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by P.J. O'Rourke,Thomas Vinciguerra

eBook Backward Ran Sentences: The Best of Wolcott Gibbs from the New Yorker download ISBN: 1608195503
Author: P.J. O'Rourke,Thomas Vinciguerra
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA (October 11, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 688
ePub: 1429 kb
Fb2: 1358 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lrf txt azw docx
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Essays and Correspondence

Wolcott Gibbs, born in 1902, began working at the New Yorker in 1927. Gibbs died at the age of 56 on Fire Island.

Wolcott Gibbs, born in 1902, began working at the New Yorker in 1927.

The book aims to revive interest in this unjustly neglected figure from the magazine’s past in the same way that Up in the Old Hotel introduced a new generation of readers to the work of Joseph Mitchell. Vinciguerra kindly agreed to answer a few questions about Gibbs’s life and career. How did you first come to read the work of Wolcott Gibbs? I first heard of him at age twelve, when I came across him in The Guinness Book of World Records.

Backward Ran Sentences book. In Backward Ran Sentences, journalist Thomas Vinciguerra provides a biographical sketch of Gibbs and gathers a generous sampling of his finest work across an impressive range of genres, bringing a brilliant, multitalented writer of incomparable wit to a new age of readers. Praise for Wolcott Gibbs: "His style had brilliance that was never flashy, he was self-critical as well as critical, and he had absolute pitch, which enabled him to become a parodist of the first rank. B. White, New Yorker, 1958.

Backward Ran Sentences - Thomas Vinciguerra. Backward ran sentences until reeled the mind Wolcott Gibbs was probably the greatest forgotten writer that ever helped keep the New Yorker of the 30’s and 40’s afloat. A prose stylist who loved words but believed more strongly, often in a very laconic way, about content, and would tell you exactly what he felt - the hell with what you felt.

And, for over thirty years at the magazine, Gibbs did do just about everything

And, for over thirty years at the magazine, Gibbs did do just about everything.

He is best remembered for his 1936 parody of Time magazine, which skewered the magazine's inverted narrative structure

In Backward Ran Sentences, journalist Tom Vinciguerra introduces Gibbs and gathers a generous sampling of his finest work across an impressive range of genres, bringing a brilliant, multitalented writer of incomparable wit to a new age of readers.

In Backward Ran Sentences, journalist Tom Vinciguerra introduces Gibbs and gathers a generous sampling of his finest work across an impressive range of genres, bringing a brilliant, multitalented writer of incomparable wit to a new age of readers. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning book critic Jonathan Yardley of The Washington Post selected the latter volume as one of his 11 best books of 2011. In November 2015, he published the original volume Cast of.

He lives on Long Island. Country of Publication. Literature, Poetry & Criticism.

"Maybe he doesn't like anything, but he can do everything," New Yorker editor Harold Ross once said of the magazine's brilliantly sardonic theater critic Wolcott Gibbs. And, for over thirty years at the magazine, Gibbs did do just about everything. He turned out fiction and nonfiction, profiles and parodies, filled columns in "The Talk of the Town" and "Notes and Comment," covered books, movies, nightlife, and, of course, the theater. A friend of the Algonquin Round Table, Gibbs was renowned for his humor. (Perhaps his most enduring line is from a profile of Henry Luce, parodying Time magazine's house style: "Backward ran sentences until reeled the mind.")

In his day, Gibbs was equal in stature to E. B. White and James Thurber, but he is little read today. In Backward Ran Sentences, journalist Thomas Vinciguerra provides a biographical sketch of Gibbs and gathers a generous sampling of his finest work across an impressive range of genres, bringing a brilliant, multitalented writer of incomparable wit to a new age of readers.

Praise for Wolcott Gibbs:

"His style had brilliance that was never flashy, he was self-critical as well as critical, and he had absolute pitch, which enabled him to become a parodist of the first rank."-E. B. White, New Yorker, 1958

Comments: (5)
Awene
Wolcott Gibbs was the sardonic heart and soul of The New Yorker during its glory years. He could and did write almost anything required of him. His writing was always well-crafted, pithy, and often barbed. He excelled in the shorter form of fiction and features demanded of magazine writers. This book also includes his short stories, a literary form in which he was competent but less successful. But as a general writer for magazines, there were few better in the mid-twentieth century. He is a wordsmith whose style is well worth studying.
Whitehammer
Wollcott Gibbs is a wonderful writer. I just wish there were more.
Renthadral
Loved this book. What a writer! Too bad nobody knows of him anymore. A true pleasure.
Silvermaster
good copy as advertised.
Kulabandis
For all his surliness, Gibbs was a thoughtful and perceptive critic and, especially given the deadlines he faced, a superb writer. He was also, of course, not just funny but witty, and this compendium presents him at his best. Recommended without reservation to literates everywhere.