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by Julianne Lee

eBook Her Mother's Daughter: A Novel of Queen Mary Tudor download ISBN: 0425230082
Author: Julianne Lee
Publisher: Berkley; Original edition (December 1, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 336
ePub: 1137 kb
Fb2: 1142 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: txt rtf docx mobi
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

1) It is the first novel about Mary Tudor I've read that hardly mentions her half-sister and rival Elizabeth. Elizabeth was the bane of her life, especially after Mary became queen. Elizabeth's mother broke her parents' marriage and thus Mary's mother's heart.

1) It is the first novel about Mary Tudor I've read that hardly mentions her half-sister and rival Elizabeth. Because of Anne Boleyn, Mary's father degraded her from "princess" to "bastard" and forced her to renounce her Catholic faith. And unless Mary gave birth to an heir to her throne, Elizabeth would succeed her as queen and undo her work restoring the Catholic Church

Her Mother's Daughter book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Her Mother's Daughter: A Novel of Queen Mary Tudor as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Her Mother's Daughter book.

Автор: Lee Julianne Название: Her Mother& Daughter: A Novel of. .This book features an endearing heroine who is brought wonderfully to life through the art of newcomer LeUyen Pham.

This book features an endearing heroine who is brought wonderfully to life through the art of newcomer LeUyen Pham. Автор: Moore, Julianne Название: Freckleface strawberry ISBN: 0747589054 ISBN-13(EAN): 9780747589051 Издательство: Bloomsbury Рейтинг

Her Mother’s Daughter. A Novel of Queen Mary Tudor

Her Mother’s Daughter. A Novel of Queen Mary Tudor. By Julianne Lee. Best Seller. Category: Historical Fiction. Told by Mary herself and the people around her, this grand-scale novel takes us back to the glittering court of sixteenth-century England, and tells the tragic story of a fascinating, largely misunderstood woman who withstood the treachery and passion around her only to become one of England?s most vilified queens. Also by Julianne Lee. See all books by Julianne Lee. Product Details.

Julianne Lee attempts to bring to modern day readers the sympathetic view of Mary Tudor, the misunderstood queen of the sixteenth century. Queen Mary did not have an easy life, and the author immediately sets off to show her readers the myriad of different situations that she was placed in due to the fact that she was the daughter of King Henry VIII. Most Tudor era fans know the story of this Mary Tudor, who was otherwise known as Bloody Mary due to her excessive execution of heretics.

item 2 Her Mother's Daughter by Lee, Julianne-ExLibrary -Her Mother's Daughter by Lee, Julianne-ExLibrary. Additional Product Features. Julianne Lee. Place of Publication. item 3 NEW - Her Mother's Daughter: A Novel of Queen Mary Tudor by Lee, Julianne -NEW - Her Mother's Daughter: A Novel of Queen Mary Tudor by Lee, Julianne.

Mary Tudor was the first queen regnant of England, reigning from 1553 . Mary took the throne as the first queen regnant and reinstated her parents’ marriage

Mary Tudor was the first queen regnant of England, reigning from 1553 until her death in 1558. She is best known for her religious persecutions of Protestants and the executions of over 300 subjects. Mary took the throne as the first queen regnant and reinstated her parents’ marriage. At first, she acknowledged the religious dualism of her country, but she desperately wanted to convert England back to Catholicism.

by Julianne Lee. She was a queen who loved unwisely and did not rule well. Her Mother’s Daughter: A Novel of Queen Mary Tudor. Her name was Mary Tudor. But was Mary Stuart guilty of murder? It is three days after the execution of Mary Stuart and the streets of London are buzzing with the news. But not everyone is convinced that the scandalized Queen of Scots was guilty of plotting against her cousin, Elizabeth I-or that she was involved in the murder of her husband, Henry, Lord Darnley. First of the Tudor queens, she has been known throughout history as Bloody Mary.

Mary Tudor (/ˈtjuːdər/; March 1496 – 25 June 1533) was an English princess who was briefly Queen consort of France, the progenitor of a family that eventually claimed the English throne. She was the younger surviving daughter of King Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York, and the third wife of Louis XII of France, who was more than 30 years older than she. Following his death, she married Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk

Her Mother's Daughter: A Novel of Queen Mary Tudor by Julianne Lee. Novel about Queen Mary I, a "misunderstood woman who withstood the treachery around her only to become one of England's most vilified queens. The King's Daughter by Barbara Kyle.

Her Mother's Daughter: A Novel of Queen Mary Tudor by Julianne Lee. With her beloved father imprisoned by England's Mary I, an English woman plots to overthrow the queen and bring the future Elizabeth I to power. Mary Tudor: Courageous Queen or Bloody Mary? by Jane Buchanan.

A new novel of sixteent-century royalty from the author of A Question of Guilt Her name was Mary Tudor. First of the Tudor queens, she has gone down in history as Bloody Mary. But does she deserve her vicious reputation? She was the daughter of Henry VIII and Katherine of Aragon, and half-sister to Edward VI and Elizabeth I. Mary Tudor?s life began as the sweetly innocent, pampered princess of Wales?until the age of eleven when the father she adored cast aside the mother she worshipped and declared Mary a bastard. Only after years of exile did Mary finally rise to the throne alongside the man who, aside from her father, was her greatest love?and her greatest betrayer. Told by Mary herself and the people around her, this grand-scale novel takes us back to the glittering court of sixteenth-century England, and tells the tragic story of a fascinating, largely misunderstood woman who withstood the treachery and passion around her only to become one of England?s most vilified queens.
Comments: (7)
interactive man
This was a great book. It gives the reader a personal look into Mary Tudors life from her view which makes you feel empathetic towards the life she lived and see there was more to her story than what was rumored about her behavior. I loved the book and would recommend any reader who loves British History to delve into this story and see the person this short term Queen was.
Mavegelv
I admit that my opinion of this novel was shaped in part by the rather bizarre preface, in which a group of modern day schoolgirls at a slumber party try to conjure up the spirit of "Bloody Mary" in an old mirror without really knowing what they're doing or who Mary Tudor (daughter of Henry VIII, half sister to Elizabeth) may have been. Of course, once all the girls are asleep in their sleeping bags, Mary materializes and studies the sleeping girls, almost tearfully. "Wretched, undeserved name," she says of her nickname. "Would that I could tell you and you would listen."

And that's the device that Julianne Lee uses to launch this novel, one that rushes over or omits Mary's reaction to major life events (her separation from her mother, Catherine of Aragon; her mother's death; the execution of Anne Boleyn) in favor of 'insights' from characters like a pickpocket and a Catholic Londoner. The narrative doesn't flow smoothly, but bumps along - I kept wondering if I was misreading something when in the space of a page or two we moved from Mary at age 11 to Mary age 17. Even more distracting was the interruption to the story itself when Mary addresses the reader (presumably her school girl audience?), as if recounting a history lesson. ("My father's final years were the most pleasant of my adult life" and "I knew my purpose was to save my people from those who would destroy their very souls" are examples of this ponderous device at work.)

Leaving aside the fact that the book is littered with small errors that multiply over time (Lee has Bishop John Fisher being hung; in fact, his sentence was commuted to beheading) and elements that simply don't ring true (would she really have addressed Anne Boleyn as "stepmother" to the latter's face, since Mary rejected the idea that the marriage was valid), this simply is a tedious book. After struggling through the first half, which failed to capture my interest at all, I skimmed over the second half, seeing no sign of any improvement.

It's a shame, because Mary Tudor is, as Lee clumsily notes in the introduction, a monarch who struggles to shake off the reputation earned in the last years of her life and a woman who was known during her life before taking the crown for her generosity and wide-ranging friendships (she was a close friend of Anne of Cleves, for instance) as for her piety and oppression of her sister Elizabeth. She's also one of the only members of the Tudor dynasty who hasn't been written about from several dozen different angles. (I'm convinced that there's nothing fresh at all to say about either Anne Boleyn or her daughter, Elizabeth, by this point.) There have been a few other ham-handed efforts to humanize Mary, such as the rather bad book by Suzannah Dunn, The Queen's Sorrow (Lee's book makes this one seem much stronger in retrospect...)

Perhaps this will appeal to die-hard Tudor historical fiction afficionados, at least those who don't have a knowledge of the character or the period and who thus are less likely to find the frequent interruptions by Mary's first-person summaries of historical events to be deeply irritating. But I'd suggest avoiding this book, and turning instead to the excellent books about Mary by Hilda Lewis. Originally published in (I believe) the 1960s/1970s, they are lively reads, accurate and gripping. Yes, they are out of print (although some of Lewis's other books are being republished, so at least there is hope...) but they are extraordinarily affordable on Amazon's British site. The trilogy begins with I Am Mary Tudor, continues with Mary the Queen and ends with Bloody Mary. Those are excellent four-star books; this I've rated 1.5 stars and rounded up only because I suppose it will appeal as a first step toward understanding a complex character and a turbulent period of history. As far as I'm concerned, unfortunately, it's a purchase that I regret having made.
Ffel
While this book seemed like it was wrote to that of a middle-school grade level, it was a very poignant and mournful tale of 'Bloody Mary'. Her father, King Henry VIII adored her, and titled her 'Princess of Whales' until she was eleven when he discarded her and her mother Katherine of Aragon for Anne Boleyn. Mary returns to the court as a maid in the household to her half-sister, Princess Elizabeth. Mary is painted is a head-strong woman, who wants to return her country to what is called the 'true faith' and strives to earn the love/respect of her people. As a ruler, following her half-brother's death and her cousins' execution, she struggles with her advisers pulling her in every direction and finding love in Spanish-heir, Phillip II of Spain to provide England with a son to be the next king.

Though this book does gloss over quite a few major events and leaves a lot to the imagination, it still presents a side to Mary that most of history fails to see. Being a woman and a ruler, she was easily manipulated and wanted love, acceptance, and to rule as a beloved queen as her mother was.
Zeleence
This book is about Queen Mary I, the daughter of King Henry VIII, known to Protestants as "Bloody Mary". Her story is told in part by her ghost, and in part told in third person viewpoint.

Although it has good vocabulary has several interesting scenes, I found it disappointing.

1) It is the first novel about Mary Tudor I've read that hardly mentions her half-sister and rival Elizabeth. Elizabeth was the bane of her life, especially after Mary became queen. Elizabeth's mother broke her parents' marriage and thus Mary's mother's heart. Because of Anne Boleyn, Mary's father degraded her from "princess" to "bastard" and forced her to renounce her Catholic faith. And unless Mary gave birth to an heir to her throne, Elizabeth would succeed her as queen and undo her work restoring the Catholic Church. Mary merely refers to her as a "monster" (other than that Elizabeth is the darling of the anti-papists and "that whore's" daughter, we don't know why Mary calls her that. Elizabeth herself does not appear in the book, so the reader can't judge her character, or whether Mary's epithet is justified.) Mary seems offhand about imprisoning her after the Wyatt rebellion. No mention of her release and King Philip's part in effecting it. No word of jealousy about that from Mary.

2) The book glosses over Mary's life. First we see her at 5, being presented to her cousin, the Emperor Charles. A couple of pages later, she is 9 years old and in Wales. We hardly sense what she senses, or understand what she feels and why, before she's two, four or ten years older and somewhere else. It's herky-jerky - very little flow and very little connection between the episodes.

And there could have been more, particularly about Queen Katherine of Aragon, the 'mother' in the title. Anne of Cleves was scarcely mentioned and Katherine Parr not at all, yet the scuttlebutt in the history books is that Mary converted Anne to Catholicism and Mary had a good relationship with Katherine Parr while the latter was queen, yet Mary felt Catherine had broke faith with her father after his death when she suddenly married Thomas Seymour.

Mary, in this novel, is very concerned about how others perceive her. In the prologue, when a group of modern day girls at a slumber party attempt to conjure up her ghost by repeating "Bloody Mary", Mary remarks that it was "a wretched, undeserved name." When her state is degraded from "princess" to "lady", she fights being called "lady" whenever she can, her reason being that "I Am The King's Only Legitimate Daughter, Not a Bastard." That's true to the real Mary Tudor. But the author made a big mistake when the fictional Mary calls Anne Boleyn her stepmother. The real Mary would never have called her that. Calling Anne "stepmother" acknowledges that Anne was legitimately married to Henry.

That brings me to another boo-boo: the egalitarian use of first names. The Tudor court was very status conscious. It had to be. The Tudors were conscious of being the new [read "upstart"] dynasty among royal families and also because Henry VIII made himself 'Pope of England'. To call King Henry or King Edward "Henry" or "Edward" was in effect denying the King's titles. Hundreds of folks were executed for even mildly criticizing among friends that the King should not have taken control of the Church. King Henry could call Cardinal Wolsey or the Duke of Norfolk "Thomas". He ranked above them all. They would never call him "Henry". Always "Your Grace", "Your Majesty" or "Sire". Same with Edward VI, though Edward was a boy and they were men. Even his sister had to kneel at his feet. Yet in this novel, his Accession Councillors, all inferiors to him in rank, called him "Edward" to his face.

There are other historical problems. King Henry commuted Cardinal-Bishop Fisher of Rochester's sentence to simple beheading - not the whole "hanged - drawn - quartered" scenario presented in the novel.

There are some fine little vignettes scattered through the book. Mary's sexual awakening by Philip, and her qualms about her feelings being "Sin". The fire that burned down a Catholic church and killed several children. Bishop Hooper's death at the stake. The author wrote them well; but they are like pearls and gems strung on a rough string.

Hilda Lewis's "I Am Mary Tudor" and "Bloody Mary", though out of print, are closer to the historical Mary I than this slim story. I also recommend Carolly Erikson's "Bloody Mary" Bloody Maryas a good popular history, as it is novelistic in approach.