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eBook Mad Toy download

by Michele Aynesworth,Roberto Arlt

eBook Mad Toy download ISBN: 0822329115
Author: Michele Aynesworth,Roberto Arlt
Publisher: Duke University Press Books (July 18, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 184
ePub: 1901 kb
Fb2: 1509 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf doc rtf lit
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary

Michele McKay Aynesworth and Duke University are to be applauded for their efforts in bringing this novel to the english speaking reader. That it has taken nearly 80 years is an International literary scandal.

Michele McKay Aynesworth and Duke University are to be applauded for their efforts in bringing this novel to the english speaking reader. Others should have similar courage and belief in Arlt's work and insist his last 2 novels be translated without delay.

Mad Toy, acclaimed by many as Arlt’s best novel, is set against the chaotic background of Buenos Aires in the .

Mad Toy, acclaimed by many as Arlt’s best novel, is set against the chaotic background of Buenos Aires in the early twentieth century. Roberto Arlt, celebrated in Argentina for his tragicomic, punch-in-the-jaw writing during the 1920s and 1930s, was a forerunner of Latin American boom and postboom novelists such as Gabriel García Márquez and Isabel Allende. Mad Toy, acclaimed by many as Arlt’s best novel, is set against the chaotic background of Buenos Aires in the early twentieth century.

See if your friends have read any of Michele Aynesworth's books. Michele Aynesworth’s Followers. None yet. Michele Aynesworth. Michele Aynesworth’s books. A Drama of Our Time by. Fernando Sorrentino, Michele Aynesworth (Translator).

Roberto Arlt, celebrated in Argentina for his tragicomic, punch-in-the-jaw writing during the 1920s and 1930s, was a. .

Roberto Arlt, celebrated in Argentina for his tragicomic, punch-in-the-jaw writing during the 1920s and 1930s, was a forerunner of Latin American boom and postboom novelists such as Gabriel García Márquez and Isabel Allende. Set in the badlands of adolescence, where acts of theft and betrayal become metaphors for creativity, Mad Toy is equal parts pulp fiction, realism, detective story, expressionist drama, and creative memoir.

Mad Toy bears interesting resemblances as well to both Don Quixote and Luis Buñuel's classic naturalist film Los Olvidados. In addition to the novel's own considerable interest, Aynesworth's illuminating remarks about Arlt's vigorous "polyglot style" shed further light on a richly entertaining and unquestionably important work. It’s the story of Silvio Astier (told by himself in old age), a street thug inspired by the thrilling literature of outlaws and bandits, and educated in crime by his Fagin-like mentor Rengo (a charmer of a villain if there ever was one). Mad Toy bears interesting resemblances as well to both Don Quixote and Luis Buñuel’s classic naturalist film Los Olvidados.

Roberto Arlt, Michele McKay Aynesworth. Roberto Arlt, celebrated in Argentina for his tragicomic, punch-in-the-jaw writing during the 1920s and 1930s, was a forerunner of Latin American "boom" and "postboom" novelists such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Isabel Allende. Mad Toy, acclaimed by many as Arlt's best novel, is set against the chaotic background of Buenos Aires in the early twentieth century.

Roberto Arlt (1900-1942), celebrated in Argentina for his tragicomic, punch-in-the-jaw writing during the 1920s and 1930s, was a forerunner of Latin American boom and postboom novelists such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Isabel Allende. This title presents a set against the chaotic background of Buenos Aires in the early twentieth century.

Michele Aynesworth, a retired professor of comparative literature and award-winning translator, honed her . Mad Toy (Duke UP, 2002), her translation of Argentine Roberto Arlt’s novel El juguete rabioso, received the First Runner-up Soeurette-Diehl Fraser Award in 2002

Mad Toy (Duke UP, 2002), her translation of Argentine Roberto Arlt’s novel El juguete rabioso, received the First Runner-up Soeurette-Diehl Fraser Award in 2002. Her translation of French economist Charles Rist’s WWII diary, Season of Infamy (Indiana UP, 2016), was supported by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Kittredge Foundation.

The Mad Toy-About the Publisher About the PublisherHesperus Press is committed to bringing near what is far – far both in space and time. MoreLess Show More Show Less.

First published in 1920, The Mad Toy is set in Buenos Aires in the early twentieth century

First published in 1920, The Mad Toy is set in Buenos Aires in the early twentieth century. Feeling the alienation of youth, Silvio Astier's gang tours neighbourhoods, inflicting waves of petty crime, stealing from homes and shops until the police are forced to intervene. Drifting then from one career and subsequent crime to another, Silvio's main difficulty is his own intelligence, with which he grapples. Although astronomically famous in South America, Roberto Arlt's name is still relatively unknown in Anglophone circles, but the rising wave of appreciation of South American literature is bringing him to the fore.

Roberto Arlt, celebrated in Argentina for his tragicomic, punch-in-the-jaw writing during the 1920s and 1930s, was a forerunner of Latin American “boom” and “postboom” novelists such as Gabriel García Márquez and Isabel Allende. Mad Toy, acclaimed by many as Arlt’s best novel, is set against the chaotic background of Buenos Aires in the early twentieth century. Set in the badlands of adolescence, where acts of theft and betrayal become metaphors for creativity, Mad Toy is equal parts pulp fiction, realism, detective story, expressionist drama, and creative memoir. An immigrant son of a German father and an Italian mother, Arlt as a youth was a school dropout, poor and often hungry. In Mad Toy, he incorporates his personal experience into the lives of his characters. Published in 1926 as El juguete rabioso, the novel follows the adventures of Silvio Astier, a poverty-stricken and frustrated youth who is drawn to gangs and a life of petty crime. As Silvio struggles to bridge the gap between exuberant imagination and the sordid reality around him, he becomes fascinated with weapons, explosives, vandalism, and thievery, despite a desperate desire to rise above his origins. Flavored with a dash of romance, a hint of allegory, and a healthy dose of irony, the novel’s language varies from the cultured idiom of the narrator to the dialects and street slang of the novel’s many colorful characters. Mad Toy has appeared in numerous Spanish editions and has been adapted for the stage and for film. It is the second of Arlt’s novels to be translated into English.
Comments: (4)
Kerahuginn
The Publishers Weekly blurb and previous reviews, listed above under Womack's translation, actually refer to my translation MAD TOY published by Duke UP in 2002. In fact, if you click on "start reading now," you are referred to the Duke UP book, not this cheaper Hesperus version. And yet my translation doesn't even show up on Amazon's search engine now unless you search by my name. My version is based on the original 1926 publication of Arlt's novel, unlike this one. Mine also includes, in addition to a substantive Introduction and Note on the Translation, an appended chapter called "The Neighborhood Poet," which was originally intended by Arlt as a chapter in the novel. By coincidence, Hesperus/Womack have used the same title as my version with the simple addition of a "The." Nice going.
Ghile
I feel kind of let down. A read all the hype that preceded my purchasing of MAD TOY and thought that I was getting a true gem of a novel. However MAD TOY did not live up to its promise. Don't get me wrong, I still enjoyed MAD TOY but not as much as I thought that I would. I wanted to give MAD TOY four stars but I could not bring myself to do so. Three stars may not be enough; maybe three and a half stars. The story was good but I feel that something was missing - that something that makes a good novel great. I don't know what it is but I do know that I did not want more when I finished reading MAD TOY. Great novels always leave me wanting more. I would recommend Roberto Bolano instead. His 2666: A Novel and The Savage Detectives: A Novel have that greatness I refered to. I have not felt the need to look for more of Roberto Arlt's work. I cannot give MAD TOY a whole hearted recommendation however I would say if you were given a copy by all means read it.
Asyasya
Robert Arlt’s 1926 novel in James Womack’s felicitous translation, traces the life of Silvio Astier through the indignity and injustice of grinding poverty in Buenos Aires. Starting as a petty teenage thief, Astier moves on to work as a bookshop lackey, a military engineer recruit, and a paper salesman. All this despite his clear intellectual capability and intelligence. Others of his teenage gang become police agent or prison convict. Astier encounters Dickensian rogues, the indifferent bourgeoisie. The maternal bond remains strong. Throughout this melange Astier retains a sublime spiritual awareness which Arlt expresses in rarified beautific descriptive vignettes, and dreamy trance-like sections. Together with the value dilemma in its nuanced final scene, this writing renders the book sublime.
Naril
Perhaps the title should of been 'Angry Toy', as Arlt's vision is one of the urban, alienated protagonists of his work being God's Angry Toys. This is Arlt's first novel and contains the seeds of all his further output. The story relates the activities of one Silvio Astier, street kid, thief, exploited employee and betrayor. His story is told with enormous(and angry)energy. Whether in terse street slang or vignettes of poetic prose Arlt captures his characters deficiencies and virtues concisely.
This is not Borges streets of Buenos Aires, but the urban squalor, people pushed to their limits, yet displaying, humour and much tenderness. There is much compassion and insight into the female experience (if oblique) as in this following excerpt as Silvio reflects on his mothers love."I was too small to walk, and she, whipped by the shadows and frantic with worry, was walking along the roadside, carrying me in her arms, warming my knees with her breast,holding my small body stretched out against her tiny frame, and she was begging for my sake,and while she was giving me her breast, the heat of a sob dried her mouth, and she took the bread from her hungering mouth for my mouth, the sleep from her nights, in order to attend to my cries, and with her eyes shining, with her body clothed in shameful rags, so small and so sad, she would open like a veil to shelter my dreams."
Silvio's story of adolescent trials is in many way's Arlt's and reflect's his own upbringing in the back streets of Buenos Aries. That Silvio does "redeem" himself, through a betrayal, is an irony somteimes easily missed. This is an important Latin American novel by an important Latin author. Michele McKay Aynesworth and Duke University are to be applauded for their efforts in bringing this novel to the english speaking reader. That it has taken nearly 80 years is an International literary scandal. Others should have similar courage and belief in Arlt's work and insist his last 2 novels be translated without delay