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by Felice Picano

eBook A House on the Ocean, a House on the Bay: A Memoir download ISBN: 0571199135
Author: Felice Picano
Publisher: Faber & Faber; First Edition (Unsta edition (March 1, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 270
ePub: 1186 kb
Fb2: 1826 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mobi lrf txt rtf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Essays and Correspondence

Picano also reflects on his position as a survivor-the remaining 2% left after the AIDS crisis devestates the Gay 2000, and his role now as a witness. Also apparent is Picano's fine education, cultural appreciation, love of writing, determined confidence, and perceptive mind.

Picano also reflects on his position as a survivor-the remaining 2% left after the AIDS crisis devestates the Gay 2000, and his role now as a witness. This is the book that sent me into a summer of reading whatever Picano books I could find. It's hard to imagine anyone-gay or straight-not getting something out of this memoir. Truly a voice of his generation, and for future ones as well Yeah, I liked the book. 8 people found this helpful.

Being the rabid Picano fan that I am, it's not always easy to consider myself unbiased. However, since I thoroughly disliked his Like People in History, I feel I can be more objective now. That said, A House on the Ocean, a House on the Bay: A Memoir is amazing. It is a thoroughly engaging book that takes us on an interesting journey of one man's life that is terribly full and robust. However, like many a Southern author (which Mr. Picano is NOT), Picano manages to make this book feel like a leisurely wander, allowing us to discover the nuances he wants us to realize at his pace and.

by. Picano, Felice, 1944-.

Picano also regales us with stories about the legendary "Class of 1975, " the "Gay 2,000" - hip, political, talented, beautiful . Like Edmund White's "City Boy", Picano's memoir addresses gay life in the 1970s/80s in New York City.

Picano also regales us with stories about the legendary "Class of 1975, " the "Gay 2,000" - hip, political, talented, beautiful young men who formed and molded gay culture as it exists today. AIDS eventually spread through the Pines like wildfire and about 98 percent of the "Gay 2,000" are now dead, but Felice Picano has lived through it all, and he gives voice to those times with humor, candor, and wistfulness.

The best of Picano's memoirs to date. Absolutely compelling. com User, September 24, 1998. Frankly, when I got to the final 100 pages, on Gay Pride Night, no less, I was so compelled to finish the book that I stayed up all night to finish it and then pack for a business trip to London. Once again, it is split in parts.

A House on the Ocean, a House on the Bay: A Memoir, Faber and Faber (Boston, MA), 1997. Immortal (play with music; based on Picano's novella An Asian Minor: The True Story of Ganymede), produced Off-Off Broadway, 1986. The Bombay Trunk, produced in San Francisco, 2002. Fred in Love, University of Wisconsin Press (Madison, WI), 2005. Art and Sex in Greenwich Village: Gay Literary Life after Stonewall, Perseus Publishing, 2007. Ingoldsby, produced in Ann Arbor, Michigan, 2007. Eyes, based on the novel of the same title (1986). Universal Donor (2003). Very Large Array (2007).

Picano notes the sales figures of his novels Smart as the Devil (1975) and Eyes (1976) and, as if he's desperate not to be thought a hack, explains how complex and rewarding these books are. Without redeeming irony, he goes on at length about how supremely attractive and desirable he an. . Without redeeming irony, he goes on at length about how supremely attractive and desirable he and his two closest friends were considered by the Fire Island smart set. Perhaps most off-putting is Picano's evident conviction that the endless drugged-up days of sex and dancing and more sex during the late '70s added up to some kind of golden age of gay culture.

A House on the Ocean, A House on the Bay spans the heyday of Picano's life in the Pines and Manhattan during the 1960s and 1970s. He chronicles his love affairs and the tortuous intricacies of a longtime love triangle, his hilarious misadventures as a bookstore employee (arranging a book party hosted by Jackie Onassis, lunchtime rendezvous in secret tunnels below Grand Central Station, getting framed for embezzlement!), and the thrills and agonies involved in the writing and publishing of his first novels, including Smart as the. Devil and Eyes. Used availability for Felice Picano's A House On the Ocean, a House On the Bay.

Published March 1998 by Faber & Faber. Felice Picano (1944-).

A House on the Ocean, a House on the Bay. Dryland’s End. Like People in History. Only five or six passengers had come across the bay with her, sparsely settling the big upstairs deck, making it seem even emptier. On the Sea Mist side, no one was waiting-no greeting families, no welcoming husbands, wives, lovers, boyfriends. Only a large sheepdog with a bandanna tied around its shaggy neck was sitting on its haunches, as though expecting its master. It stood up to sniff the legs of the departing passengers, then settled back to continue waiting. Despite the few people, it was still pleasant being here, Stevie said to herself, determined to go through with what she’d begun.

A House on the Ocean, A House on the Bay spans the heyday of Picano's life in the Pines and Manhattan during the 1960s and 1970s. He chronicles his love affairs and the tortuous intricacies of a longtime love triangle, his hilarious misadventures as a bookstore employee (arranging a book party hosted by Jackie Onassis, lunchtime rendezvous in secret tunnels below Grand Central Station, getting framed for embezzlement!), and the thrills and agonies involved in the writing and publishing of his first novels, including Smart as the Devil and Eyes.Picano also regales us with stories about the legendary "Class of 1975," the "Gay 2,000" - hip, political, talented, beautiful young men who formed and molded gay culture as it exists today. AIDS eventually spread through the Pines like wildfire and about 98 percent of the "Gay 2,000" are now dead, but Felice Picano has lived through it all, and he gives voice to those times with humor, candor, and wistfulness.
Comments: (6)
Burgas
Being the rabid Picano fan that I am, it's not always easy to consider myself unbiased. However, since I thoroughly disliked his Like People in History, I feel I can be more objective now.

That said, A House on the Ocean, a House on the Bay: A Memoir is amazing. It is a thoroughly engaging book that takes us on an interesting journey of one man's life that is terribly full and robust. However, like many a Southern author (which Mr. Picano is NOT), Picano manages to make this book feel like a leisurely wander, allowing us to discover the nuances he wants us to realize at his pace and not at the pace of our reading.

It's a trick not easily done.

This is a fine book about Picano's time spent on Fire Island and the people he knew and loved during that time.

I highly recommend this book.
Runeterror
I am Felice Picano, or certainly am living his life. Well, sort of. When I read straight through this book--a library copy, I am going to buy it now--I said to myself and to my friends that I loved the book so much because of how much I see of him in me, including that he was also born on February 22nd, that we are both gay, and that I am struggling, as he was, to write. If any book can give me inspiration to live my dream, it is "A House on the Ocean, A House on the Bay." Bravo to Picano for writing a book that was written for me.
Ballalune
I enjoyed this book greatly. I grew up in this time completely unaware of the world out there for me.
Binthars
Frankly, when I got to the final 100 pages, on Gay Pride Night, no less, I was so compelled to finish the book that I stayed up all night to finish it and then pack for a business trip to London.
Picking up his life in the mid-1970s, Picano gives an account of post-liberation, book store jobs, love affairs, friendships, and the wisdom of time and difference.
Once again, it is split in parts. The first details a tortured menage a trois in which Felice is the one wanted "for his mind." He works as a book store manager and plans a career as a writer.
In the second part, he discusses the Fire Island scene, the "Gay 2000" who influenced gay culture and the broader culture at large, and his job at a fancier bookstore--unnamed by recognizable as Rizzoli.
Picano, more here than elsewhere, comes into contact with more recognizable celebrities--wide-ranging from Rose Kennedy to Bette Midler (in her bathhouse singer days).
Picano also reflects on his position as a survivor--the remaining 2% left after the AIDS crisis devestates the Gay 2000, and his role now as a witness.
Also apparent is Picano's fine education, cultural appreciation, love of writing, determined confidence, and perceptive mind. This is the book that sent me into a summer of reading whatever Picano books I could find. It's hard to imagine anyone--gay or straight--not getting something out of this memoir. Truly a voice of his generation, and for future ones as well
Yeah, I liked the book. :-))
Winotterin
If you're a fan of Picano's memoirs, then you'll read this because there's no way to stop reading once you've gotten hooked. This volume is a particular favorite of mine - it's nice to watch the author come into his own and there is a beauty and delicacy in the way he recalls years when he was making dear friends and discovering himself as an artist. And yes, these were the years before AIDS wrecked so much of what he (and so many of us) cherished. Picano's memoirs are not to be missed, and this volume is central to their conception. Beautiful writing - Picano at his best.
Zulkishicage
Although I have read most all of Felice Picano's books, I find myself returning to A HOUSE ON THE OCEAN, A HOUSE ON THE BAY most frequently - sometimes just for recalling his atmospheric descriptions of places with and without people, sometimes just to re-visit Fire Island - a place I've never been but that has become for me a solid symbol of East Coast escape. Picano's memoirs at times are overwhelming: how could one man have experienced life so richly and tranposed it to words for us, the voyeur readers? Perhaps the places and people he so succinctly describes are bathed in poetic license, but that only makes the moments in between interpersonal encounters pregnant pauses. Picano has managed to keep us entertained book after book and I eagerly await the release of ONYX.