carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » What I Talk About When I Talk About Running

eBook What I Talk About When I Talk About Running download

by Haruki Murakami

eBook What I Talk About When I Talk About Running download ISBN: 1607516349
Author: Haruki Murakami
Publisher: knopf (2008)
Pages: 180
ePub: 1835 kb
Fb2: 1142 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mobi mbr azw doc
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Essays and Correspondence

Home Haruki Murakami What I Talk About When I Talk About Running

Home Haruki Murakami What I Talk About When I Talk About Running. It’s been some ten years since I first had the idea of a book about running, but the years went by with me trying out one approach after another, never actually settling down to write it. Running is sort of a vague theme to begin with, and I found it hard to figure out exactly what I should say about it. At a certain point, though, I decided that I should just write honestly about what I think and feel about running, and stick to my own style. I figured that was the only way to get going, and I started writing the book, bit by bit, in the summer of 2005, finishing it in the fall of 2006.

narrated by Haruki Murakami. Listening to Murakami speak about the very universal way our inner voice functions with random thoughts - like clouds in the sky that come and go - was a little taste of heaven for me. Given that I, too, was a runner for 25 years of my life - running marathons - and hilly trail half marathons - often beginning my training runs in the dark with a flashlight - this was absolutely a lovely delightful Audiobook. I enjoyed it very much. A collection of personal essays about writing, endurance, and running, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running considers the impact running has had on the author’s life and work.

Joel Rice, The Tennessean" a graceful . I’ve never read a Murakami novel before so I had no idea what to expect from his running memoir.

Joel Rice, The Tennessean" a graceful explanation of Mr. Murakami's intertwining obsessions, conveyed with his characteristic ability to draw unexpected connections. I’d seen it on the bookshelf of a number of runners so as I started training for my first marathon a few weeks ago, I picked up the book as well.

What I Talk About When I Talk About Running is a memoir by Haruki Murakami in which he writes about his interest and participation in long-distance running. The book is translated by Philip Gabriel. Murakami started running in the early 1980s and since then has competed in over twenty marathons and an ultramarathon. The book's title was inspired by Raymond Carver's collection of short stories entitled What We Talk About When We Talk About Love. Interview with Murakami from Runner's World.

As I run I tell myself to think of a river. But essentially I’m not thinking of a thing. Sometimes when I think of life, I feel like a piece of driftwood washed up on shore. All I do is keep on running in my own cozy, homemade void, my own nostalgic silence. And this is a pretty wonderful thing. No matter what anybody else says.

What makes a runner - who hits the pavement day after day, mile after mile - keep going? There is a myth that Tibetan monks run 300 miles in 30 hours by fixating on a distant object and repeating a mantra with each footfall. Last year's New York City Marathon winner, Paula Radcliffe, says that she makes it through a tough race by counting her steps.

What a delightful read! I love his fiction, having read "The Wind Up Bird Chronicle" back in the '90's when it was first published, followed by a couple of his other books. I have been meaning to catc. h back up with him and read his more recent books that I've seen and heard about many friends reading, but I hadn't gotten there. Luckily, this was a weekend. I didn't know Murakami was a runner! A triathlete!

Alastair Campbell takes a fellow novelist's views on life and running in his stride.

Whatever respect I had for Haruki Murakami as a writer - which is considerable - it is as nothing to the depth of my bow down before the Japanese novelist on discovering that he has run an ultramarathon

Murakami began running seriously when he was 33, in 1982.

Murakami began running seriously when he was 33, in 1982. In recent years he has covered an average of six miles a day, six days a week and has competed in more than 20 marathons. In 1996 he completed an ultramarathon of 62 miles. Sometimes this interest is entirely that of a spectator (Oates), sometimes it is that of a keen if limited practitioner (Updike); always it engenders quasi-philosophical musings.

Haruki Murakami (村上 春樹, Murakami Haruki?, born January 12, 1949) is a Japanese writer and . Haruki Murakami at the Internet Book List. What I Talk About When I Talk About Running.

Haruki Murakami (村上 春樹, Murakami Haruki?, born January 12, 1949) is a Japanese writer and translator. His works of fiction and non-fiction have garnered him critical acclaim and numerous awards, including the Franz Kafka Prize and Jerusalem Prize among others. He is considered an important figure in postmodern literature. The reception of Murakami Haruki in Taiwan", Yale University. In 1982, having sold his jazz bar to devote himself to writing, Murakami began running to keep fit.

Comments: (7)
Perongafa
I’ve never read a Murakami novel before so I had no idea what to expect from his running memoir. I’d seen it on the bookshelf of a number of runners so as I started training for my first marathon a few weeks ago, I picked up the book as well.

I loved most of it. I found his philosophy with both running and writing to be similar to mine. There are many things that someone who’s not an endurance athlete can’t understand so maybe this book speaks to a narrow audience. But I’m glad to be a member of that audience. I found myself nodding along. I’d read a free sample on my Kindle, then found a used paperback to buy so I could underline passages and make notes in the margin. I loved this book so much I penciled it up.

Now that I’ve seen this glimpse into his mind I want to try his novels, too.

I would not say this is “equal parts training log, travelogue, and reminiscence,” as the book description does. It includes all those things, but not in equal parts. It’s a series of essays that he wrote, mostly during his training for the 2005 New York City Marathon, but the memories take him to other races and other periods of his life, and on a whirlwind tour of his stomping grounds across Hawaii, Boston, Greece, and Japan.
Alsantrius
I have this theory that goes like this: sometimes we find books, and sometimes books find us.

Oftentimes I'll pick up a book, read a few lines, and quickly close the covers. I'll instinctively know that no matter how much I want to read it that that book's message was meant for a later time. And sure enough, years later, I'll spot the book on the corner of my shelf and be moved to pick it up, only to find exactly what I needed to hear. It's funny how life, and reading, works that way.

Other times I'll find a book in the most random way - through a footnote or a random citation in an obscure periodical, for instance - and that book's message will be exactly what I needed to hear at that moment in my life. That was certainly the case with Japanese novelist Karuki Murakami's wonderful little book, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running.

While training for the New York City Marathon Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami decided to write about it as well. What materialized was a unique memoir that discusses his twin passions of writing and running, and the interesting way they nurture and inform each other.

I've been struggling as of late staying focused on the hard work of writing, so when I opened the book and read the following lines I knew that a message that I needed to hear had found me:

"One runner told of a mantra his older brother, also a runner, had taught him which he's pondered ever since he began running. Here it is: Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional. Say you're running and you start to think, Man this hurts, I can't take it anymore. The hurt part is an unavoidable reality, but whether or not you can stand any more is up to the runner himself. This pretty much sums up the most important aspect of marathon running."

If you feel called to creative work, and are struggling with finding the discipline necessary to create a body of work, you'll find this playful, oftentimes philosophical memoir food for your soul.
Anyshoun
I really liked this book. It didn't blow me out of the water with inspiration like I kind of expected, but that's ok. It's a memoir, not a manifesto. As a runner and writer myself, it was nice to see how the two mesh together for the author. I am anxious to read one of his novels now after getting a glimpse of his writing style.
Aside from the joy of gaining insight from his decades of experience, I found the author to be respectable, humble, and generally just a likable guy. Id' love to have coffee with him pick his brain some more. I found his humility and honesty refreshing and rare in a field where I am accustomed to sensationalized, horn-tooting tales of superatletes. I liked that he opened up about limits that come with aging, (though he's still faster than I may ever be) and how the love of running can wax and wann over time. Humility is an aspect often left out when people talk about running, but I find that at times I leave for a run expecting to feel a great sense of accomplishment, and return humbled instead, and those runs are every bit as important. I am grateful that he touched on those feelings.
Running is such a metaphor for life, it only makes sense that a writer may be an avid runner. I often write in my head while I run, and I enjoyed this account of someone who has been doing both for decades.