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eBook A River Sutra download

by Gita Mehta

eBook A River Sutra download ISBN: 0749397926
Author: Gita Mehta
Publisher: Vintage Books / Random House; 3rd edition (1994)
Language: English
Pages: 292
ePub: 1226 kb
Fb2: 1633 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: txt lrf azw mbr
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary

Gita Mehta writes beautifully in A River Sutra.

Gita Mehta writes beautifully in A River Sutra. That makes this book a very pleasant read, but it is not the kind of literary fiction that it is dressed up to be. There are short plots wrapped up in a couple of chapters, one chapter to introduce the character and one chapter to explain why he/she is in Narmada. Apart from a sophisticated style and diction, frail characterisation and exciting plots make this book more of a popular read.

GITA MEHTA a river sutra PENGUIN BOOKS Contents Introduction 1 2 The Monk’s Story 3 4 The Teacher’s Story 5 6 7 The Executive’s Story . Gita Mehta is an award-winning documentary film-maker and author

GITA MEHTA a river sutra PENGUIN BOOKS Contents Introduction 1 2 The Monk’s Story 3 4 The Teacher’s Story 5 6 7 The Executive’s Story 8 9 1. Gita Mehta is an award-winning documentary film-maker and author. She lives in London, NewYork and India.

Gita Mehta (née Patnaik; born 1943) is an Indian writer and documentary filmmaker

Gita Mehta (née Patnaik; born 1943) is an Indian writer and documentary filmmaker. Born in Delhi into a well-known Odia family, she is the daughter of Biju Patnaik, an Indian independence activist and a Chief Minister in post-independence Odisha, then known as Orissa. Her younger brother Naveen Patnaik has been the Chief Minister of Odisha since 2000. She completed her education in India and at the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom

Gita Mehta’s A River Sutra is a very good novel for the summer days that stretch like toffee, for evenings on a balcony of a mountain cabin or afternoons on a hammock in an apple orchard

Gita Mehta’s A River Sutra is a very good novel for the summer days that stretch like toffee, for evenings on a balcony of a mountain cabin or afternoons on a hammock in an apple orchard. I read it in my parents’ garden in Berlin, listening to squirrels throwing walnuts and acorns and woodpeckers making characteristic noises high up in the Scots pines.

An elderly bureaucrat escapes the world to run a guest house on the banks of India's holiest river, the Narmada, only to find he has made the wrong choice. Too many lives converge here. Among those who disturb his tranquility are a privileged young executive bewitched by a mysterious lover; a novice Jain monk who has abandoned opulence for poverty; a heartbroken woman with a golden voice; an ascetic and the child he has saved fromprostitution. Through their stories A River Sutra explores the fragile longings of the human heart and the sacred power of the river.

Or perhaps it is ending here ate them

Or perhaps it is ending here ate them. First I should describe the world I inhabited before I came here. I was a young executive in Calcutta's oldest tea company. Like myself, all my young colleagues had been educated at exclusive boarding schools and obtained their jobs through family connections.

A River Sutra is a collection of stories written by Gita Mehta and published in 1993. The book's stories are interconnected by both a geographical reference (the Narmada River and the Narmada River Valley), and by the theme of diversity within Indian society, both present and past. Unlike some of Mehta's previous stories, the ones in A River Sutra feature only Indian characters.

With imaginative lushness and narrative elan, Mehta provides a novel that combines Indian storytelling with thoroughly modern perceptions into the nature of love-love both carnal and sublime, treacherous and redeeming.

A River Sutra by Gita Mehta and Publisher Vintage. Reflowable eTextbooks do not maintain the layout of a traditional bound book. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9780307780997, 0307780996. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780679752479, 0679752471. Reflowable eTextbooks may also contain embedded audio, video, or interactive components in addition to Bookshelf's standard study tools.

Comments: (7)
Dead Samurai
The story is about a man who retires from his government job and takes a post at a guest house deep in the jungle along the Narmada River. A variety of people cross his path, all offering different bits of spiritual advice. Although the stories and characters were interesting, I never felt a connection between them. He would begin a conversation with a monk, or a woman or a musician and then they would say, "Let me tell you a story."

The stories had different messages for the retired man looking to escape from life. For me at least, I got to the point I didn't want to hear any more stories. I wanted to know the main character's story. It was never told to the extent I wanted to find some satisfaction. The book is beautifully descriptive of the people and places. I didn't feel the stories came together as a cohesive unit. I know I often like things to be tied up in neat little packages and life doesn't resolve itself so easily. I didn't need a pretty bow, I only wanted to see how he processed in his own mind, the lessons told by others.

A River Sutra is wonderfully written and has much to teach. I wasn't in the right mindset to learn from it even though I thought I was ready.
Tall
This book is laid out and introduced like a novel, but it actually reads like a collection of almost unrelated episodes and characters seen through the eyes of a high ranking civil servant who decided to "withdraw from the world" after his wife passed away. The childless senior officer applies for a position of manager of a resthouse on the bank of the mystic, mysterious, romantic and holy Narmada River.

Gita Mehta paints a beautiful picture of the Narmada River. It winds through vast, lush jungles. On its banks, are tribal people and their curious practices, ascetics seeking enlightenment and pilgrims walking the entire length of the river. Every now and then, the body of an ascetic floats down the river. It would seem that nothing interesting would ever happen here.

It is here that our protagonist meets a whole list of diverse characters whose bizarre experiences and illustrious backgrounds provide many eyebrow-raising episodes. Some of these characters have come to seek refuge. Some have come to find their loved ones and some seek "exorcism". A diamond dealer's son, a graduate from the UK who decides to become Jain monk. A music teacher who trains a blind boy to be star, only to lead the child genius to a tragic end. A genteel girl who falls in love with her bandit kidnapper. A womaniser who mends his ways, has a love spell cast on him and breaks the spell by embracing desire once more, helped by tribal people on the Narmada who deal with desire in vastly different ways to the ascetics.

From the sober, caustic tone of Karma Cola, Gita Mehta takes on a totally different tone in this book. She gets romantic and passes no judgement on the occult. In fact, it would seem that the author accepts some of the supernatural explanations.

Gita Mehta writes beautifully in A River Sutra. That makes this book a very pleasant read, but it is not the kind of literary fiction that it is dressed up to be. There are short plots wrapped up in a couple of chapters, one chapter to introduce the character and one chapter to explain why he/she is in Narmada. Apart from a sophisticated style and diction, frail characterisation and exciting plots make this book more of a popular read.

I'll give it 5 stars if it's a collection of short stories that render the protaginist redundant. As a novel-like piece, the protaginist seems to be conveniently placed just to be an observer to bizarre happenings. It's an excellent read, but not the kind of literature I expected.

Karma Cola: Marketing the Mystic East

Video Night in Kathmandu: And Other Reports from the Not-So-Far East
Nilasida
very interesting book
Vinainl
Get it, read it. Struggle with desire for the rest of your life.
Awene
An excellent book with a great collection of stories. I enjoyed reading this book in class. It was shipped to me in great quality as well.
Vaua
Stories within a story, a dazzling insight into the Indian culture, its myths, its traditions and everything that is sacred and holy.
Wnex
As hard as I tried, I could not get into this book. It's just not what I was expecting. It was like something written for a child, maybe it is. JMHO.
mystical mood discribing,,An interesting and strange book