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eBook Red: The Next Generation of American Writers--Teenage Girls--On What Fires Up Their Lives Today download

by Amy Goldwasser

eBook Red: The Next Generation of American Writers--Teenage Girls--On What Fires Up Their Lives Today download ISBN: 1594630402
Author: Amy Goldwasser
Publisher: Hudson Street Press; 1st Edition edition (November 8, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1262 kb
Fb2: 1118 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: doc lrf azw mbr
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Essays and Correspondence

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Red: The Next Generation of American Writers-Teenage Girls-On What Fires Up Their Lives Today as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This is the best book I’ve ever read that gives one a rare and true glimpse into the hearts and minds of teenage girls today! The book is a bridge that allows moms to cross over into the lives of their daughters in ways never before documented. The cover of this book called to me-especially this line of the subtitle: /the next generation of great American writers-teenage girls.

There’s Listen Up: Voices from the Next Feminist Generation (with a beautifully written, profound short piece by the . The girls in Red are often gifted writers

There’s Listen Up: Voices from the Next Feminist Generation (with a beautifully written, profound short piece by the teenage Curtis Sittenfeld that made me think, This writer is going to be very famous someday, but then she disappeared and reemerged after years of teaching in Washington . The girls in Red are often gifted writers. They come, Goldwasser tells us, from the first generation of writers, what with their incessant texting and blogging and e-mailing. She reports that most of them wrote in about weight and body image issues (wow, how ! A revelation!

Red : Teenage Girls in America Write on What Fires up Their Lives Today.

Red : Teenage Girls in America Write on What Fires up Their Lives Today. For every teen girl who thinks she's alone, and every adult who's dared to try to figure her out, comes this eye-opening collection in the spirit of New York Times bestseller Ophelia Speaks.

This generation's unprecedented comfort level with the written word has led to a. .

This generation's unprecedented comfort level with the written word has led to a fearless new American literature. A vivid portrait of what it means to be a teenage girl in America today, from 58 of the country's finest, most credentialed writers on the subject.

It's how you conduct your friendships and present yourself to the world. Every day, you're creating a formidable body of personal written work. Ranging in age from 13 to 19, and hailing from Park Avenue to rural Nevada, Georgia to Hawaii, the girls in RED-whose essays were selected from more than 800 ent a diverse spectrum of socioeconomic, political, racial, and religious backgrounds, creating a rich portrait of life as a teen girl in America today.

Teenagers today read and write for fun; it's part of their social lives. We need to start trusting our kids to communicate as they will online - even when that comes with the risk that they'll spill the family secrets or campaign for a candidate who's not ours. MORE FROM Amy Goldwasser.

Recommended Books featuring teens as writers. Peeled by Joan Bauer (Putnam, 2008) (teen journalists in ethical competition with local paper). Big Fat Manifesto by Susan Vaught (Bloomsbury, 2008) (teen columnist for her school newspaper). Destroy All Cars by Blake Nelson (Scholastic, May 2009) (essays for English class and personal). Hold Still by Nina LaCour (Dutton, October 2009) (personal journal of suicide victim). Books with teen writers featured in other podcasts.

Readergirlz is a great program, so I’m truly honored that I and the other Red girls get to be a part of it! Thanks, Readergirlz! January 20, 2008.

A vivid portrait of what it means to be a teenage girl in America today, from 58 of the country's finest, most credentialed writers on the subject If you're a teenage girl today, you live your life in words-in text and instant messages, on blogs and social network pages. It's how you conduct your friendships and present yourself to the world. Every day, you're creating a formidable body of personal written work. This generation's unprecedented comfort level with the written word has led to a fearless new American literature. These collected essays, at last, offer a key to understanding the inscrutable teenage girl-one of the most mislabeled and underestimated members of society, argues editor and writer Amy Goldwasser, whose work has appeared in Seventeen, Vogue, The New York Times, and The New Yorker. And while psychologists and other experts have tried to explain the teen girl in recent years, no book since Ophelia Speaks has given her the opportunity to speak for herself-until now. In this eye-opening collection, nearly sixty teenage girls from across the country speak out, writing about everything from post-Katrina New Orleans to Johnny Depp; from learning to rock climb to starting a rock band; from the loneliness of losing a best friend to the loathing or pride they feel about their bodies. Ranging in age from 13 to 19, and hailing from Park Avenue to rural Nevada, Georgia to Hawaii, the girls in RED-whose essays were selected from more than 800 contributions-represent a diverse spectrum of socioeconomic, political, racial, and religious backgrounds, creating a rich portrait of life as a teen girl in America today. Revealing the complicated inner lives, humor, hopes, struggles, thrills, and obsessions of this generation, RED ultimately provides today's teen girl with much-needed community, perspective, and validation-and helps the rest of us to better understand her.
Comments: (7)
Pemand
What a delight. Many here say it's a must read for mothers and daughters. I have no daughter--but I was one once (long ago). It brought back so many memories of my own past: dreams, aspirations and heartaches all. It is good to be reminded. I was struck by the skill and honesty of the writing and am so glad Amy Goldwasser had the inspiration to gather together such a collection from such honest and courageous young women. Accolades to all. I also believe that as soon as you read it, you'll want to share it with a friend--it's that kind of book.
skyjettttt
I really looked forward to reading Red with my 12-year old daughter, and I was not disappointed! Each day after school we would settle in and then take turns reading the essays. Some were funny, some sad and some heartbreaking, but all felt very true and real. I feel fortunate to have had a unique opportunity to share this book with my pre-teen daughter as now I am much better prepared to understand the teen girl psyche. But more than that, reading these words together has created a deeper sense of trust and intimacy and I feel my daughter will not be scared or reluctant to talk to me about some of these issues in the future. I would love to see a book of essays by these girls when they turn 21. This is a book that should be read enthusiastically for its honesty and its heart.
SlingFire
I liked this book very much - it was honest, straightforward and diverse in its topics. It was well-written and well-edited, and is now being left around for our 11yo daughter to pick up.
Vetibert
From the introduction by editor Amy Goldwasser, Red: The Next Generation of American Writers provides countless insights about today's adolescent women, through the eyes of 58 essayists from around the U.S.
Goldwasser, a long-time editor and free-lance writer, culled the collection from more than 800 entries she received after sending out an e-mail to a group of friends, asking them to put her in touch with teen-age girls who might be interested in contributing to a collection of essays. She edited very little and found the essays fell into eight, natural categories: body image (the vast majority of essays fell into this category), family, school, friendships, crushes and sex, extracurricular, media and pop culture and a chapter she subtitled "Battle Cries."
"As opposed to a collection held together by adult writers on a single theme," Goldwasser writes, "the essays in Red have, really, only one thing in common. It's their heart."
Indeed, these girls open their hearts wide, pouring out love and anger and frustration and attitude in a riotous, ever-widening stream of consciousness. Some voices seem polished and thoughtful, others carve words from raw emotion. They discuss subjects as intimate as a sexual relationship, as excruciating as suicide attempts and eating disorders, as touching as a tribute to a lost friend and as hysterically funny as the kind of incomprehensible behavior that comes with having a crush.
Three of the essays come from Michigan girls, including twins Hannah and Sarah Morris, who confront not only their similarities, but their differences. Though biologically identical, they seem quite different in outlook and voice; according to Sarah, they look different as well. She worries about her sister's weight and the toll she believes it will take in the future. Hannah focuses more attention on their family relationships and what it means to be a twin. What they share in sisterhood, however, far outshines any differences.
These glimpses into the hearts of young women show us not only how today's generation differs in its dependence on technology and its powerful impact on relationships and education, but also how much these young women share with previous generations. We all fell in love with boy-out-of-reach, we all came to terms with our first bras, we all loved/hated our mothers.
And in Red, we now have a platform upon which to share these memories, these bits and pieces of the female collective.
Lcena
Having an essay published in this book, it's hard for me to be un-biased about it. But the book is great. Really, truly amazing. There are so many different stories, so many different voices in this book that it's hard to not talk about particular essays. So I won't even try.
I loved the essay "Curve" about a girl who's always been "the skinny girl" because I've always been that girl too and we always hear about the trials so-called fat girls go through, but never the other side of the coin. In our nothing-is-off-limits culture, talking about how you're too skinny is definitely taboo. But it's addressed here anyways, and in a phenomenal way.
I also loved the essay "The Hamptons" about spending summer in the Hamptons. It wasn't an oh-I'm-so-rich-I-go-to-the-Hamptons type of story, but just about spending summer getting tan, reading books, and hanging out with a cousin who can be more like a sister than anything else.
I loved "The Dial Life - and Him", because it approached the issues of God, faith, spirituality, and fairness in a way that really spoke to me, and probably to a lot of other people. It's one of the longest essays in the book, and I've read it probably four times. It's just that amazing.

Read this book.
Direbringer
I felt that this book connected my mom and me a little more. Before we started reading "Red" together, I thought she didn't understand the life of a teenage girl very well, in my case a pre-teen. (Life for us girls can be pretty difficult, and there is this wonderful book to prove just that.) Once we finished all the funny, sad, and interesting essays, I think my mom better understood the lives of young girls today, and I saw that I wasn't alone in some of my experiences, especially at school and with friends. After reading this book I realized how different girls can be and I think I understand why they act the way they do. I know I will read this book again when I get older. I <3 Red!