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by Robert N. Watson,Ben Jonson

eBook Every Man in His Humour (New Mermaids) download ISBN: 0713643978
Author: Robert N. Watson,Ben Jonson
Publisher: Methuen Drama; New edition (July 31, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 160
ePub: 1549 kb
Fb2: 1738 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lit docx txt mobi
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Dramas and Plays

Every Man in His Humour is a 1598 play by the English playwright Ben Jonson. The play belongs to the subgenre of the "humours comedy," in which each major character is dominated by an over-riding humour or obsession.

Every Man in His Humour is a 1598 play by the English playwright Ben Jonson.

Every Man out of His Humour is a satirical comedy written by English playwright Ben Jonson, acted in 1599 by the Lord Chamberlain's Men. It is a conceptual sequel to his 1598 comedy Every Man in His Humour

Every Man out of His Humour is a satirical comedy written by English playwright Ben Jonson, acted in 1599 by the Lord Chamberlain's Men. It is a conceptual sequel to his 1598 comedy Every Man in His Humour. It was much less successful on stage than its predecessor, though it was published in quarto three times in 1600 alone; it was also performed at Court on 8 January 1605.

In plays like Every Man in His Humour (1598), Sejanus His Fall (1603) .

In plays like Every Man in His Humour (1598), Sejanus His Fall (1603), Eastward Ho! . Jonson took every opportunity to get one over on his Puritan persecutors (who would ultimately close the theaters during the years of Interregnum, from 1649 to 1660). But if Dr. Johnson was one of the first literary critics to distinguish between these two movements (ones that the poets themselves might not have recognized), then it wasn’t until . Eliot’s 1921 essay The Metaphysical Poets that the critical regard of the Tribe of Ben, and by proxy the man whom they drew inspiration from, would see.

Every Man in His Humour (New Mermaid Series).

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. ISBN-13: 978-1849020824. Every Man in His Humour (New Mermaid Series).

Every Man In His Humour. In the late sixteenth century, English playwright Ben Jonson revitalized an ancient style of comedic theater known as "comedy of humours. Drawing on the theory that each person has a particular trait - or "humour" - that defines their personality and perspective, Every Man in His Humour explores what happens when people with diametrically opposed humours are forced to interact with each other. Every Man Out Of His Humour: "In small proportions we just beauties see; And in short measures, life may perfect b. Ben Jonson.

Watson, Robert N. Distinguished Professor. Neikirk Distinguished Professor of English Kaplan 282 Tel: 31. 25. His ecocritical book Back to Nature: The Green and the Real in the Late Renaissance, won the 2007 Elizabeth Dietz Memorial Prize, awarded annually for the best book published in early modern studies, as well as the ASLE Prize for the best book of ecocriticism of 2005-07; and he has continued to work and publish on environmental and animal-protection issues.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Every Man in His Humour by Ben Jonson (Paperback . Robert N. Watson is Professor of English at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Robert N. He has served since 1997 as Head Scholar of the Teaching Shakespeare Summer Institute at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, . Country of Publication.

and dedicating his first dramatic success, "Every Man in His Humour," to him. It is doubtful whether Jonson ever went to either university, though Fuller says that he was "statutably admitted into St. John's College, Cambridge. He tells us that he took no degree, but was later "Master of Arts in both the universities, by their favour, not his study.

A wight that, hitherto, his every step hath left the stamp of a great foot behind him, as every word the savour of a. .

A wight that, hitherto, his every step hath left the stamp of a great foot behind him, as every word the savour of a strong spirit, and he! this man! so graced, gilded, or, to use a more fit metaphor, so tenfold by nature, as not ten housewives' pewter, again a good time, shews more bright to the world than he! and he! . Mine ance'try came from a king's belly, no worse man; and yet no man either, by your worship's leave, I did lie in that, but herring, the king of fish (from his belly I proceed), one of the monarchs of the world, I assure you. The first red herring that was broiled in Adam and Eve's kitchen, do I fetch my pedigree from, by the harrot's book.

Like all of Jonson's city comedies, this play - here given in the 1616 Folio version, in which Jonson rewrote and set it in England, not Italy - is a kind of dramatised Do-It-Yourself kit on how to bluff one's way in Elizabethan London. Although Roman New Comedy, in which a crafty slave helps a wild youngster to marry the girl of his choice against his father's wishes, supplies Jonson with his basic plot, the world that he presents here is thoroughly contemporary and mundane. The characters' 'humours' - their driving obsessions - may vary, but all of them strive to represent something greater, nobler, cleverer than their real selves. The joke of the play, this editor suggests, is 'finally on all of us who unconsciously equate the universe with a story in which we play the hero'.

Comments: (3)
Dianazius
A few months ago I had the good fortune to find a copy of a parallel text edition (Regents Renaissance Drama series by University of Nebraska Press) of the 1601 quarto and the 1616 folio of Every Man In His Humour. My enthusiasm may seem surprising, but I did enjoy this rather obscure work. This play, Ben Jonson's first theatrical success, was first performed in 1598 by the Lord Chamberlain's Men. Remarkably, the cast included Shakespeare, Burbage, and Kemp.

The term humour, derived from the Latin word for fluid, refers to a Medieval and Renaissance medical theory that a man's health and personality were due to the balance (or imbalance) of four fluids, or humours: blood, phlegm, yellow bile (choler), and black bile (melancholy). The Elizabethan audience would have recognized that Jonson's characters were caricatures of various temperaments and personalities.

Jonson later significantly revised this play. My edition compares the two versions on facing pages: the 1601 quarto with a Florentine setting and Italian names, and the 1616 folio with a London setting and English characters. I first tried reading the two versions in parallel, a page from one followed by the equivalent page from the other, but I was soon utterly confused. I began again, reading one version in its entirety before reading the other.

Every Man in His Humour is more challenging than Jonson's better known plays. I was into Act 2 before I began to appreciate the humorous interplay between the characters. The turning point occurred when the servant Musco (weirdly named Brainworm in the London version) disguised himself as a penniless soldier looking for charity. I gradually recognized four intertwined themes:

1) Two young, high-spirited gentlemen, Lorenzo Junior (Edward Kno'well) and Prospero (Wellbred), deliberately encourage the foolish antics of other characters, quietly laughing at them in frequent asides.

2) Meanwhile, Lorenzo Senior (Kno'well) worries that his son is mixing with less reputable acquaintances.

3) Musco (Brainworm) independently embarks on several zany ventures, all involving disguises, to assure that Lorenzo Junior (Edward Kno'well) is beholden to him.

4) And lastly, the merchant Thorello (Thomas Kitely) mistakenly convinces himself that his wife Biancha (Dame Kitely) and his sister Hesperida (Mistress Budget) are being wooed by the foolish mix of characters that descended upon his home. (Shakespeare may have derived the name Othello from Jonson's jealous Thorello.)

For the reader new to Ben Jonson, I suggest starting with either The Alchemist, or Volpone, or possibly Bartholomew Fair. All three plays are widely available from publishers like Oxford World Classics, the New Mermaids editions, or the Dover Thrift editions (least expensive, but sparse footnotes).
Coiril
Every Man in His Humor was one of Ben Jonson's earliest plays. Although it is a somewhat obscure work today, remarkably, when first performed in 1598 by the Lord Chamberlain's Men, the cast included Shakespeare, Burbage, and Kemp.

The term humor, derived from Latin word for fluid, refers to a Medieval and Renaissance medical theory that a man's health and personality were due to the balance (or imbalance) of four fluids, or humors: blood, phlegm, yellow bile (choler), and black bile (melancholy). The Elizabethan audience would have recognized that Jonson's characters were caricatures of various temperaments and personalities.

Jonson later significantly revised this play. The original 1601 quarto had a Florentine setting and Italian names. His revision, the 1616 folio version, substitutes a London setting with English characters. In my discussion below, I have noted the 1616 English characters using parenthesis.

Every Man in His Humour was more challenging than I expected. I was into Act 2 before I began to appreciate the interplay between the characters. For me the turning point occurred when the servant Mosca (weirdly named Brainworm in the London version) disguised himself as a penniless soldier looking for charity. I gradually recognized four intertwined themes:

1) Two young, high-spirited gentlemen, Lorenzo Junior (Edward Kno'well) and Prospero (Wellbred), deliberately encourage the foolish antics of other characters, quietly laughing at them in frequent asides.

2) Meanwhile, Lorenzo Senior (Kno'well) worries that his son is mixing with less reputable acquaintances.

3) Mosca (Brainworm) independently embarks on several zany ventures, all involving disguises, to assure that Lorenzo Junior (Edward Kno'well) is beholden to him.

4) And lastly, the merchant Thorello (Thomas Kitely) mistakenly convinces himself that his wife Biancha (Dame Kitely) and his sister Hesperida (Mistress Budget) are being wooed by the foolish mix of characters that has descended upon his home. (Shakespeare may have derived the name Othello from Jonson's jealous Thorello.)

I had difficulty keeping track of the numerous characters that wandered on and off the stage, reminding me of my first reading of Bartholomew Fair, a Jonson play with an even larger cast. The dialogue ranges from scholarly quotes in Latin to lower class slang. I found the footnotes to be helpful.

Both the original 1601 play and Jonson's revised 1616 version make good reading. I had the good fortune to find a copy of a parallel text edition (Regents Renaissance Drama series by University of Nebraska Press) of the 1601 quarto and the 1616 folio of Every Man In His Humour.

One last comment: Is it Humor or Humour? It makes a difference when conducting a title search.
Tansino
I found this to be a great and easily portable edition of the 1616 folio edition of Every Man in His Humour. It could use more information on Jonson's definition of humours and its impact on early Stuart comedy of humours!