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eBook Quicksand download

by Jun'Ichiro Tanizaki

eBook Quicksand download ISBN: 0099485613
Author: Jun'Ichiro Tanizaki
Publisher: Vintage Uk (October 31, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 224
ePub: 1797 kb
Fb2: 1857 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: azw mbr docx mbr
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary

Junichirō Tanizaki was born in 1886 in Tokyo, where his family owned a printing establishment. He lives in Arlington, Massachusetts. By junichirō tanizaki.

Junichirō Tanizaki was born in 1886 in Tokyo, where his family owned a printing establishment. He studied Japanese literature at Tokyo Imperial University, and his first published work, a one-act play, appeared in 1910 in a literary magazine he helped to found. Tanizaki lived in the cosmopolitan Tokyo area until the earthquake of 1923, when he moved to the gentler and more cultivated Kyoto-Osaka region, the scene of his great novel The Makioka Sisters (1943–1948).

I found reading Junichiro Tanizaki’s novel Quicksand a bit disappointing as compared to his Some Prefer Nettles since I enjoyed reading its early chapters but I did not in the middle till the end. Essentially, the plot focuses on a kind of love triangle arguably mischievous, sensual and semi-erotic related to Mrs. Sonoko Kakiuchi (as I through the story), Mitsuko and Watanuki whose significant role first appears in Chapter 11.

Junichiro Tanizaki - Quicksand (html)/images/00007. A NOTE ABOUT THE AUTHOR Junichirō Tanizaki was born in 1886 in Tokyo, where his family owned a printing establishment. DlUlalcoal nomi lalP4-L. Tanizaki lived in the cosmopolitan Tokyo area until the earthquake of 1923, when he moved to the gentler and more cultivated Kyoto-Osaka region, the scene of his great novel The Makioka Sisters (1943–48).

20th C writer Junichiro Tanizaki would have known ever detail of The Lovers' Suicide from Buraku and Kabuki, and . Quicksand is a tale of obsessive love and the way manipulative people snare others into their emotional traps

20th C writer Junichiro Tanizaki would have known ever detail of The Lovers' Suicide from Buraku and Kabuki, and however bizarre and modernistic Tanizaki might seem to an English reader, he was profoundly aware of his place in Japanese tradition. Quicksand", a novel written in the middle of his career, is Bunraku to the core - a tale of a lovers' triangle, of obsession and jealousy, and of suicide, with just a hint of "possession" by fox-spirits. Quicksand is a tale of obsessive love and the way manipulative people snare others into their emotional traps. I enjoyed the story until the ending, where things get a bit too contrived.

Junichiro Tanizaki, Minato. This page in maintained by the author's . publisher Vintage Books. Quicksand is a silkily nuanced novel of erotic gamesmanship and obsession

Junichiro Tanizaki, Minato. Quicksand is a silkily nuanced novel of erotic gamesmanship and obsession. Sonoko Kakiuchi, an Osaka lady of a good family, married to a dully respected lawyer, tells a story of temptation and betrayal. Sonoko is infatuated with the beautiful art student and femme fatale Mitsuko, a woman so seductive and heartless she can even turn Sonoko’s husband into her own accomplice. Filled with intrigue and treacherous romance, readers will be entranced by Tanizaki’s seminal novel.

t at first, until it occurred to me that she couldn’t be staying very long at the hospital, not to mention the danger of my husband’s deciding to stop in on his way home from work! Just as I was racking my brain over what to do, Ume came up with this new idea.

Quicksand (卍, Manji) is a novel by the Japanese author Jun'ichirō Tanizaki. It was written in serial format between 1928 and 1930 for the magazine Kaizō. The last of Tanizaki's major novels translated into English, it concerns a four-way bisexual love affair between upper-crust denizens of Osaka. The Japanese title, Manji, refers to the four-pronged Buddhist swastika, a symbol of the four lovers. The English title refers to the destructive cycle of obsession and jealousy faced by the four main characters.

Read Quicksand, by Junichiro Tanizaki online on Bookmate – Sonoko Kakiuchi is a cultured Osaka lady . At is centre – seductive, manipulating, enslaving – is one of Tanizaki's most extraordinary characters, the beautiful and corrupt art student Mitsuko

Read Quicksand, by Junichiro Tanizaki online on Bookmate – Sonoko Kakiuchi is a cultured Osaka lady, unfortunately widowed young. But her story is unsettlingly at odds with her image. At is centre – seductive, manipulating, enslaving – is one of Tanizaki's most extraordinary characters, the beautiful and corrupt art student Mitsuko. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Comments: (7)
Drelalak
Tanizaki's obsession with destructive relationships is at its best in this novel. Mitsuko is a very dark and fascinating character, but Tanizaki doesn't go deep enough into her, though he couldn't since the story is told from Sonoko's POV. Her husband just goes along for the ride which is understandable and all leads to the inevitable ending. Did Sonoko deserve what she got? I wonder. Tanizaki gives you the feeling that she certainly couldn't help it, which can be said for many of us. I agree with one reviewer that the novel didn't particularly come together as well as his other novels, but Tanizaki's misfire is still better than most writers' best. Still, it would be best to read some of his other novels before trying this one. Start with Seven Japanese Tales to get a taste of him before going on to his best work The Makioka Sisters, and then come back to this.
Hudora
Quicksand is a tale of obsessive love and the way manipulative people snare others into their emotional traps. I enjoyed the story until the ending, where things get a bit too contrived. Very much ahead of its time, though, for its depiction of a lesbian love affair.
Stick
Bunraku is the unique puppet theater of Japan, in which nearly life-size puppets, manipulated by visible puppeteers in black, mime the classic melodramas of Chikamatsu while the narrative is chanted to the accompaniment of the shamisen. Most famous of all Bunraku plays is "The Lovers' Suicide", a piece of theater as central to Japanese culture as The Iliad was to Greek or Goethe's faust is to German. 20th C writer Junichiro Tanizaki would have known ever detail of The Lovers' Suicide from Buraku and Kabuki, and however bizarre and modernistic Tanizaki might seem to an English reader, he was profoundly aware of his place in Japanese tradition. "Quicksand", a novel written in the middle of his career, is Bunraku to the core -- a tale of a lovers' triangle, of obsession and jealousy, and of suicide, with just a hint of "possession" by fox-spirits. Even the narrative structure smacks of puppetry; the central figure of the lovers' triangle 'chants' the events to an audience of one, presumably the novelist himself.

What begins as erotic teasing evolves slowly into masochistic hysteria and emotional pornography. It would be easy to hate this novel if it were written by an Italian or an Icelander, but from within the insular semiotics of Japanese literature, it makes a kind of gaudy sense. Western readers will inevitably interpret it as a 'psychological' depiction of obsession, to which a Japanese reader might respond "so be it, but then all of Japanese history is a depiction of obsession." Are you ready to perceive beauty in an overwrought, maudlin desperation? Possibly then you are Japanese enough to appreciate Tanizaki.

I'd love to be able to read Tanizaki in Japanese. I studied the language furiously for several years, I lived in Kyoto for a year, I became fluent enough to have meaningful conversations with Japanese friends though never fluent enough to follow their exchanges with each other, but I never came close to knowing enough "kanji" characters to read Tanizaki. I noticed, curiously, that the more fluent I became in Japanese, the more skeptical my Japanese friends became of my communication. At a certain point, it seemed, my access to the culture had to be all or nothing, an impossible assimilation which would have required me to stop being myself. Reading Japanese novels - Tanizaki, Kawabata, Oe - often gives me the same eerie feeling of being ineluctably foreign, a "gai-jin" to the soles of my feet.

I've rated this novel at four stars solely in comparison to Tanizaki's other masterpieces - The Makioka Sisters, Some Prefer Nettles, Naomi - rather than on an absolute scale. Compared to a Dan Brown or a Joyce Carol Oates, even a laundry list from Tanizaki would deserve a whole constellation of stars.
Anarius
Not an enjoyable piece, yet another example of the broad Japanese literary fixation on tales of suicide. No great prose and no depth to the character study. The major characters were shallow, absorbed in their obsessive behaviours and their various (dull) sexual relationships with each other. There was no passion and little sense of time (1927) or place (Osaka and surrounds).

The construct of the book as a monologue by the main protagonist, Sonoko, direct to the author was ineffective and added nothing to the story. It felt like a contrivance by the author to give him a firsthand connection to the characters and events - unnecessary and unrealistic.

This is Quicksand indeed, which drowns the reader in the tedium of a lacklustre read. Perhaps this tale of lesbian love and menage a trois was considered an erotic melodrama at the time it was written, but it has not aged well. If you want a trip through the depths of the Japanese dark-side, then stick with Mishima. His works have the literary merit and tension that is lacking in Quicksand.
Inertedub
no comments!
OTANO
Beautiful, dark drama. Two women, one man and a suffering ghost in a domestic love story. One of Tanizaki best.
Moswyn
Scandalous! ~
Awesome condition of the product. Amazing book to read. Will recommend to anybody, who likes Japanese literature. Enjoy the reading!!!