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by Angela Davis-Gardner

eBook Butterfly's Child: A Novel download ISBN: 038534094X
Author: Angela Davis-Gardner
Publisher: The Dial Press; First Edition edition (March 8, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 352
ePub: 1965 kb
Fb2: 1874 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: azw lit rtf txt
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

I began reading Angela Davis-Gardner’s novel Butterfly’s Child in August 2010, on a family trip to Ireland. Davis-Gardner tells his enthralling story in a complex but tightly knit novel that is entrancing to read, beautiful to remember.

I began reading Angela Davis-Gardner’s novel Butterfly’s Child in August 2010, on a family trip to Ireland. My expectation, honestly, was that I would dip in for a few pages and move on. I was comically wrong. Fred Chappell, former poet laureate of North Carolina and author of I Am One of You Forever Butterfly’s Child is one of the finest books by a living writer that I have read in years.

Butterfly's Child book. This is a masterpiece. Angela Davis-Gardner's story of what happens after the last aria of Madame Butterfly is poignant and beautifully crafted. As a reader, I felt I'd traveled through time to meet and observe these characters whom Puccini named and compelled to sing, but whom Davis-Gardner brings to life in ways that surprise and satisfy.

Butterfly’s Child reveals, in ways both devastating and surprising, how the human heart and the world we live in. .

Butterfly’s Child reveals, in ways both devastating and surprising, how the human heart and the world we live in are rarely as they appear. Davis-Gardner enlightens us with her subtle insights and startles us with one major surprise, in this touching story of an Asian mother who sacrifices everything for her child. David Guy, author of Jake Fades and The Autobiography of My Body. The author allows time for rich detail of place, personalities, and historical events.

Angela Davis-Gardner& Butterfly& Child is a tale of love gone wrong, and of an innocent child caught up in the thoughtless actions of adults around him. BUTTERFLY'S CHILD by Angela Davis-Gardner. BUTTERFLY'S CHILD by Angela Davis-Gardner - literary fiction with a narrative that spans from Japan to Chicago. When three-year-old Benji is plucked from the security of his home in Nagasaki to live with his American father, Lt. Benjamin Franklin Pinkerton, and stepmother,. Just like Madame Butterfly before it, Butterfly’s Child is a tragic tale, but it’s one that will keep you turning pages in hopes of a better future for Benji.

Butterfly's Child: A Novel. by Angela Davis-Gardner. I just finished Butterfly's Child. I was surprised to discover that this book is the continuation of the story of Madame Butterfly. Don’t miss the exclusive conversation between Angela Davis-Gardner and Jennifer Egan at the back of the book. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. I found the first 100 pages of the book difficult, not because they weren't written well, because they were, but because I didn't like any of the characters and that included the unfortunate little boy.

Angela Davis-Gardner. Though the air was sunny, a soft rain rustled the leaves outside Keast’s window. If Isobel were here, they would go for a drive and look for a rainbow, but somehow he couldn’t stir from his chair was content enough-churc. If Isobel were here, they would go for a drive and look for a rainbow, but somehow he couldn’t stir from his chair was content enough-church was over, and an afternoon of leisure lay before him. He was whittling aimlessly, waiting to see what form would emerge from the block of cherry he was working. Maybe he would give it to Miss Ladu, though he didn’t know what Isobel would think about that. There was a knock on the door.

by. Angela Davis-Gardner. Illegitimate children - Fiction, Illinois - Fiction, Identity (Psychology) - Fiction, San Francisco (Calif. - - Fiction, Japan - Fiction.

Butterfly's Child eclipsed my own life while I was feverishly immersed in it.

Butterfly's Child eclipsed my own life while I was feverishly immersed in it, and dominated my mood and thoughts long after I'd finished. -JENNIFER EGAN, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of A Visit from the Goon Squad "The kind of book you sink into, becoming so transfixed by the story that you cannot help devouring it in just a few sittings. -Fred Chappell, former poet laureate of North Carolina and author of I Am One of You Forever. Butterfly's Child is one of the finest books by a living writer that I have read in years.

When three-year-old Benji is plucked from the security of his home in Nagasaki to live with his American father, Lt.

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When three-year-old Benji is plucked from the security of his home in Nagasaki to live with his American father, Lt. Benjamin Franklin Pinkerton, and stepmother, Kate, on their farm in Illinois, the family conceals Benji’s true identity as a child born from a liaison between an officer and a geisha, and instead tells everyone that he is an orphan.Frank struggles to keep the farm going while coping with his guilt and longing for the deceased Butterfly. Deeply devout Kate is torn between her Christian principles and her resentment of raising another woman’s child. And Benji’s life as an outcast—neither fully American nor fully Japanese—forces him to forge an identity far from the life he has known. When the truth about Benji surfaces, it will splinter this family’s fragile dynamic, sending repercussions spiraling through their close-knit rural community and sending Benji on the journey of a lifetime from Illinois to the Japanese settlements in Denver and San Francisco, then across the ocean to Nagasaki, where he will uncover the truth about his mother’s tragic death.A sweeping portrait of a changing American landscape at the end of the nineteenth century, and of a Japanese culture irrevocably altered by foreign influence, Butterfly’s Child explores people in transition—from old worlds to new customs, heart’s desires to vivid realities—in an epic tale that plays out as both a conclusion to and an inspiration for one of the most famous love stories ever told.
Comments: (7)
WOGY
As a child born in Japan to an American soldier and a Japanese lady, I could relate to everything Benji was going through. My dad to leave us behind because she was considered a "war bride". Luckily for my mother and me, he re-entered the army and asked to return to Japan. He came back for us and had to to do paperwork to ask permission to get married and be recognized by the US Government to bring us back to the US as a family. I also felt discrimination while on my granny's farm in West Virginia for two years, being called "Jap" and "yellow skinned". By the way, I loved the writing and the story unfolding as it did.
Kadar
Butterfly's Child: A Novel is an engrossing retelling of Madame Butterfly. The story progresses quickly, and I immediately found I couldn't put it down. The characters were interesting and full of depth, and their world seemed very real, making it easy to get lost in the story. As I find with any novel having good character development, the characters stayed with me after I finished the book, and missing them even made it hard to dive wholeheartedly into my next read.

It wasn't a perfect novel; the ending was a bit heavy handed, though I was admittedly surprised by it. Like other reviewers, I was turned off by the play-within-a-novel idea: an awkward and unlikely detail involving a main character who attends a performance of a popular international play (Madame Butterfly) to find he is watching the retelling of an excerpt from his own life.

Despite relinquishing a bit of sophistication by hitting the reader over the head with the Madame Butterfly concept at the end, the novel provoked some interesting thoughts. It raised questions about identity, culture, and whether it's possible to know what is truly best for another person. What the novel may have lacked in sophistication was made up for by its rich stories and characters.
Unnis
The author has given us an insightful view of the life of a mixed race child in middle America in the early 1900's. In addition, Benji's adoptive father is secretly in fact his biological father. His biological mother had killed herself in Japan. Butterfly's Child delivers a nuanced insight into the struggles of each of her characters. The insular attitude of a small town is portrayed such that the reader may visualize the delicate shivers of judge mental society women.
I don't believe the book needs the device of a reselling of Madame Butterfly. At the point that Puccini's opera becomes known to these characters as a story based on their real lives, the novel jumps a gap of credulity that just bothered me to the end of the story. While the chapters set in Japan portrayed an interesting view of the Floating World, I found the final twists again stretched the story too far.
So I have a mixed review. This writer has given us some fine character portrayals, and I wish she had skipped the opera device.
Urreur
Absolutely loved this book and recommend it highly. The author has done meticulous research about both Japan and the American Midwest in the late 19th and early 20th century. It is a continuation to the tragic ending of Madama Butterfly. I attended a spectacular performance of the opera the same weekend I read the book!! What a great weekend it was.
VariesWent
This is the story of Madame Butterfly and her child, whom she gives to his father by committing Hari Kari. That is what we know or think we know from the Opera. We get Pinkerton's back story, Kate Pinkerton struggling to raise Butterfly's Child and the childhood and adulthood of Benji Pinkerton. Many twists and turns and sadness in this unconventional approach to what happens once the curtain falls. Familiarity with the opera is helpful but not necessary to enjoying this book. It was on the list of books for the Arizona Opera Book Club, since we are doing Madama Butterfly in late January, 2017.
Shaktiktilar
This opera has always moved me to tears - not because of Pinkerton and Butterfly's doomed love but because of Butterfly's loss of her son. The book's reimagining of the story changed every aspect but one - the heart of the tragedy of a young mother's desperate love for her son. This retelling is no less heart wrenching for all its "happy" outcomes. Every action has consequences and the innocent still suffer.
Shezokha
Having just enjoyed Madama Butterfly by Seattle Opera (amazing production!), I spotted this in their advert. Clever idea to follow Butterfly and Pinkerton's son to the midwest for a sad growing up tale (no surprise there), but the plot is rather weak and the book is overwritten. Some nice details about Japan (gather the author has lived there) but I forced myself to complete the story, more curiosity than interest.