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eBook The Lady Elizabeth (Historical Fiction) download

by Alison Weir

eBook The Lady Elizabeth (Historical Fiction) download ISBN: 1410407489
Author: Alison Weir
Publisher: Thorndike Pr; Large Print - 1st edition (June 18, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 835
ePub: 1231 kb
Fb2: 1660 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: mobi mbr txt rtf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

The official site of author and historian Alison Weir, featuring news of upcoming events and book releases along with exclusive content from Alison herself.

The official site of author and historian Alison Weir, featuring news of upcoming events and book releases along with exclusive content from Alison herself. They do understand that my e-shorts are of interest to readers who have read the novels, but these are not stand-alone e-shorts, and therefore appeal to a smaller pool of readers, so sales will be even fewer than for stand-alone e-shorts. Going forward, Ballantine hope to find a way of publishing the others.

Alison Weir is a British writer of history books, and latterly historical novels, mostly in the form of biographies about British royalty. Her first published work, 1989's Britain's Royal Families, was a genealogical overview of the British royal family. She subsequently wrote biographies of Eleanor of Aquitaine, Isabella of France, Katherine Swynford, Elizabeth of York, and the Princes in the Tower.

Elizabeth could see Lady Bryan watching them intently, standing a little .

Elizabeth could see Lady Bryan watching them intently, standing a little way off with Mary’s ladies and the nursemaids, and she was puzzled as to why her governess did not hasten to her rescue. Elizabeth often sat with her governess, being taught the things that all well-brought-up little girls needed to know. They might look at the vivid pictures in one of the beautifully illuminated books that the King had provided, or sort through embroidery silks, Lady Bryan allowing the child to pick the colors herself.

Booktopia has The Lady Elizabeth by Alison Weir.

So the book, while historical fiction, is based on fact-except for one event in Lady Elizabeth's life that is based . Ms Weir weaves her story around basic historical facts: Elizabeth had a father who was alternately kindly and cruel

So the book, while historical fiction, is based on fact-except for one event in Lady Elizabeth's life that is based on gossip. And it's a doozy! If it's true-and even Weir has significant doubts due to primarily circumstantial evidence-it totally changes the image of Elizabeth, widely considered one of England's greatest queens, if not THE greatest. Ms Weir weaves her story around basic historical facts: Elizabeth had a father who was alternately kindly and cruel. She saw him execute two wives and discard one-and she had two stepmothers die in childbirth. She saw her sister become a dreaded tyrant after an unloving marriage.

The Lady Elizabeth book. Allison Weir offers another example of exemplary historical fiction with this novel relating the youth of Elizabeth the first. Daughter of Henry the eighth by Ann Bolyn, she grew up motherless but for her Nanny. She suffered the term bastard and was legitimized in the will of her father.

The sequel to The Lady Elizabeth Their affair is the scandal of Europe. Drawing from a rich trove of historical records, Weir gives a long overdue and much-deserved look at this unforgettable princess whose line descends to today’s British monarch-a woman who overcame tragedy and danger to become one of England’s most beloved consorts. Praise for Elizabeth of York Weir tells Elizabeth’s story well. Bestselling historian Alison Weir brings Elizabeth I to vivid life in a novel of intrigue, sex, plots, mysteries and tragedies, amid all the colour and pageantry of the Tudor court. gets right inside the head of the Virgin Queen.

Authors: Alison Weir. And, he thought to himself, it would be wise to establish a good working relationship with Elizabeth just in case she ever does become queen. Her grateful goodwill for his rescuing her from prison would surely prove the basis for such a rapport. I don’t want her here, Mary said, becoming agitated. She makes trouble wherever she goes. According to her jailer’s reports, her conduct has been impeccable lately, MoreLess Show More Show Less.

Alison Weir: When I began writing The Lady Elizabeth, I feared I was in some peril of writing a very similar book to Innocent Traitor, because Elizabeth Tudor and Jane Grey were young Tudor princesses, both dangerously near in blood to the throne. Both had difficult childhoods and devoted nurses, both were incredibly intelligent and clever–being the products of a forward-thinking Renaissance education–and both were converts to the Protestant faith in an age of religious dogmatism in which heretics were burned at the stake.

A fictional portrait of the tumultuous early life of Queen Elizabeth I describes her perilous path to the throne of England and the scandal, political intrigues, and religious turmoil she confronted along the way.
Comments: (7)
Uaha
This novel about the life of Queen Elizabeth I before she was crowned queen is a daring, somewhat gossipy tell-all based (mostly) on historical facts. Author Alison Weir is first and foremost a nonfiction writer, who is an expert on Tudor England. So the book, while historical fiction, is based on fact--except for one event in Lady Elizabeth's life that is based on gossip. And it's a doozy! If it's true--and even Weir has significant doubts due to primarily circumstantial evidence--it totally changes the image of Elizabeth, widely considered one of England's greatest queens, if not THE greatest.

But what is fact is her tragic childhood, losing her mother, Anne Boleyn, when Elizabeth was just 2-1/2, her relationship with her volatile father, King Henry VIII, the declaration of her bastard status, and a horrendous adolescence/young adulthood when her sister, Queen Mary, kept her either under house arrest or locked up in the infamous Tower of London for fear her baby sister would steal the throne from her.

This is a bawdy, as well as horrific, tale of politics, religion, palace intrigue, ever-present danger (real and imagined) and sex that is captivating and compelling to read. It's a history lesson based on the personalities of the time that is well worth it!
Felolak
Elizabeth the First, England's most famous queen, was attractive, brilliant, shrewd, flirtatious, and charismatic. Yet she remained single at a time when it was vital for a woman to be married- and for a monarch to provide an heir to the throne. This absorbing novel, which takes Elizabeth from early childhood to the day she becomes queen, explores the possible reasons why this ruler chose to remain "The Virgin Queen." Ms Weir weaves her story around basic historical facts: Elizabeth had a father who was alternately kindly and cruel. She saw him execute two wives and discard one-and she had two stepmothers die in childbirth. She saw her sister become a dreaded tyrant after an unloving marriage. Thus, according to Ms Weir,the young Elizabeth associated marriage with sorrow, pain, and death. The combination of fact, theory and a very good story line makes for a very credible rendition of Elizabeth's childhood and youth. However, even though Ms Weir stuck to the facts and wove her tale around them, she included one incident that is pure conjecture. I will not reveal this incident- read the book and make your own conclusions!
Invissibale
There's quite a bit of conjecture in this book, and it delves so nicely with "the Marriage Game" by the same author that one has to remember that the most scandalous parts of the book are purely speculation This highly respected author would have had strong reasons for writing what she did, but others most certainly don't agree with her idea of the relationship between Thomas Seymour and Elizabeth I.

Having said that, it's a fun read and it's always good to pick up details that are rooted in fact, as well as one possible back story. It's written well and if I "bought" the idea of an early affair or relationship between the two characters mentioned here I would have given it five starts.
avanger
This was an extremely interesting. Make a me want to read more,about the Tutors and EliZabeth in particular. I could hardly put it down. Related rumors of the time. Showed how,close she came to death when her sister was queen. When England thought women were no good in leadership positions, it seems that their best leaders have been women, both queens and prime minister's.

There is intrigue of the reformation, the desire for heirs, and the purely political marriages. Speaks if the horrors if the inquisition and it was brought to England with Philip of Spain when he married Mary. Extremely informative novel. Author speaks to rumors that can't be proved and tells how she handled some historical situations and,also so.e violations but seems to be close to historic truth. Was well written and the reader lives with Elizabeth from her early years until she gains the throne. I highly recommend it.
MeGa_NunC
This book gives a detailed account of Queen Elizabeth I prior to her ascending the throne. The portrayal provides an insight that leaves one wondering why anyone would wish to be a 'Royal'. There are sufficient historical references to concede the veracity proposed by the tale. The story also gives some depth to at least three generations of royals who held the throne; the machinations behind the throne that gave King Henry such a bloody lifeline while on the throne are actually quite believable. Clearly Queen Elizabeth I enjoyed a much longer reign than did her father, brother or sister, as well as other past members of both royalty and their advisers. Weir gives quite a lot of in-depth description to the emotions and thought process of Lady Elizabeth as well as other characters closely related in the book. This is now an excellent prequel to her book on Queen Elizabeth I.