. Present day. Victor Werker is a Dutch scientist of international repute, creator of the 'eobiont', a form of life born from inorganic matter, using a DNA modelling technique.

by. Mulisch, Harry, 1927-; Vincent, Paul (Paul . Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Penguin Books, 1 Kas 1997 - 736 sayfa. Harry Mulisch is author of the international bestsellersThe Assault,The Discovery of Heaven, andThe Procedure, as well as other novels, short stories, essays, poetry, plays, and philosophical works. The Discovery of Heaven, Harry Mulisch's magnum opus, is a rich mosaic of twentieth-century trauma in which many themes-friendship, loyalty, family, art, technology, religion, fate, good, and evil-suffuse a suspenseful and resplendent narrative.

Originally published in Dutch as Siegfried by Uitgeverij de Bezige Bij, Amsterdam. Mulisch, Harry, 1927-. Siegfried, Harry Mulisch; translated by Paul Vincent. p. cm. eISBN : 978-0-142-00498-2. 1. Vincent, Paul (Paul . II. Title.

Published by Viking Books, 2001. Mulisch, Harry; Vincent, Paul (translator). Published by New York, NY, . Viking Penguin, 2001 (2001). ISBN 10: 0670910244, ISBN 13: 9780670910243. About the Author: Harry Mulisch is the author of such internationally bestselling novels as The Assault, which was made into the film that won the 1987 Oscar for Best Foreign Film, and The Discovery of Heaven. He has also published short stories, essays, poetry, plays, and philosophical works. Bibliographic Details. ISBN 10: 0670910244 ISBN 13: 9780670910243.

Comments: (7)
Ustamya
"The Procedure" (2001), by Harry Mulisch (b. 1927), is the thoughtful story of Victor Werker, a genetics scientist at UC Berkeley who explores the meaning of life from a scientific angle, inventing a new form of life called the eobiont, and with a philosophical tone, writing fatherly autobiographical letters to his daughter Aurora, named for the Roman goddess of dawn.
The book starts with the legendary story of Rabbi Jehudah Loew (Löw), a leader of the Jewish community of Prague in 1592, called by Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II to make him a golem, a man-made being of clay. He fears sacrilege, not to mention abject failure, but ultimately agrees. Loew is a man of Hebrew letters, the symbolic glyphs of his faith. Will his knowledge of those sacred symbols help him uncover the metaphysical key to life, bestowing it upon lifeless clay?
From Loew's colorful Prague, we jump back to our own time, to the story of Victor Werker's birth in Amsterdam a few years after World War Two, and the various tales and complications of the pregnancy and birth. Victor becomes a geneticist, and studies the letters of genetic sequencing, A, C, G, and T, the idiomatic symbols of his own profession. Will his education of those four letters unlock the scientific mystery of life, granting it to lifeless matter?
Victor invents an organism he calls the eobiont, "Life's Dawn". He becomes famous, and suffers the jealousy of Barend Brock, a colleague spurned by Victor after he tries to take credit for Victor's discovery. Victor diarizes his relationship to Clara, including Clara's pregnancy and their break-up, through letters to their daughter Aurora.
This novel is foremost of ideas. Today's metaphysical novelist's challenge seems to update the tale of Frankenstein (or Prometheus) to the age of genetics. Rabbi Loew's story is fascinating, and Victor Werker's struggles are interesting, but the book would benefit by describing more clearly the motivations of Loew and the Emperor, or delving more deeply into Victor's goals in life and career. Such details might help flesh the text out a bit more fully. Mulisch is a fine writer, and his novel "The Assault" (1982) is undoubtedly one of the more brilliant pieces of contemporary fiction from Europe today, but "The Procedure" does not weave tight the threads it has spun.
Nonetheless, "The Procedure" is a well-paced novel (230pp), and contains a number of interesting ideas, regarding the nature of life, love, and history. It can be recommended to anyone who wants to think about the nature of life, and reflect upon the often discordant dichotomy between the spiritual and the scientific.
Ubrise
This was a required book for an IB high school program........not my choice of reading but it did the job!
Nicanagy
The Procedure is about the life of a famous scientist after he has made his ground breaking research, in this case the creation of life from inorganic matter. It starts out with the biblical story of creation, then it moves on to the Jewish esoteric book that deals with how god created life, the Sefer Yetzirah (or Book of Creation), and then to the creation of the golem in the Prague ghetto in the 16th century. It is only after this introductory material that the readers are introduced to the scientist Victor Werker and his research on creating living matter from clay.
However the main body of the novel is about Victor after his famous discovery, and it is a very internal exploration of how his fame and research effect his later life. Struggles with the other scientist in the project, with the mother of their stillborn child, and with his attempts to move on to new areas of study are played out in Victor's thought processes.
The novel delves into the scientific mind as it tries to cope with the emotional and interpersonal realities of life. The translation reads well and the book, while it seemed to get bogged down in details in the middle, was compelling reading for me.
Dagdardana
Genetic engineering, the mapping of the Human Genome, and Cloning are all intensely debated issues at present. All are generally viewed as parts of the absolute leading edge of high technology. Genetically engineered life forms have been patented, the Human Genome has been mapped, and despite the political and religious protestations, cloning has continued to duplicate ever more complex replicas of life. And while laws are contemplated and passed forbidding the cloning of a human, it is not only likely, but also probable that such research proceeds somewhere.
The creation of life by mortal man has been routinely held as the ultimate taboo against nature and deeply held religious beliefs. Harry Mulisch writes in his book, "The Procedure", of two instances of creation and demonstrates the idea and perhaps the practice is not only far from new, it is centuries old. In the late 16th Century a Rabbi creates a Golem for a King, the procedure for which is outlined in a 3rd Century Text. Then in the 20th Century a Scientist creates a very primitive organic organism from non-organic materials, which gains the name eobliant. A Golem and the primitive organism that is created 400 years later have little in common as final products. The latter is a test tube creation while the former is, well the book will explain.
The commonality between these two events is obvious, and if I read the work correctly, the obvious is not what the author intended. The writing is deceptively straightforward to read. The Rabbi has an arguably valid and selfless reason for what he does, our contemporary scientist does not. The author diverges along the way with the tale of Frankenstein, the author and her contemporaries, but writing about an act and practicing it are widely separated issues.
Our scientist is also portrayed as being at the very least eccentric. He relates much of his story through letters he writes to his daughter who never lived. While the letters are to her, they are sent to the woman who would have been the child's mother. She left him for he failed her at the critical moment in their relationship, a moment that should not have been an issue for a father much less a man of science, and a man who was manipulating artificial life himself. For all the notoriety his creation has brought him, he gains no piece of mind, and constantly erodes as a person until he is having fictional conversations with a woman that would have been his wife about the cloning of their stillborn child. Cloning is a physical reproduction only, the mind, or the soul, if you prefer, is not replicated.
As I mentioned the book can read as deceptively straightforward, and my reading may be completely off the mark. Either way the book is a great piece of work, and a tremendous read. More than one reading would probably be appropriate.