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eBook Up in the Old Hotel and Other Stories download

by Joseph Mitchell

eBook Up in the Old Hotel and Other Stories download ISBN: 0679412638
Author: Joseph Mitchell
Publisher: Pantheon; 1st edition (August 4, 1992)
Language: English
Pages: 718
ePub: 1754 kb
Fb2: 1881 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lit doc lrf rtf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Essays and Correspondence

Home Joseph Mitchell Up in the Old Hotel. now had the freedom to immerse himself in his stories, spending weeks or even months with his subjects, watching and listening.

Home Joseph Mitchell Up in the Old Hotel. Written between 1943 and 1965, Up in the Old Hotel is the complete collection of Joseph Mitchell’s New Yorker journalism and includes McSorley’s Wonderful Saloon, Old Mr Flood, The Bottom of the Harbour and Joe Gould’s Secret. There was this anomaly,’ he would say, much later.

In the pages of Up In the Old Hotel, the reader .

In the pages of Up In the Old Hotel, the reader passes through places such as McSorley's Old Ale House or the Fulton Fish Market that many observers might have found ordinary. But when experienced through Mitchell's gifted eye, the reader will see that these haunts of old New York possess poetry, beauty, and meaning. From Publishers Weekly. As others have mentioned, the Joe Gould essay is as poignant and fascinating as essays get. When I had first heard of Mitchell and his milieu, the words grittiness and realism always seemed to be the adjectives surrounding his work.

Joseph Mitchell was born near Iona, North Carolina, in 1908, and came to New York City in 1929, when he was twenty-one years old. He eventually found a job as an apprentice crime reporter for The World. He also worked as a reporter and features writer at The Herald Tribune and The World-Telegram before landing at The New Yorker in 1938, where he remained until his death in 1996.

Lists with This Book. I Love New York City.

One of his colleagues, Calvin Trillin, dedicated a book to him, stating "To the New Yorker reporter who set the standard-Joseph Mitchell.

Up in the Old Hotel had its beginnings in the nineteen-thirties, in the hopelessness of the early days of the Great Depression, when Joseph Mitchell, at that. One of his colleagues, Calvin Trillin, dedicated a book to him, stating "To the New Yorker reporter who set the standard-Joseph Mitchell.

The book opens with a description of a saloon named "McSorley's. The saloon was probably the oldest in operation in the city at the time of the writing and the author, Joseph Mitchell, described the place and the regular customers in detail

The book opens with a description of a saloon named "McSorley's. The saloon was probably the oldest in operation in the city at the time of the writing and the author, Joseph Mitchell, described the place and the regular customers in detail. The Up in the Old Hotel and Other Stories Study Pack contains: Up in the Old Hotel and Other Stories Study Guide.

In his introductory note, Joseph Mitchell notes that his stories are characterized by something he calls graveyard humor, which, he goes on to say, is an exemplification of the way I look at the world. It typifies my cast of mind. 10. The pieces in Up in the Old Hotel, especially those from McSorley's, defy the bounds of political correctness or, really, ignore them, since the notion of political correctness didn't exist when Mitchell was writing.

Аудиокнига "Up in the Old Hotel, and Other Stories", Joseph Mitchell. Читает Grover Gardner. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

In Joseph Mitchell's feature Up in the Old Hotel, Mitchell explores the Fulton Fish Market of New York, specifically Sloppy Louie's Restaurant

In Joseph Mitchell's feature Up in the Old Hotel, Mitchell explores the Fulton Fish Market of New York, specifically Sloppy Louie's Restaurant. He features the owner of the space, and explores the character in full before adventuring up the old elevator shaft with Louie and exploring the abandoned and sectioned-off old hotel space. In his opening, Mitchell surveys the personality of the man he has this experience with, setting the mood for the entire piece

Up in the Old Hotel collects all of the stories Mitchell wrote in this manner, for The New Yorker, from between 1943 and 1964.

Up in the Old Hotel collects all of the stories Mitchell wrote in this manner, for The New Yorker, from between 1943 and 1964. The book, which runs to 707 pages, is not an insignificant piece of luggage, but it has anyway accompanied me on assignments to Islamabad and Dar es Salaam, as well as to Devon and Northumberland. Writing is presented as an escape from his own cares, and an excursion into the life of others, which has always seemed to me as good a way as any of thinking of it.

Waterfront workers, people on the Bowery, Mohawk Indians working on high structural steel, gypsies, itinerant preachers, and others provide the necessary color for the literary portraits collected in a commemorative tribute to The New Yorker's Joseph Mitchell.
Comments: (7)
Braendo
ah, joseph mitchell...one of the cornerstones upon which the New Yorker was built.

absolutely first rate, timeless writing about all sorts of subjects and a link to a long forgotten and wonderful time in NYC when you could get a 50 cent breakfast at a diner and everybody smoked everywhere and jews on the lower east side sold pickles and the cops were all irish and the women were all dames who weren't allowed in McSorley's . i'm not saying it celebrates sexism, i'm saying it captures new york in the forties and fifties.

mitchell seeks out the lesser known aspects of new york life: gypsy families and lazy hot afternoons in the park and street preachers and kooks.

his writing is graceful and elegant but simple and direct at the same time. just tells it like it is but with flair and no phony 'look at me! i'm a writer!' stuff.
Tcaruieb
I pride myself on the amount of reading I have done about New York City but I have to admit that my experience with Joseph Mitchell was extremely limited. I don't know why. It wasn't intentional; it just happened. So, I finally picked up this book, and now, wow! A part of me is full of regret: I had been missing so much. On the other hand, I am experiencing the writing of this great essayist and storyteller for the first time. And as with everything in life that is pleasurable, the first time is usually the best. I am living it up.

Joseph Mitchell and his people occupied a New York before my time. (Even though he had passed away when I was quite young, he hadn't published much for years because of his infamous writer's block.) What Mitchell presents is the dirt under New York's fingernails. The characters all live on the cliched fringes of the metropolis. And if they weren't the patrons of McSorley's or some dive or flophouse, they were just as iconic as The Empire State Building or a Lower East Side tenement. As others have mentioned, the Joe Gould essay is as poignant and fascinating as essays get.

When I had first heard of Mitchell and his milieu, the words grittiness and realism always seemed to be the adjectives surrounding his work. Immediately, the photographs of the legendary Arthur "Weegee" Fellig came to my mind. However, after reading these tales, this comparison utterly falls on its face. Weegee's works, as much as I admire them, were often staged, and even the ones that weren't have a self-conscious shock value attached. Mitchell's "grittiness" and "realism" is actually naturalist. There is an acceptance, respect and grace to his subjects, and in the writing surrounding the people and places he is describing for us. He had no need to embellish or stage anything. And, for me, a first time reader, this is the biggest source of my enjoyment.

Nice meeting you, Mr. Mitchell. And thanks.
Dorintrius
One of my favorite collections of true stories from NYC in the mid third of the 20th century. Joe Mitchell was one of the most interesting staff writers at the excellent "New Yorker" magazine. Whatever the subject matter of his stories, I am interested in them to the point where I can't put them down. Since first reading this collection upon its initial printing in about 1992, I have visited NYC 7 times just to walk the streets and visit places that he writes about. (I took in a few shows and museums as well). Much of this New York is gone, but sometimes you look down a lower Manhattan street lined with old buildings and one of his stories comes flooding back. McSorley's wonderful saloon is a good example. From stuff found on the bottom of the harbor to exploring the old abandoned hotel of the title story, to the life and culture of city gypsies and climbing an old clock tower or exploring a freedman's 19th century graveyard on Long Island, I love this collection.
Samugul
Mr Mitchell is an amazing storyteller. . The titles are unusual, such as "Mr. Hunter's Grave". And "McSorley's Wonderful Saloon". In all of[
them, it's as if you were there with him and listening to it all. Most of his stories are from the 1930s and 1940s. The date is listed at the
end of each story. I remember visiting Hubert's Museum and Flea Circus on 42nd Street as a Teenager. He describes his visit in
"Lady Olga". True story, the Fleas were real. Do not miss a chance to read this book.
Risky Strong Dromedary
An essential book in any collection. One of the greatest essayists of all time explores his love of New York City and the remarkable characters within, in a loving, graceful, quirky, absolutely unique voyage into the sepia streets and alleys of Manhattan in the first half of the 20th Century. If I had to take only five books with me into the next life, this would be one of them.
Tto
This is a huge collection of Mitchell's writing -- both fiction and non-fiction. I enjoyed the non-fiction much more, but it is all worth reading.

I read it over several weeks, a piece or two at a time, and it was always a pleasure to enter his world. Especially interesting was his piece on Joe Gould, a local character who was supposedly working on a massive work of oral history. In "Professor Sea Gull," Mitchell describes Gould, his project, and his unusual lifestyle. In Mitchell's final published work, "Joe Gould's Secret," he revisits the story after Gould's death. Although he would live thirty more years, it was the last thing Mitchell ever published, making his look into Gould's failure to complete his work even more haunting.

Highly recommended to those who enjoy 20th century history, personal profiles, or excellent writing. Mitchell's style is so graceful and easy to read that it is easy to miss how much of a style it really is.
Melipra
This is one of the masterpieces of American non-fiction. I was having a copy sent to a good friend, a fine writer himself, who had not known of Mitchell or his work before.

Unfortunately, the new paperback copy I ordered for him arrived missing every page, including the table of contents, up to page thirteen, my friend reported on receiving the book. (I photocopied and sent to him the missing pages from my own volume of the same edition. But I think Amazon ought to send him a new copy, with all the pages included.)