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eBook The Widow's Tale download

by Mick Jackson

eBook The Widow's Tale download ISBN: 0571254411
Author: Mick Jackson
Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (February 1, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1683 kb
Fb2: 1159 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: docx lit mbr rtf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Deliver toandnbsp;France

When I ran out of the house I don’t think I had any real idea where I was going. I suppose by then I’d decided to see about some accommodation

When I ran out of the house I don’t think I had any real idea where I was going. I suppose by then I’d decided to see about some accommodation. My original plan was to book myself into the hotel, for nostalgia’s sake – just for a night or two. But as I was wandering up and down I saw the little letting agents. And I thought, why the hell not?

A newly-widowed woman has done a runner. Mick Jackson is the prize winning author of two novels, The Underground Man and Five Boys, described in the Sunday Times as 'vibrant, happily eccentric and a joy to read'.

A newly-widowed woman has done a runner. She just jumped in her car, abandoned her (very nice) house in north London and kept on driving until she reached the Norfolk coast. Now she's rented a tiny cottage and holed herself away there, if only to escape the ceaseless sympathy and insincere concern. She's not quite sure, but thinks she may be having a bit of a breakdown. He also published, with the illustrator David Roberts, two acclaimed curiosities, Ten Sorry Tales and Bears of England.

The Widow's Tale book. A newly-widowed woman has done a runner  . By turns elegiac and highly comical, The Widow's Tale conjures up this most defiantly unapologetic of narrators as she begins to pick over the wreckage of her life and decide what has real value and what she should leave behind.

As if there’s been some administrative oversight or clerical error which has somehow kept us apart. Quite often, when the phone goes my first thought is, ‘That’ll be hi. hen he was going to call. Or I’ll just be pottering around the house and become aware that there’s someone I really must get in touch with. And for that first fraction of a second I’ll not know who it is I’m thinking of. Then, Oh yes. That man. That husband. The one I lived with for forty years

The Widow's Tale Paperback – 17 Mar 2011.

The Widow's Tale Paperback – 17 Mar 2011. by Mick Jackson (Author).

In his third novel, Mick Jackson maps the same territory in fictional form. Like Didion's book, it is tightly packed with explosive emotion and is perhaps best kept away from those likely to recognise their immediate circumstances in it: better to put it into the hands of well-wishers who are trying to support or understand or bear with those who are harrowed by grief

By Mick Jackson (Faber £1. 9). You could never accuse Mick Jackson of writing books that are all the same.

By Mick Jackson (Faber £1. By Amber Pearson for MailOnline Updated: 18:21 GMT, 7 April 2010. Last year’s The Bears of England was an off-beat collection of short stories, while his 1997 novel The Underground Man - shortlisted for the Booker Prize - drew on the life of the eccentric fifth Duke of Portland who constructed an elaborate network of tunnels beneath his estate. The heroine of Mick Jackson's latest novel is a widow on the run.

Mick Jackson's third novel is more amusing than it has any right to be. His narrator – a well-off woman in her sixties – has lasted two months in London . It helps that the book is as funny as it is moving, as if grief has given her the licence to pronounce with caustic hauteur on the world. His narrator – a well-off woman in her sixties – has lasted two months in London since the death of her husband. There is a particularly good running gag on the birdwatchers she encounters on the marshes ("ornithological paparazzi"). Armed with a pair of binoculars, she tries to fit in.

A newly-widowed woman has done a runner. She just jumped in her car, abandoned her (very nice) house in north London and kept on driving until she reached the Norfolk coast. Now she's rented a tiny cottage and holed herself away there, if only to escape the ceaseless sympathy and insincere concern. She's not quite sure, but thinks she may be having a bit of a breakdown. Or perhaps this sense of dislocation is perfectly normal in the circumstances. All she knows is that she can't sleep and may be drinking a little more than she ought to. But as her story unfolds we discover that her marriage was far from perfect. That it was, in fact, full of frustration and disappointment, as well as one or two significant secrets, and that by running away to this particular village she might actually be making her own personal pilgrimage.

By turns elegiac and highly comical, The Widow's Tale conjures up this most defiantly unapologetic of narrators as she begins to pick over the wreckage of her life and decide what has real value and what she should leave behind.

Comments: (6)
Malalrajas
Wonderful book! Probably "boring" for young people with minimal life experience and a lack of belief that they will (if they are lucky) ever be anything other than young. That's what I saw in the one star reviews, at least.
Braendo
So bad! I very rarely give up on a book, but I must admit giving this one the big heave ho about half way through. Just wasn't going anywhere and I lost interest in the main character and couldn't have cared less how she ended up!
caif
This is nothing like Mick Jackson's other works. It has some humor in it, but I didn't find it appealing.
Melipra
This book just does not do it for me. I found it so so boring. Nothing seems to happen.....unhappy widow runs away, wanders up and down the beach, stalks someone for a bit,talks to herself a lot, reviews her not very exciting life, and goes home. Well written, maybe I just do not 'get it'?
Skilkancar
This is an extremely easy to read book, which is also beautiful and very rewarding. Don't expect nail-biting tension or rollercoaster plotting. Its an ostensibly simple story of a perfectly ordinary life, and as the book progresses the narrator becomes more and more real, and more and more engaging through her very ordinariness and the ordinariness of the events of her life.

The title of the book says it all, as does the description of the plot in the publicity blurb. A woman loses her husband, and this book recounts probably 2 or 3 weeks where she is going through the processes such an event throws up. That's really all there is to the book.

The revelation and enjoyment are in the feisty, terrified, too heavy-drinking, devastated, funny (about herself as much as anything else) vulnerable, pig-headed, nature and expressiveness of 'the Widow' whose tale this is.

The male author has absolutely succeeded in inhabiting a female sensibility. I had moments of laugh out loud in public reading this, at some of the witty turns of phrase and way of seeing the world and herself which 'the Widow' came up with - and then, almost immediately would have to wipe away tears as the rawness of desolation, despair, need and pain were revealed.

An excellent book, truthful and immediate.

I received it originally as an ARC from Amazon Vine UK
anneli
Not as morose as the title and cover might suggest, The Widow's Tale is actually a sprightly and often humorous account of dealing with loss, attempting to deal with the absurdity of the situation it leaves one in and the strange affect it has on how other people relate to the whole bereavement process. That's not to say that the novel is neglectful of the wave of deep feelings, the emotions, the sense of loss and complete dismantling of one's life that occurs, but at the same time it's understood that there's a necessity to deal with them and it's precisely the good old fashioned just-get-on-with-it manner with the widow in question here that drives and sets the tone of The Widow's Tale - even if in her case that means running away from it all after the unexpected death of her husband and sitting it out in a small rented cottage in a remote Norfolk village.

Noting her impressions down in the form of a journal, the observations here are wonderful - lightly and sometimes blackly humorous, the writing clear, precise and entertaining. Initially there doesn't appear to be much here in terms of novelistic depth, rigour or structuring, the first-person brief journal-entry point of view sections with their anecdotal impressions coming across a little like the observations of a regular columnist in a Sunday newspaper magazine Lifestyle supplement. The observations are keen however, seeing society and human relations from the fresh perspective of one whose world has been turned upside down, taking in other little quirky observations about human nature and getting old along the way, the whole absurdity of it all suddenly revealed.

As far as that goes, this is wonderfully enjoyable and entertaining writing, even if it is mostly somewhat episodic and anecdotal. Eventually however, through recollection of some other events in her life that have been revived by the loss of her husband, through her little quirks and obsessions, a more sympathetic and human side of our narrator arises out of her little journal notes and the seriousness of her condition becomes clear. The writing and the situations are related with an undeniable note of truth that it gets right to the heart of the character, of what bereavement means and how it is viewed in our society, allowing the reader to understand and sympathise with her - and undoubtedly many like her - in her predicament.

It's a slim account, deceptively light and readable and certainly possible to read it in one sitting, although to do so seems wasteful when you can have the delight of looking forward to reading some more. Once started however, the wonderfully engaging tone of The Widow's Tale doesn't make the option of putting the book down before the end an easy one.