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eBook Millionaires Daughter download

by Pat Starr,Dorothy Eden

eBook Millionaires Daughter download ISBN: 074515915X
Author: Pat Starr,Dorothy Eden
Publisher: Chivers Audio Books; Unabridged edition (October 1, 1986)
Language: English
ePub: 1777 kb
Fb2: 1759 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: txt lrf azw mbr
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Millionaires Daughter book. Dorothy Eden is a masterful storyteller. Every emotion the characters feel is as real as though I was experiencing them myself.

Millionaires Daughter book. Christabel Spencer in the turn-of-the-century New York glows. I have laughed, been indignant and cried at different stages of the book.

The Millionaire's Daughter is a Gilded Age tale of Harry Spencer, grandson of an English chimney sweep, whose . Written in 1984, The Millionaire remains a timeless Dorothy Eden classic

The Millionaire's Daughter is a Gilded Age tale of Harry Spencer, grandson of an English chimney sweep, whose desire for societal relevance means choosing a wife from a respectable family. To that end Spencer is led to the well-heeled but impoverished Van Leyden family. Written in 1984, The Millionaire remains a timeless Dorothy Eden classic.

The Millionaire's Daughter - Dorothy Eden. And, he had to remind himself, there was still the vital part of this project to be completed. Part One. The Millionaire. He was dressed for the kill, so to speak, in his tails, his gleaming white waistcoat, a white gardenia in his lapel, his small pointed golden beard groomed and shining, his blue eyes keen and alert. Billy, his coachman, was shivering in the freezing night air.

The daughter of one of New York City’s brash new millionaires and an impoverished socialite, Christabel Spencer inherited both her father’s passionate nature and her mother’s beauty and breeding. An American debutante in Paris and London, Chrissie waltzed with European princes and English lords, all of whom found her combination of looks and wealth irresistible. Despite her father’s dream of having an English aristocrat for a son-in-law, Chrissie is determined not to marry for social status alone. She cannot live without love-and will find it at any cost.

A ruthless self-made American decides that his daughter must become part of the social elite and marry an aristocrat regardless of her personal happiness.

The millionaire's daughter. by. Eden, Dorothy, 1912-1982. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gothic novels, Romantic thrillers. New York : Coward, McCann & Geoghegan. Uploaded by LineK on March 16, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

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Early bird books fresh ebook deals, delivered daily be the first to know- new deals hatch every day! The Millionaire’s Daughter Dorothy Eden To Dorothy Olding for her.

Early bird books fresh ebook deals, delivered daily be the first to know- new deals hatch every day! The Millionaire’s Daughter Dorothy Eden To Dorothy Olding for he. Fresh ebook deals, delivered daily. Be the first to know-. New deals hatch every day! The Millionaire’s Daughter. for her unfailing help and encouragement, especially with this book.

Dorothy Hall Hardback Children's & Young Adults' Books in English. William S. Burroughs Hardback Fiction Short Stories & Anthologies in English. Burroughs Hardback Fiction Short Stories & Anthologies.

Below you'll find a Dorothy Eden books list, including published and even unpublished works

Any type of book or journal citing Dorothy Eden as a writer should. Below you'll find a Dorothy Eden books list, including published and even unpublished works. Any type of book or journal citing Dorothy Eden as a writer should appear on this list. The full bibliography of the author Dorothy Eden below includes book jacket images whenever possible.

Comments: (7)
Weetont
No one spins a sink-your-teeth-into book like the acclaimed Dorothy Eden. The Millionaire's Daughter is a Gilded Age tale of Harry Spencer, grandson of an English chimney sweep, whose desire for societal relevance means choosing a wife from a respectable family. To that end Spencer is led to the well-heeled but impoverished Van Leyden family. Harry settles not on the eldest, flamboyant Mary Ellen as recommended for a bride, but on docile Louisa, the youngest who finds upstart Harry rich, but vain. Louisa is coaxed into a loveless marriage and jealous rift develops between the two sisters as Mary Ellen is left behind, a spinster without marital prospects.

Louisa copes well enough with a husband she is fond of but doesn't love. Years pass, children are born, heartache and tragedy ensues. After which the story spans from the glitter of Old New York, to the ballrooms of Paris and England where the Spencer's daughter Cristabel meets and a handsome aristocrat, previously wed, who desires an heir and the Spencer millions to restore his dilapidated estate. Without giving away the plot, the marriage includes exotic travels but it ultimately proves a lonely existence for the new bride Cristabel.

Written in 1984, The Millionaire remains a timeless Dorothy Eden classic. The characters are well drawn with twists and turns along the way. I wouldn't categorize it a romance, at least in modern terms, more the journey of a wealthy family who discovers the hard way that money can buy possessions, but it can't buy love. Add this title to your list, you won't be disappointed.
Bremar
I must have read a different book. I was bored to tears thru a great deal of what I read and the only thing this book made me feel was lots of depression and some tears. I got to part two, half way through. I got about half way into the 14th chapter where the millionaire daughter I guess is really starting. Sadly I realized I just didn't care anymore. I didn't care what happened to The daughter. I felt sad for the whole depressing family and not the least bit sorry as somehow this book leached my compassion as well as my interest completely out of me by then. Even if someone had told me it ended wonderful, I just did not care to find out by that time.. Time to find a good book to raise my spirits. To many sad and underserving characters to deal with in this book. I don't like giving reviews for books I have not finished, but it dawned on me at the point I was in the book that I have read way to many books thru to the end lately that have left me feeling lost and sad clear thru to the end and soooo disappointed that I endured and ended up wasting my time. I decided I wasted enough time being pulled down by this dysfunctional family. The people who should have communicated didn't and the ones that did were unlikeable and you would prefer they kept their pie holes shut. Even the characters I though I sort of liked have gone south (degraded to pitiful or boreline dislikable). Time to cut line and rehook hoping for a better read than this.... I have at this late date in my life decided that if I get a little more than half way thru a book and feel nothing but disturbed and depressed, that book is not for me.

Update; I went back and skim read the second half. I knew this was a mistake, but like I said, hate to leave a review for unfinished book. Some areas I read, others which got boring I just skimmed. Once I knew where it was going (by the 20th chapter) I knew the second half was more depressing than the first. What a horrendous tortured read this was. Still I didn't relent and skim read to the bitter end. I did fully read many areas, but when you have already guessed by the previous depressing patterns what horrible twists are coming, you end up skim reading to get past the bulk of what it. Finishing the book hasn't change my mind about what a wasted read this was. I stick with my original review and maybe even lower the stars to one in my heart. What a horrendous twisted sad tale.
The Sphinx of Driz
Make no mistake, Dorothy Eden, now deceased, wrote good books. She did that by creating well developed characters, doing her research to get the period details right and providing a generally engaging story. She was a talented author who wrote books that are are worth both your time and money. In fact, she wrote The Millionaire's Daughter so well, despite a few slow spots, that I was to the point of wanting to do serious harm to one of the major characters.

It's not often that a fictional character makes me so angry that I stew about it for hours after I finish a book. The story revolves around Harry Spencer, the quintessential self-made Gilded Age millionaire, his wife Louisa van Leyden Spencer and their daughter, Chrissie. Harry is truly a man who pulled himself up by his boostraps as he escaped abject poverty in England and made his way to America. Louisa is American Old Money fallen on hard times and Chrissie is Harry's beloved daughter and best chance to rub his success in the faces of old money English aristocracy. There is a secondary character in the form of Mary Ellen, Louisa's older sister. Over the course of the book, Mary Ellen was frequently annoying, but ultimately as honest a character as Harry. There was no doubting the motives of either of them.

So what made me angry? The character of Louisa. Harry is looking for a suitable wife to ease his way into New York society. The van Leyden's have two daughters: Mary Ellen and Louise. Mary Ellen is fronted as his choice, but Harry finds her too abrasive. The 'quiet one' in the form of Louisa catches his eye and soon they are married. She goes on and on about wanting to marry for love, but ultimately 'does her duty' and sacrifies herself to Harry. Without going into too much detail, over the course of their marriage, Louisa carries on as the 'sacrifice' for her parents', sister's and brother's continued well being. She periodically heaves great long-suffering sighs and commentary on the crushing burden of Harry's great and growing wealth. Of course, her feelings come to a head when their young son, Henry, is kidnapped and dies. From that point on, Louisa struggled to view Harry's ambition with anything other than martyred disdain. To this point of the book I was merely annoyed; it wasn't until the end of the book that the urge to do murder took over.

Harry wants Chrissie, the beloved, spoiled, headstrong daughter to make her debut in England, catch the eye of an English Earl, marry and live in one of the great houses. His grandfather had been a chimney sweep in some of those great houses and for his child to be the mistress of one would be the delicious irony that he wanted. You might think from my description that he was cold and manipulative, and while some manipulation figured into his actions, he still wanted nothing but his daughter's happiness. It was Louisa who ultimately tried to relive her life through her daughter. Her choices near the end of the book infuriated me. All of them were tied to her perceived view of the destructive nature of Harry's wealth. Now bear in mind, that never over the 25 or so years of their marriage, did you see her doing anything constructive with the wealth at her disposal. She just chose to feel martyred to it. Oh, she would have periodic periods of reflection about how good Harry had been to her and how she had developed an affection for him, but mostly, she believed herself to bee 'victimized' by his pursuit of wealth.

Without giving away the ending, just let me say that I viewed Louisa's choice at the end as not only unfair to Chrissie but also a huge betrayal of Harry. Kudos to Ms.Eden for writing so engagingly, but it may take awhile before I get over this.