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eBook Arguably: Essays by Christopher Hitchens download

by Simon Prebble,Christopher Hitchens

eBook Arguably: Essays by Christopher Hitchens download ISBN: 1619692082
Author: Simon Prebble,Christopher Hitchens
Publisher: Twelve (September 4, 2012)
Language: English
ePub: 1993 kb
Fb2: 1220 kb
Rating: 4.4
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Category: Literature
Subcategory: Essays and Correspondence

Also by christopher hitchens. Hostage to History: Cyprus from the Ottomans to Kissinger.

Also by christopher hitchens. Blood, Class and Nostalgia: Anglo-American Ironies. Published simultaneously in the United States by Twelve, an imprint of Grand Central Publishing.

Christopher Hitchens (Author), Simon Prebble (Narrator), Hachette Audio (Publisher). A masterful collection. Here is Hitchens as dream dinner party guest, slightly sloshed, louche but animated still, a couple of buttons down on the shirt, perspiring, smiling

Christopher Hitchens (Author), Simon Prebble (Narrator), Hachette Audio (Publisher). Get this audiobook plus a second, free. Here is Hitchens as dream dinner party guest, slightly sloshed, louche but animated still, a couple of buttons down on the shirt, perspiring, smiling. His hands move as he makes his point. You have forgotten already about dessert. This Hitchens is still alive and well on the many "Hitch-slapped" compilations put up on YouTube. A large book, to be dipped into when, as Durant said of Nietzsche, you need "a bracing wind across a courtyard after a long and stuffy service in Church".

Christopher Eric Hitchens (13 April 1949 – 15 December 2011) was an English-American author, columnist, essayist, orator, journalist, and social critic. A staple of public discourse, his confrontational style of debate made him both a lauded public intellectual and a controversial public figure.

Written by Christopher Hitchens, Audiobook narrated by Simon Prebble. Arguably: Essays by Christopher Hitchens. By: Christopher Hitchens. Narrated by: Simon Prebble.

Christopher Hitchens: 'an equal opportunities debunker of religious cant'. Photograph: Eamonn McCabe for the Observer. There are, at a rough count, 36 references to George Orwell in this voluminous collection of Christopher Hitchens's journalism from the past decade

Christopher Hitchens: 'an equal opportunities debunker of religious cant'. There are, at a rough count, 36 references to George Orwell in this voluminous collection of Christopher Hitchens's journalism from the past decade.

The first new book of essays by Christopher Hitchens since 2004, Arguably offers an indispensable key to understanding the passionate and skeptical spirit of one of our most dazzling writers, widely admired for the clarity of his style, a result of his disciplined and candid thinking.

The first new book of essays by Christopher Hitchens since 2004, Arguably offers an indispensable key to understanding the passionate and skeptical spirit of one of our most dazzling writers, widely admired for the clarity of his style, a result of his disciplined and candid thinking

Аудиокнига "Arguably: Essays by Christopher Hitchens", Christopher Hitchens. Читает Simon Prebble. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы

Аудиокнига "Arguably: Essays by Christopher Hitchens", Christopher Hitchens. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

The first new collection of essays by Christopher Hitchens since 2004, ARGUABLY offers an indispensable key to understanding the passionate and skeptical spirit of one of our most dazzling writers, widely admired for the clarity of his style, a result of his disciplined and candid thinking. Topics range from ruminations on why Charles Dickens was among the best of writers and the worst of men to the haunting science fiction of J.G. Ballard; from the enduring legacies of Thomas Jefferson and George Orwell to the persistent agonies of anti-Semitism and jihad. Hitchens even looks at the recent financial crisis and argues for arthe enduring relevance of Karl Marx. The audio book forms a bridge between the two parallel enterprises of culture and politics. It reveals how politics justifies itself by culture, and how the latter prompts the former. In this fashion, ARGUABLY burnishes Christopher Hitchens' credentials as-to quote Christopher Buckley-our "greatest living essayist in the English language."
Comments: (7)
monotronik
A masterful collection. Here is Hitchens as dream dinner party guest, slightly sloshed, louche but animated still, a couple of buttons down on the shirt, perspiring, smiling. His hands move as he makes his point. You have forgotten already about dessert. This Hitchens is still alive and well on the many "Hitch-slapped" compilations put up on YouTube.

A large book, to be dipped into when, as Durant said of Nietzsche, you need "a bracing wind across a courtyard after a long and stuffy service in Church". Here is Hitchens on the Kennedy's:

"A new volume by Ed Klein, portentously titled "The Kennedy Curse", revealed the brief marriage of John Kennedy Jr. to Carolyn Bessemer to have been a cauldron of low-level misery, infidelity and addiction": JFK: In Sickness and By Stealth, Times Literary Supplement 2003. . It's the "low-level" that twists the knife here.

The essay on JFK, a review of JFK: An Unfinished Life ("a title portentous and platitudinous at the same time") by Robert Dallek, is undoubtedly the standout star of Part 1 All American, which slightly bizarrely has Hitchens, an Oxbridge educated English privileged public schoolboy and former champagne socialist, writing on historical American figures such as Jefferson, Franklin and Lincoln.

Part 2 has Hitchens on more local ground writing on early and later 20th century English literary figures such as PG Wodehouse, Anthony Powell, Philip Larkin and Evelyn Waugh. Amusingly it's titled "Eclectic", presumably because the editor decided that the American reader might have little idea or care who those people were. The final review here is actually of the final Harry Potter book, where Hitchens, whilst generally kind and acknowledging that these books get young people to read, still skewers Rowling:

"The repeated tactic of deus ex machina has a deplorable effect on both plot and dialogue".

Part 3 contains perhaps the most controversial (bizarrely) of all the writings "Why women aren't funny", written for an unimaginative, publicity seeking editor of Vanity Fair. Still managing to quote an interesting Kipling poem this disappointing rushed hack piece feels authored by a less talented Hitchens ghostwriter from GQ magazine. Definitely not disappointing in this section is Hitchens on Prince Charles:

"A hereditary head of state, as Thomas Paine so crisply phrased it, is as absurd a proposition as a hereditary physician. To this innate absurdity, Prince Charles manages to bring fatuities that are entirely his own".

Charles, Prince of Piffle. Slate, June 14, 2010.

Part 4 is Offshore Accounts. Disraeli said in Tancred "the East is a career" and Hitchens partly took this to heart, writing extensively on politics, Islamism and Orientalism in the Middle East. It is on religion that Hitchens has shown much of his intellectual rigor and bravery. The reader may find in his review of Orientalism and It's Discontents by Robert Irwin in The Atlantic, March 2007 a description of a certain key religious figure as "a sex-craved brigand whose preachments were either plagiarized or falsified".
This reader does not quite share the same fascination with this area of the world but one of the best essays in the book is here, a review of Edward Said's Orientalism, from the Atlantic, September 2003 - a book that was de rigor to be on your bookshelf when I was an MSc student in the late 1990s. Hitchens is quite fair to Said, although still slices him open with his accusation of membership of the "post-Foucault academy".

Part 5, Legacies of Totalitarianism, ups the intellectual and moral ante. It is worth remembering that Hitchens was once a committed socialist, as documented in his entertaining memoir Hitch 22. Heavy reviews here include Churchill, Hitler and Unnecessary War by Pat Buchanan - a book I have reviewed on Amazon - Human Smoke by Nicholson Baker, and Klemperer's I Will Bear Witness (Klemperer was a Jew married to an Aryan who survived the war. This is sobering stuff and a reminder of the madness that could be inflicted on the world again by extremism and total war. Hitchens' quote from Sebald on the aftermath of the fire bombings of Dresden by the 'good guys' says it all:

"In the altmarket in Dresden, where 6,865 corpses were burned on pyres in February 1945 by an SS detachment which had gained its experience in Treblinka". On the Natural History of Destruction by W.G. Sebald.
zzzachibis
People hailed Christopher Hitchens as the greatest polemicist of our time -- I don't think that quite captures the essence of his writing. To borrow a quote from Tommy Boy, the man could sell a ketchup popsicle to a woman in white gloves, yes. He had vast knowledge, yes. He could wow you with his vocabulary, yes. But, the truly astonishing thing in his writing was his masterful use of imagery. Read his essay (in this book) on why women aren't funny -- the subtle imagery, even the sounds of the words he chooses to convey his meanings are cloaked in eroticism; a man subtly (and sometimes not so subtly) physically admiring women, under the pretext of insulting them. What an incredible writer! Even if you don't agree with him -- *especially* if you don't agree with him -- you should at least respect the works of someone who uses the language so well on so many different levels.
Gavidor
Here is America's man of letters, wielding his peculiar brand of wisdom, wit, and acerbic humor at its best and at the highest levels available in his adopted homeland: Taking no prisoners, and leaving no trace of blood on the killing floors as he pulls the stiletto from his victims, one-by-one.

Not only does he define "what we are confronting" as a society, but he also sharpens the lens through which we see it. Clarity of thought and clarity of opinion through ruthlessly uncompromising honesty and English is what Hitch trades in. In short, the author digs deep, always coming up with the "goods:" a fresh but often missed interpretation that careens off of, and replaces the commonplace, settling it in a new home on a higher plane of logic and common sense, one that invariably rebuilds the context of historical facts setting them upright again.

A perfect case in point is the first essay on Thomas Jefferson (TJ a person Hitch could not admire more). Yet, he rushes right pass the nonsense about "whether or nor TJ screwed Sally Hemmings or not, to set the record straight with a dose of common sense that so nuanced that it shows that any other conclusions than that TJ was little more than a "dirty old confused, lonely, overly sexed man" would be just plain silly. In one bold stroke he remakes an American legend, stripping him of his fake knighthood and rebuilding him as just another ordinary, but full human being.

This is a veritable feast of Christopher Hitchens' essays.

At first I was inclined to skip about instead of reading the essays serially and straight through from the beginning of the book to end. However, after discovering newfound treasures in reading what I thought would be an obscure (easy to skip) essay on TJ and the "Barbary Wars." I changed my strategy and decided not to skip any of them. For it turns out rather surprisingly that TJ's excursion to Tripoli and this little war, also sharpened the contrasts and the contradictions of the meanings America had to put to itself.

The Barbary Wars were the second time (the U.S. Constitution being the first) that the U.S. would get to look itself in the mirror on the issue of slavery. White Americans had been captured at sea by Arab pirates (the terrorists of that day) and turned into slaves as well as hostages that were ransomed for a bounty in American dollars?

Here, Hitch turns this obscure incident into an object lesson in America's misfired democracy, as he points out unerringly, that again, for the second time, the founders, including TJ, pretended not to see the parallel or the irony between America's stealing of black men from the coast of Africa, and Arabs stealing white men from ships on the sea? At the same time that TJ sent American sailors to war in order to rescue white men from Arab slavery, America was engaged in the wholesale Atlantic slave trade?

Where else but in Hitch's careful reading of American history would we find object lessons in Americanism at every turn of the page -- essays that go to the core of the meaning of America and to its consciousness as well? Enough said. Five stars