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eBook Santa Fe Passage download

by Jon R. Bauman

eBook Santa Fe Passage download ISBN: 031233348X
Author: Jon R. Bauman
Publisher: Truman Talley Books; First Edition edition (November 12, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 336
ePub: 1357 kb
Fb2: 1990 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: doc mbr txt docx
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

SANTA FE PASSAGE This epic novel captures the forces of history, politics, nature and religion that forged a unique corner of the new world.

SANTA FE PASSAGE This epic novel captures the forces of history, politics, nature and religion that forged a unique corner of the new world. a scrupulous historian, Bauman faithfully recreates the powerful social and political forces that converged on New Mexico. -David J. Weber, author of the Pulitzer Prize-nominated The Spanish Frontier in North America.

BOOK ONE 1822-1827 One 1822 "When my indenture's up next month, I'm gone. Jon R. Bauman, for many years an international lawyer, is the author of two nonfiction books; Santa Fe Passage is his first novel. Mr. Bauman lives in Dallas, Texas with his wife, Lou. I hear the Santa Fe Trail's dangerous as hell-eight hundred miles through Indian country. Bauman.

by. Bauman, Jon R. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Mexico - History - 1821-1861 - Fiction, Mexico - History - 1821-1861 - Fiction, Santa Fe (. - Fiction, Santa Fe National Historic Trail - Fiction, Mexico, New Mexico - Santa Fe. Publisher. New York : St. Martin's ; Godalming : Melia. Uploaded by ttscribe4. hongkong on November 9, 2018. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Bauman Rare Books offers an extraordinary selection of rare books and autographs in all fields. Last-minute shopper? At Bauman Rare Books, you're just in time for ths season's best. Visit us online, at our galleries in New York or Las Vegas, or call us at 1-809-BAUMAN. From dozens of Christmas and Hanukkah books to beloved literary classics, we're sure to have the perfect gift for your loved one (or even yourself).

Santa Fe, in the early 1800s, was a part of Mexico, and the city's landed gentry, the haciendados, had developed an appetite for the good life. Matthew Collins, an entrepreneurial American, sees opportunity there. Matthew Collins, an entrepreneurial American, sees opportunity there

New York: Truman Talley Books, 2004. Historical novel of the early 1800s when two cultures met at the southwestern end of the Santa Fe Trail ISBN: 031233348X.

New York: Truman Talley Books, 2004. Very Good in Fine DJ. Top corne. Other Products from hartmannbooks (View All). The Children Of The Nations: A Study Of Colonization And Its Problems.

Santa fe passage Bauman, Jon R. Неизвестно 9780312940034 : In 1823, one long trail connected the backwater . Неизвестно 9780312940034 : In 1823, one long trail connected the backwater colony of Mexico with a booming America. 2006 Язык: ENG Издание: New ed Иллюстрации: Map Размер: 1. 7 x 1. 2 x . 2 cm Читательская аудитория: General (us: trade) Рейтинг

Santa Fe Passage is a 1955 Trucolor Western film directed by William Witney and starring John Payne, Faith Domergue and Rod Cameron.

Santa Fe Passage is a 1955 Trucolor Western film directed by William Witney and starring John Payne, Faith Domergue and Rod Cameron. Kirby Randolph (John Payne) is a veteran scout who comes to hate all Indians after being betrayed by a Kiowa chief called Satank (George Keymas), whose massacre killed many men and ruined Kirby's reputation. Kirby and his sidekick Sam Beekman (Slim Pickens) are offered work by Jess Griswold (Rod Cameron), who believes a man deserves a second chance.

Santa Fe, in the early 1800s, was a part of Mexico, and the city's landed gentry, the haciendados, had developed . Bauman, for many years an international lawyer, is the author of two nonfiction books; this is his first novel. More about Jon R.

Santa Fe, in the early 1800s, was a part of Mexico, and the city's landed gentry, the haciendados, had developed an appetite for the good life. Matthew Collins, an entrepreneurial American, sees opportunity there. He bankrolls a wagon train filled with fine goods from St. Louis and, with a partner, succeeds in transporting everything, despite storms and fierce bands of Comanches, across the Great American Desert to a ready market in Santa Fe.Soon, Matt and his partner become prosperous and respected men. Matt profits from the trapping and selling of hundreds of beaver skins just before the London market for them collapses. Welcomed into the home of Moses Mendoza, one of the leading haciendados, Matt eventually marries Moses's daughter Celestina.By the mid-1840s, war looms between the United States and Mexico. Matt is called to Washington by President Polk. The urgent matter: how to arrange the turnover of New Mexico and Santa Fe to the United States without causing great bloodshed. Matt develops a plan...Mixing a fascinating and exciting cast of characters with the adventure and uncertainty of the times, Santa Fe Passage is a remarkable story full of rich detail and vivid imagery of life in then Mexico in the early nineteenth century.
Comments: (7)
Togar
I found this book following a visit to Santa Fe and Taos. Mr. Bauman brought the area's history to life for me. The fictional characters are engaging and the events and landmarks factual. One of the best works of historical fiction that I have read. A wonderful read for anyone interested in the history of the American west.
Zorve
Unfortunately I found the book rather dry. I did not finish it. I got about 34% of the way through on my Kindle and stopped... after I had purchased it. It just goes from one event to the other without any real umph. It's kindda like someone talking in a monotone.
Mmsa
Very well written, interesting subject matter.
Bandiri
An interesting story, and very well written.
GawelleN
The novel opens in Washington DC in 1846 ,on the eve the Mexican -American War .President Polk is anxious to avert the possibility of an uprising in New Mexico that would leave US forces stretched to -and possibly beyond- their limits.He seeks the intervention of a prominent figure in the region ,the US citizen but long time New Mexico resident ,Matt Collins ,asking that he pressurise the governor of the region ,Susano Baca ,and his fiery aide ,Colonel Diego Zambrano,to allow a peaceable US occupation of the area.

The book then flashes back in time and traces the life of Collins from 1822 to the point of his meeting with Polk .We learn of his raising by nuns in an orphanage ,his apprenticeship to to a storekeeper in Kakasia ,Illinois and his first ventures in to the fur trade under the tutelage of an Englishman Amos Vick, a hard taskmaster but an excellent teacher.the book treats of the dangers ,perils and hardships of the trail to Mexican territory.Collins becomes a successful entrepreneur by trading Yankee goods in Sante Fe and becomes an accepted part of the social and political scene in the city.

Santa Fe is remote from the capital in Mexico City and is neglected by the corrupt administration there .Tensions run high between Anglos and Mexican in the territory but hey do not prevent him from marrying into an established and wealthy local family .He finds himself torn between two cultures ,and the decision he is asked to make by Polk is by no means a foregone conclusion .

There is much to enjoy in the novel .The action is plentiful and vividly described ,and it works also as a primer on New Mexican politics ,culture and history in the era.The issues at stake are fairly laid out by the author and there is some shrewd characterisation ,especially of the oleaginous ,but shrewd Baca.Matt is a tad pompous and prone to speeechifying for my taste but this is a minor blemish on what is a satisfying historical novel that will entertain and inform its readers .
Saintrius
This book is a fascinating look at a period of western history not usually covered by fiction writers.
The author brilliantly uses real characters and events to weave a story which is both entertaining and informative.
The characters are, in most cases, composites of several people who lived at the time. What struck me most was the lack of incomplete story flow - usually I have to stop and wonder why the author did not have the characters do a particular act, or glosses over some detail which would enhance the story. I am too often left having to mentally fill in a story, even one written by our foremost talents. But this author seems to anticipate the nip-picky reader, and takes care of the small details in a very-complete manner.
I found it hard to put down, but he conveniently provides stopping points where the reader can lay the book down, and come back to continue the story later.
A great read - I encourage those who admire L'Amour, Brand, Haycox and others to read this one. They will not regret it.
Lli
There have been many novels about the Santa Fe Trail, most of which tell little if anything about the historic route, but Santa Fe Passage is based on extensive research and is by far the best historical novel about the Trail. Jon Bauman, an international lawyer with special interest in Latin America, has written a readable, entertaining, and informative story that rings true.
Trail historians will know the sources of many of his characters and their stories, including the first U.S. woman to travel the Trail with her family and operate a hotel in Santa Fe, a woman injured in a carriage accident who miscarries her child at Bent's Fort, a Jewish trader and merchant in Santa Fe, a Mexican woman who owns a gambling establishment and assists Mexican officials and American traders, a governor who is in and out of power in Santa Fe as changes occur in Mexico City, a village priest who opposes the Anglo influences, and the main character Matthew Collins who runs away from an apprenticeship and becomes a Santa Fe trader who marries into a prominent Mexican family and is selected by President James Polk and Senator Thomas Hart Benton to persuade the governor of New Mexico to allow Stephen W. Kearny's Army of the West to occupy Santa Fe without resistance in 1846.
Bauman has a good understanding of all three cultures affected by the Santa Fe Trail, and he creates a number of realistic characters, not stereotypes, for all of them: Anglo, Indian, and Mexican. He has researched the history of the Trail, with help from historian Mike Olsen, and the book is endorsed by historian David Weber. The interaction of the American traders with Mexican citizens is done well. Purists may argue that Bauman has moved some events in time and place (for example there was no Bowie Knife in 1826 and Raton Pass was not an option for a wagon train in that year), but this is creative fiction based on history; just enjoy it.
Not only is this finely-crafted, thoughtful, and sophisticated novel a good read, it will cause readers to want to know more about the history of the Trail. As one of the characters in the novel, Jack Marentette the mountain man, might say, "This is a splendiferous book."