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eBook A Voyage to Arcturus download

by David Lindsay

eBook A Voyage to Arcturus download ISBN: 1434102238
Author: David Lindsay
Publisher: Waking Lion Press (January 8, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 284
ePub: 1589 kb
Fb2: 1924 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: txt azw mbr docx
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Produced by An Anonymous Volunteer, and David Widger. A voyage to arcturus. Ah, you should not have mentioned my unfortunate book. An old publicservant is merely amusing himself in his retirement, Mr. Backhouse

Produced by An Anonymous Volunteer, and David Widger. Chapter 1. THE SÉANCE. Backhouse. Youhave no cause for alarm-I have studied in the school of discretion.

A Voyage to Arcturus is a novel by the Scottish writer David Lindsay, first published in 1920. It combines fantasy, philosophy, and science fiction in an exploration of the nature of good and evil and their relationship with existence

A Voyage to Arcturus is a novel by the Scottish writer David Lindsay, first published in 1920. It combines fantasy, philosophy, and science fiction in an exploration of the nature of good and evil and their relationship with existence. Described by critic, novelist, and philosopher Colin Wilson as the "greatest novel of the twentieth century", it was a central influence on C. S. Lewis' Space Trilogy, and through him on J. R. Tolkien, who said he read the book "with avidity"

This is a book that few will ever try to read and fewer will finish. But I think there will always be some who attempt the journey and preservere to the end. It's one of the few reading experiences that I'd call "unique".

Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). This is a book that few will ever try to read and fewer will finish.

LibriVox recording of A Voyage to Arcturus by David Lindsay. A Voyage to Arcturus is a novel by Scottish writer David Lindsay, first published in 1920. It has been described by critic and philosopher Colin Wilson as the "greatest novel of the twentieth century" and was a central influence on C. Lewis's Space Trilogy.

David Lindsay was a Scottish author now most famous for the philosophical science fiction novel A Voyage to Arcturus. Lindsay was born into a middle-class Scottish Calvinist family who had moved to London, tho growing up he spent much time in Jedburgh, where his family was from. Altho awarded a university scholarship, he was forced by poverty to enter business, becoming a Lloyd's of London insurance clerk. He was very successful but, after serving in WWI, at age forty, he moved to Cornwall with his young wife, Jacqueline Silver, to become a full-time writer.

On hearing the title A Voyage to Arcturus, one might picture an astronaut strapping themselves into a rocket and flying into space for a swashbuckling adventure

On hearing the title A Voyage to Arcturus, one might picture an astronaut strapping themselves into a rocket and flying into space for a swashbuckling adventure. Nothing could be further from what this book actually is. Voyage is in fact a fascinating, bizarre, bewildering, and thought-provoking sort of acid-fueled Pilgrim’s Progress: a philosophical allegory told through the frame of a psychadelic gender-bending journey to an alien planet. After a terrifying seance, the protagonist, Maskull, is offered the chance of an adventure on a different world.

A stunning achievement in speculative fiction, A Voyage to Arcturus has inspired, enchanted, and unsettled readers for decades. It is simultaneously an epic quest across one of the most unusual and brilliantly depicted alien worlds ever conceived, a profoundly moving journey of discovery into the metaphysical heart of the universe, and a shockingly intimate excursion into what makes us human and unique. After a strange interstellar journey, Maskull, a man from Earth, awakens alone in a desert on the planet Tormance, seared by the suns of the binary star Arcturus.

Author: David Lindsay.

A Voyage to Arcturus is a novel by Scottish writer David Lindsay. First published in 1920, it combines fantasy, philosophy, and science fiction in an exploration of the nature of good and evil and their relationship with existence. The book has been described by the critic and philosopher Colin Wilson as the "greatest novel of the twentieth century," and it was a central influence on C. S. Lewis's Space Trilogy. The strange lands visited in the novel represent philosophical systems, or states of mind, through which the main character, Maskull, passes on his search for the meaning of life. Longing for adventure, Maskull accepts an invitation from Krag, an acquaintance of his friend Nightspore, to travel to Tormance. The three set off from an abandoned observatory in Scotland, but Maskull finds himself alone on Tormance, a planet of Arcturus. In every land he passes through, he usually meets only one or two people, and these meetings often end in their deaths. Then, learning of his own impending death, he meets Krag again but learns that he himself is Nightspore. The book concludes with a final revelation from Krag (who claims to be known on Earth as "pain") to Nightspore about the nature and origin of the Universe.
Comments: (7)
Wire
This is a seminal science fiction/fantasy novel that sold a mere 600 copies from its original print run, yet somehow those copies made their way into the hands of influential writers and critics. J.R.R. Tolkien was an admirer, and C.S. Lewis was evidently deeply influenced by this book. Later editions inspired horror writer Clive Barker and literary theorist Harold Bloom.

Lindsay is not nearly so entertaining a writer as any of his more famous admirers. He is is dour, serious, and stubbornly unconcerned with the reader's need for things to make sense. Maskull the protagonist is on a quest with no particular goal. He goes from place to place and in each place his character changes radically for no apparent reason. Lindsay has a reason, but he's not letting the reader in on it, not even to extent of hinting that the reason exists.

It's all extremely off-putting and at first it seems like a long slog through bad writing. And in truth Lindsay does have his limitations as a writer, especially in rendering the exotic landscape of the alien planet. But after a while the book begins to exert a peculiar fascination. It's not *bad* writing; that's frustrating you, it's a bad attitude; an author who is totally uncompromising and unsentimental. He relentlessly frustrates the protagonist's attempts to make sense of the alien world Tormance while he relentlessly frustrates your attempts to make sense of the protagonist.

Then when he's done with us, Lindsay sweeps it all off the table. The journey he's subjected us to has ultimately had only one point: to demonstrate that while some human ideals may be beautiful and others repulsive, they're all equally futile. What we really long for is actually beyond human experience. It's not exactly a cheerful point of view, but it's delivered with integrity.

This is a book that few will ever try to read and fewer will finish. But I think there will always be some who attempt the journey and preservere to the end. It's one of the few reading experiences that I'd call "unique"
Anaragelv
A science fiction masterpiece. Complex, psychological and very much a philosophers journey into a parallel planet.
Imagine ( or read, as the human visitor to this place ) a beautiful unspoiled planet with two suns ( vividly described) inhabited by beings that communicate by thought , capable of exerting moral authority without force.
Many (famous) writers have copied, and failed to achieve the magic of this story. Before now, I would have placed
Asimov as the premier scifi writer. Well. make that Lindsay!
Wrathshaper
A Victorian-age man is swept to another planet, traveling through different regions there to understand the meaning of life. Turns out, the meaning of life is simply the author's nihilistic Demiurge philosophy. Understandable given a Brit who'd just endured World War I, but no profound insights unless you think acknowledging the world is full of pain is one. Look up Demiurge on Wikipedia to understand the underlying metaphysical theme ... but then you'll already know more, and more coherently, than this book will reveal.

A torturously slow, simplistic, disjointed read with a disappointing non-ending ... which is why it didn't sell when originally released in 1920. It isn't a good story and it isn't good philosophy. For sci-fi historians only, because its metaphysical musings delivered via a fantasy vehicle influenced C.S. Lewis and his Space Trilogy. My only guess is those who love it do so simply because it supports their own feelings that the world doesn't make sense and is full of pain, and theological desire to explain it via the Demiurge approach to the nature of God and the Why Is There Evil question. But Wikipedia does it better.

Especially annoyed by the "best book of the 20th century" quote marketing. Unbelievable. Out of copyright, so also available free, but don't be fooled by the first 10% which is decent - it goes downhill from there. This is like choosing to read Nietzsche ... for pleasure. Or spending hours viewing Rothko ... for artistic insight. Ain't gonna happen. It's extremely rare for me to pan a book, but this one qualifies for an "act of mercy" warning to normal readers just looking for a good story ... because life is short.
Marige
I first read this book in high school roughly 45 years ago. It was one of my very favorites then. I reread it recently to see if it was only my inexperience and limited world view that caused me to like it so much. It wasn't. If anything, it improved significantly with the passage of time. One thing I didn't realize then (or now, until I googled it) is that it was written around the turn of the century. Unbelievable. It has such a modern feel I would have thought it was of recent vintage. It holds up amazingly well over all this time. If you've ever been confused about morality, mortality, or the meaning of life, you really should read this book.