carnevalemanfredonia.it

eBook Mr. American download

by George MacDonald Fraser

eBook Mr. American download ISBN: 078670554X
Author: George MacDonald Fraser
Publisher: Carroll & Graf Pub (June 1, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 585
ePub: 1530 kb
Fb2: 1478 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: rtf docx txt doc
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

George MacDonald Fraser. St James's Place, London. It was an American voice, sharp and eager, perhaps a little too conciliatory. Oh, and I have a copy of one of Mr Conan Doyle - I beg your pardon, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's novels, printed in America.

George MacDonald Fraser. Want me to keep an eye on that one, sir?'

Like most of the people who will probably read this book, I found out about George MacDonald Fraser through the Flashman Papers

Like most of the people who will probably read this book, I found out about George MacDonald Fraser through the Flashman Papers. If you liked Flashy and his exploits, I'd recommend "Mr. American," but I would caution you: it's NOT the same kind of novel. Fraser's meticulous attention to historical detail and vivid characterization are still on display, but another Victorian-era adventure this ain't. How is "Mr. American" different?

George MacDonald Fraser OBE FRSL (2 April 1925 – 2 January 2008) was a Scottish author who wrote historical novels, non-fiction books and several screenplays.

George MacDonald Fraser OBE FRSL (2 April 1925 – 2 January 2008) was a Scottish author who wrote historical novels, non-fiction books and several screenplays. He is best known for a series of works that featured the character Flashman. Fraser was born to Scottish parents in Carlisle, England, on 2 April 1925. His father was a doctor and his mother a nurse. It was his father who passed on to Fraser his love of reading, and a passion for his Scottish heritage.

Mark Franklin came from the American West to Edwardian England with two long-barrelled. 44s in his baggage and a fortune in silver in the bank. Where he had got it and what he was looking for no one could guess, although they wondered - at Scotland Yard, in City offices, in the glittering theatreland of the West End, in the highest circles of Society (even King Edward was puzzled) and in the humble pub at Castle Lancing.

George MacDonald Fraser

George MacDonald Fraser. A self-confident performance by an old hand. Mr. Fraser clearly enjoys being master of such a wide and wild plot and makes sure to leave room in it for his most famous creation, the eponymous hero of his "Flashman" adventure series. Flashman on the March-the twelfth book in George MacDonald Fraser’s ever-beloved, always scandalous Flashman Papers series-is Flashman and Fraser at their best. 955. Published: 2005. George MacDonald Fraser's hilarious stories of the most disastrous soldier in the British Army are collected together for the first time in one volume.

This page contains details about the Fiction book Mr. American by George MacDonald Fraser published in 1980

This page contains details about the Fiction book Mr. American by George MacDonald Fraser published in 1980. This book is the 1938th greatest Fiction book of all time as determined by thegreatestbooks.

A self-confident performance by an old hand.

Автор:George Fraser MacDonald

Автор:George Fraser MacDonald. Here the guide books which the porter had obtained were waiting for him, but he ignored them in favour of the large ordnance survey map of Norfolk, which he spread out on the bed and began to examine with close attention. For half an hour he pored over it, the dark face intent as he traced over the fine print and symbols denoting such detailed items as railway cuttings, plantations, marshes, forest paths, churches with spires (and with towers), historic sites, and the like, and the quaint, pastoral place-names, Attleborough, Sheringham, Swaffham, Methwold, and Castle Lancing.

by. George MacDonald Fraser. Flashman, Harry Paget (Fictitious character) - Fiction, Americans - England - Fiction, London (England) - Fiction. Carroll & Graf Publishers. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

General Harry Flashman delves into the past of a American cowboy who appears in nineteenth-century London with two Remingtons and a copy of Shakespeare. By the author of Flashman and the Angel of the Lord. Reprint.
Comments: (7)
Gavigamand
Like most of the people who will probably read this book, I found out about George MacDonald Fraser through the Flashman Papers. If you liked Flashy and his exploits, I'd recommend "Mr. American," but I would caution you: it's NOT the same kind of novel. Fraser's meticulous attention to historical detail and vivid characterization are still on display, but another Victorian-era adventure this ain't.
How is "Mr. American" different? For starters, the main character is Mark Franklin, an American who made his fortune in silver and has decided to return to his roots in the English countryside. He's no Flashman-he's quiet, introspective, and a little naive about England and the English, particularly the moneyed gentry who become his social set. Secondly, "Mr. American" takes place between 1909 and 1914, the Edwardian era instead of the Victorian. And that's an important change, because there's the spectre of the Great War looming in the background, and that's brought home by encountering General Flashman himself! In some ways, Flashman's still the old rogue we always knew (he hasn't slowed down much for a man in his nineties), but underneath the Falstaff veneer is some bitter and hard-won wisdom that he shares with the American he befriends. As one of the few people in the story who's seen service, he's got an inkling of what's coming, and he doesn't like it a bit.
And that melancholy feeling extends throughout "Mr. American." Some of the bawdiness of the Flashman Papers is still there, but it feels tired now, a little dirty and a little desperate. Finally, "Mr. American" is a third-person novel, not a first-person one. You don't feel like you're being taken into the confidence of a storyteller with a leering wink like you did in the Flashman Papers; the reader, like Franklin, is a little removed from the scene.
Like I said, I recommend "Mr. American." It's a beautiful, melancholic portrait of the Edwardian age on its own, and a fitting send-off for Harry Flashman. Read it, but don't be surprised if you feel a little choked up at the end.
Zadora
Disclaimer: Fraser was a force of nature and his works are generally some of the funniest things that I have ever read. This one doesn't seem to be very popular. I suspect that is because this is a story that is anything but funny. Remember the old John Wayne Movie, "The Shootist".....creating depression is art too, and incredible depression is serious art but I can only assimilate limited quantities of it. Usually Fraser sneaks the sadness carefully as in the last Flashman novel concerning the Ethiopian Campaign of 1868. Reading Mr. American reminded me of taking off on a cross-country road trip with no music save an Eight Track of Disintegration by the Cure.
Braendo
Honestly, it took me awhile after i finished this book to know how i felt about it. its not an action or adventure novel. it's not historical mystery or romance. it's more than all of that. the protagonist is one of those rare people that not only wins the lottery but is able to keep his head and make the most of it. his dreams do come true but in this novel, like life, "there is no happily ever after". the story keeps evolving, the world keeps going, and people keep being who they are... years after i finished it I'm still thinking about it. that in my book is worth 5 stars.
Wizer
I liked this book. It was completely foreign to the Flashman series, but still an enjoyable read. I've always admired the way Fraser tied in fact and fiction to make his characters believable and lovable.
Rainshaper
It's late summer 1909 in Liverpool and a Yank steps off the boat from America. Mark Franklin is an authentic Westerner, his luggage containing Stetson, saddle, gun belt and two .44 Remington pistols.
I've been to England many times, and I love it. Unfortunately, my family's roots are not in the UK, nor have I had the longed-for opportunity to take up permanent residence there. In MR. AMERICAN, it's Franklin's great good luck to have made a fortune from a Nevada silver mine. This allows him to return to England in search of his roots - his forebears having immigrated to the Colonies hundreds of years before - and purchase the house, Manor Lancing, which dominates the Lincolnshire village of his ancestors, Castle Lancing.
I learned in English Lit 1A that every novel incorporates a conflict, which, in MR. AMERICAN, is subtle. To modern fiction readers, fed a steady diet of lurid murders-most-foul, global conspiracies, and courtroom duels, it may not seem like much of a conflict at all. Author George MacDonald Fraser, a Brit himself, has chosen to introduce into Edwardian society of pre- WWI England a rugged individualist matured in the late-19th century American West, and develop what happens. The WASP values that Franklin possesses from such a background - chivalry, self-reliance, forthrightness, loyalty, lack of class pretension, suspicion of authority - are occasionally at odds with the upper class social circle that soon adopts him.
For the reader, Mark will present as an appealing, stand-up fellow. The book is populated with interesting characters: Samson, Franklin's gentleman's gentleman; Pip, the effervescent West End stage actress; King Edward VII; Lady Helen Cessford, the militant suffragette; Peggy, the daughter of an impoverished country squire; Kid Curry, the unwelcome visitor from Franklin's ... um, shall we say, irregular past. And above all, there's the outrageous and aging rascal, General Harry Flashman, the hero of a whole other series of books by author Fraser.
I was undecided for a bit on the number of stars to award this novel - 3 or 4. At almost 600 pages, it isn't the type of book that keeps one riveted. The dramatic moments are occasional and of short duration, and there are a lot of loose ends that would have made an absorbing sequel inasmuch as the storyline ends in 1914 with the outbreak of the war. (Since MR. AMERICAN was published in 1981, no sequel has been written to my knowledge. Pity.) In the final reckoning, I gave it four stars because it's about an American who finds "home" and adventure of sorts in a green and pleasant land. I'm envious.