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by Jean Baptiste Racine,John Cairncross,E. F. Watling

eBook Iphigenia, Phaedra and Athaliah (Penguin Classics) download ISBN: 0140441220
Author: Jean Baptiste Racine,John Cairncross,E. F. Watling
Publisher: Penguin Classics; Reprint edition (February 28, 1964)
Language: English
Pages: 320
ePub: 1488 kb
Fb2: 1923 kb
Rating: 4.7
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Category: Literature
Subcategory: Dramas and Plays

Iphigenia, Phaedra, Athaliah. Imprint: Penguin Classics. Iphigenia, Phaedra, Athaliah.

Iphigenia, Phaedra, Athaliah. Published: 02/12/2004. John Cairncross (Translator). Strongly influenced by Classical drama, Jean Racine (1639-99) broke away from the grandiose theatricality of baroque drama to create works of intense psychological realism, with characters manipulated by cruel and vengeful gods. Iphigenia depicts a princess's absolute submission to her father's will, despite his determination to sacrifice her to gain divine favour before going to war.

Iphigenia · Phaedra Athaliah. Translated and Introduced by. JOHN CAIRNCROSS. THE present reprint of Iphigenia, Phaedra and Athaliah offers a suitable opportunity to take stock of the essential problems inherent in the translation of Racine. The various modern versions of Phaedra and other Racinian plays and the critics’ reactions to my own version have confirmed me in my belief that Racine should be rendered as literally as possible, that the rendering should be in unrhymed verses of five syllables (. blank verse) and that the major aim within these limitations should be to try to reproduce in.

Britannicus, Phaedra, Athaliah (Oxford World's Classics). Jean Racine was born in 1639 at La Ferté Milon, sixty miles east of Paris. John Cairncross also translated The Cid; Cinna ; The Theatrical Illusion (0140443126) for Penguin Classics. Customers who bought this item also bought. Page 1 of 1 Start overPage 1 of 1.

Iphigenia, Phaedra and Athaliah. by Jean Racine and John Cairncross.

Destination, rates & speeds. 7. Iphigenia, Phaedra and Athaliah (Penguin Classics)

Destination, rates & speeds. Iphigenia, Phaedra and Athaliah (Penguin Classics). Racine, Jean Baptiste; Cairncross, John; Watling, E. F. Published by Penguin Classics. ISBN 10: 0140441220 ISBN 13: 9780140441222.

Iphigenia; Phaedra; Athaliah (Penguin Classics). Iphigenia and Phaedra are based on Euripides' plays Iphigenia at Aulis and Hippolytus

Iphigenia; Phaedra; Athaliah (Penguin Classics). 0140441220 (ISBN13: 9780140441222). Iphigenia and Phaedra are based on Euripides' plays Iphigenia at Aulis and Hippolytus. Jean-Baptiste Racine was a French dramatist, one of the "big three" of 17th century France (along with Molière and Corneille), and one of the most important literary figures in the Western tradition. Racine's dramaturgy is marked by his psychological insight, the prevailing passion of his characters, and the nakedness of both plot and stage. Although primarily a tragedian, Racine wrote one comedy.

Iphigenia; Phaedra; Athaliah (Racine, Penguin Classics, 1963). Andromache; Britannicus; Berenice (Racine, Penguin Classics, 1967). The Cid, Cinna, The Theatrical Illusion (Corneille, Penguin Classics, 1975). Polyeuctus, The Liar, The Nicomedes (Corneille, Penguin Classics, 1980). La Fontaine Fables and Other Poems (La Fontaine, Colin Smythe, 1982).

Iphigenia, Phaedra, Athaliah (Paperback). Jean Racine (author), John Cairncross (translator) Added to basket. Jean Racine (author), John Cairncross (translator). 1. 9 Added to basket.

By Jean Racine Introduction by John Cairncross Translated by John . About Iphigenia, Phaedra and Athaliah. Three plays by Racine.

By Jean Racine Introduction by John Cairncross Translated by John Cairncross. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Strongly influenced by Classical drama, Jean Racine (1639-99) broke .

Strongly influenced by Classical drama, Jean Racine (1639-99) broke away from the grandiose theatricality of baroque drama to create works of intense psychological realism, with characters manipulated by cruel and vengeful gods. And Athaliah portrays a ruthless pagan queen, who defies Jehovah in her desperate attempt to keep the throne of Jerusalem from its legitimate heir.

Three plays by RacineFor more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
Comments: (4)
Granirad
Agony-themed stage plays reached their zenith with the masterful pen of French playwright, Jean Racine. Passion, wickedness, deceit, and conspiracy flowed like honey into the tragedies: "Phèdre" (1677), "Iphigénie en Aulide" (1674), and Athalie (1691). We understand the power of tragedy when it is handled with a sure hand. When the unities are present, the crescendo reigns supreme beyond any mere contrivances of plot, theme, and character development; then you have masterpieces, like these three dramatic works of art.

Phèdre falls in love with her husband Thésée's son Hippolyte - and through her passion she dooms the young man, the woman (Princess Aricie), her husband, her nurse confidante (who drives the plot with her unwise, dishonorable advice to Phèdre), and ultimately herself (she takes poison after confessing her crime to Thésée).

Athalie (who worships Baal) murders her own grandchildren after becoming a Queen through her own usurption of the throne. Evil passion plays herself well at this point for Athalie now seeks to kill the child King of Judah, Joas. Joad, the high priest, intercedes and has Athalie killed at the hands of the Levites.

In French

Les jeux agonie-à thème d'étape ont atteint leur zénith avec le stylo habile de dramaturge français, Jean Racine. La passion, la cruauté, le mensonge, et la conspiration a coulé comme le miel dans les tragédies : « Phèdre » (1677), « Iphigénie en Aulide » (1674), et « Athalie » (1691). Nous comprenons le pouvoir de tragédie quand il est contrôlé avec une main sûre. Quand les unités sont présentes, le crescendo règne suprême au-delà des simples dispositifs de complot, au-delà du thème, et au-delà du développement de caractère ; alors vous avez des chefs-d'oeuvre, comme ces trois oeuvres d'art dramatiques.

Phèdre tombe dans l'amour avec son Hippolyte de fils de Thésée de mari - et par sa passion elle condamne le jeune homme, la femme (Aricie de Princesse), son mari, son OEnone d'infirmière (qui conduit le complot avec son mauvais conseil à Phèdre), et finalement se (elle prend du poison après avoir avoué son crime à Thésée).

Athalie (qui adore Baal) assassine ses propres petits-enfants après avoir devenu Reine par sa propre usurpation du trône. La passion diabolique se joue bien à ce point pour Athalie cherche maintenant à tuer le Roi enfant de Judah, Joas. Joad, l'haut prêtre, intercède et a Athalie a tué aux mains du Levites.
Alsardin
This volume contains three of Racine's classical drama. Two 'Iphigenia' and 'Phaedra' are based on plays of Euripides. The third is based on a Biblical story.

'Iphigenia' relates to the conflict Agammemnon has over whether or not to meet the demands of the gods and sacrifice his daughter Iphigenia, or by not doing so to prevent the Greek expedition from proceeding on its way to war with Troy. The outcome is an unusual one for Racine in that Iphigenia is spared, and the expedition nonetheless goes ahead.

'Phaedra' is Racine's best known play. It is based on an earlier version of the play by Euripides. It is written at a relatively late period in Racine's career when he was moving back toward Jansensim and a fully religious life. The play is considered the most perfect French example of a tragedy written according to the classic rules. The story is one of illicit passion and its price. One strange idea of Racine was that the 'gods' forced people to sin, and then punished them for this. This cruelty of the gods somehow suits the whole tenor of Racine's work which has a certain fierce kind of cruelty in it. Phaedra the second wife of the king Theseus falls passionately in love with Theseus' son Hippolytus. Hippolytus who supposedly hates woman is in fact secretly in love with Arcis. Upon receiving a message that Theseus has died Phaedra contain contain her passion and confesses her love to a horrified Hippolytus. Then it is revealed that the message of Theseus dead like Mark Twain's has been premature. Theseus returns and urged on by her wicked servant Oenone Phaedra indicates that Hippolytus has attempted to seduce her. Outraged Theseus orders that his son be executed. Phaedra upon learning this thinks to confess, but then learns that Hippolytus is not indifferent women as he has pretended to her but in fact loves Arcis. In a fit of jealousy she allows Theseus to carry out the execution. Upon learning of Hippolytus death, she commits suicide.

The virtous Phaedra who worked so hard to overcome her passion for Hippolytus has been defeated by that passion. The passion, the sinful nature of the human heart has ruthlessly brought to the tragic death of the innocence. This is the harsh and bleak world of Racine's tragedy, the cruel world in which sinner and innocent alike go to their doom.

In 'Athaliah' Racine's Jansenist religious sympathies come to the fore, though in contradiction with loyalty to the monarchy and Louis XIV who despised Jansenism. Athaliah is a ruling queen who despite her sympathetic character is eventually defeated by a cruel and inevitable fate.

As John Cairncross puts it in his excellent introduction to this play ..." Racine set out ostensibly to defend absolute monarchy by divine right and ended up by appeals to pity the poor that smack of eighteenth- century humanitarianism. ..There can be few more striking examples of an artist going beyond and indeed against the aims that he might be expected to follow. ..Racine was too rich and complex, too sensitive to the endless contradictions of life, not to reproduce these in his last play. It is a fitting conclusion to a series of works of genius that hold perpetual revelations to the attentive reader." pp.232
Auau
According to my class' notes, Barthes said that there is a law about Racine's tragedies: A loves B. B does not love A. B is under A's control. This is a simplistic approach that sort of works, but "Phaedra" is far more complex than a simple letter soup. Hippolytus is not totally under Phaedra's control, since he decides not to tell Theseus what has really happened between himself and his stepmother. This makes him noble, but less than brilliant. Phaedra is guilty of a passion she cannot help, and turns her guilt into criminal acts by accusing Hippolytus of either lecherous intent or outright rape, depending on how one reads her words. Theseus is a cad who projects his own behaviour onto everybody else, so he immediately believes the worst about his son. And Oenone is a snake, the personification of bad counsel who does not even begin to pay, with her own suicide, for the tragedy she has helped unleash. Racine has created a masterpiece of brevity and passion, following the example of his much admired Euripides. It is clear after reading "Phaedra," that his work goes far beyond the simple A-B-C of Barthes, and into deep psychological development of characters who make fateful choices based on their passions. This is a great play by a great playwright.