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eBook Mohawk download

by Richard Russo

eBook Mohawk download ISBN: 0375412867
Author: Richard Russo
Publisher: Knopf; 1st hardcover ed edition (May 8, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 304
ePub: 1747 kb
Fb2: 1484 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mobi txt docx rtf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary

Richard Russo is one of America's funniest literary novelists. I never go wrong reading a book written by Richard Russo. He is my kind of author! Thank you for not disappointing me again.

Richard Russo is one of America's funniest literary novelists. This novel is based in small-town New England, and all readers who have ever lived in a small town anywhere in America will feel like they're in on one of the wittiest jokes they've ever heard the entire time they read this book. Some characters want out of the town but seem never to succeed. Others never think of leaving.

Richard Russo is a new writer to watch. Mohawk is a wonderfully satisfying tale. Russo, Richard, 1949-. Vintage contemporaries).

RICHARD RUSSO lives with his wife in Camden, Maine, and in Boston. With moments of great comedy alternating with others of rueful understanding, That Old Cape Magic is unlike anything Richard Russo has ever written. In 2002 he was awarded th. e Pulitzer Prize for Empire Falls. Please visit ww. aknopf. Richard Russo, Mohawk. Series: ) Thank you for reading books on BookFrom.

Mohawk is only my second Richard Russo novel. It felt familiar though, as it's very similar to Everybody's Fool with its myriad of characters, small-town setting and domesticity. It gave me that feeling you get when coming across an old friend you lost contact with, but when you meet again the spark reignites as you had never been apart.

Mohawk by Richard Russo Richard Russo is one of America’s funniest literary novelists. Richard Russo lives in coastal Maine with his wife and their two daughters. He has written five novles: Mohawk, The Risk Pool, Nobodys Fool, Straight Man and Empire Falls, and a collection of short stories, The Whore’s Child. Mohawk remains today as it was described then: A first novel with all the assurance of a mature writer at the peak of form and ambition, Mohawk is set in upstate New York and chronicles over a dozen lives in a leather town, long after the tanneries have started closing down.

In Mohawk, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Russo explores these lives with profound compassion and flint-hard wit. Out of derailed ambitions and old loves, secret hatreds and communal myths, he has created a richly plotted. Out of derailed ambitions and old loves, secret hatreds and communal myths, he has created a richly plotted, densely populated, and wonderfully written novel that captures every nuance of America's backyard. His books, Empire Falls, Nobody's Fool, and Straight Man are American classics. So I decided to go back and read his first novel, Mohawk.

1986: Mohawk (Vintage Books). Richard Russo knows small town America.

In Mohawk, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Richard Russo, explores these lives with profound compassion and flint-hard wit. Out of derailed ambitions and old loves, secret hatreds and communal myths, he has created a richly plotted, densely populated, and wonderfully written novel that captures. Out of derailed ambitions and old loves, secret hatreds and communal myths, he has created a richly plotted, densely populated, and wonderfully written novel that captures every nuance of America’s backyard. Mohawk, New York, is one of those small towns that lie almost entirely on the wrong side of the tracks.

Richard Russo (born July 15, 1949) is an American novelist, short story writer, screenwriter, and teacher. Russo was born in Johnstown, New York, and raised in nearby Gloversville. He earned a bachelor's degree, a Master of Fine Arts degree, and a Doctor of Philosophy degree from the University of Arizona, which he attended from 1967 through 1979.

The town of Mohawk may be provincial but it's far from sleepy

Mohawk, New York, is one of those small towns that lie almost entirely on the wrong side of the tracks. Its citizens, too, have fallen on hard times. Dallas Younger, a star athlete in high school, now drifts from tavern to poker game, losing money, and, inevitably, another set of false teeth.

Originally published in 1986 in the Vintage Contemporaries paperback series—and reissued now in hardcover alongside his masterful new novel, Empire Falls—Richard Russo’s Mohawk remains today as it was described then: A first novel with all the assurance of a mature writer at the peak of form and ambition, Mohawk is set in upstate New York and chronicles over a dozen lives in a leather town, long after the tanneries have started closing down. Ranging over three generations—and clustered mainly in two clans, the Grouses and the Gaffneys—these remarkably various lives share only the common human dilemmas and the awesome physical and emotional presence of Mohawk itself.For this is a town like Winesburg, Ohio or Our Town, in our time, that encompasses a plethora of characters, events and mysteries. At once honestly tragic and sharply, genuinely funny, Mohawk captures life, then affirms it.
Comments: (7)
Fawrindhga
With his Pulitzer Prize winning and best selling novel Empire Falls, Richard Russo has become a well-known author. In Mohawk, his first novel, we see, if somewhat imperfectly, the writer he would become.
Like his other novels, Mohawk is the story of a small town in the northeastern part of the U.S. The town - in this case Mohawk - is a place on the wane as the industry that fueled it peters out. In this story, we follow the adventures of Dallas Younger, his ex-wife Anne and their son Randall in the late '60s and early '70s. Dallas lives a life of general irresponsibility and likes it that way. Anne pines away for her cousin's husband, a wheelchair-bound man who she sleeps with every twenty years or so. Randall has his own issues to deal with including his efforts to evade the draft.
As with Russo's other stories, the characters are more important than the plot, and he is able to make them compelling enough that we want to keep reading. Compared with his other novels, this one is rather serious, although there is some humor.
This novel is good but not as great as his other books; in a way, this book is like an exhibition game before the regular season; we get a general feel for what Russo does but it is still just warming up. For example, in Dallas, we see the prototype for the deeper Sully in Nobody's Fool. Other elements of this story are revisited in his other stories.
I would recommend this book, but don't judge Russo by this story. He's just getting warmed up here.
Cordanara
It took me a little while to really get into reading this book. Actually had to put it down and read Empire Falls first, then I went back and read Mohawk and thoroughly enjoyed it. So don't give up, keep going and you'll find I thoroughly enjoy will read.
heart of sky
Decent read, but it leaves a lot of loose ends. Russo seems to write a lot about a small town near Schenectady that is dying and has a polluted creek. Many of the same characters with different names. This one leaves us wondering about the kid and a couple of widows. Maybe he will move to Rhode Island next?
Thundershaper
A solid novel, but short of the standard he was to set later with works like 'Nobody's Fool' and 'Straight Man'.

It isn't hard to see why this was first published by a small house, and only re-issued by a major company once the name Russo became a bankable selling point. Some startling insights and fine turns of phrase, but some clinkers and cliches as well. There is simply too much material, easily enough to stock three full length novels, so we get sketches where we'd like portraits, and the plot doesn't so much wander as careen wildly.

Easy to see how it launched his career, though-- the core Russo's talent is on full display. Every character is treated with respect, even affection.

I'd class it about equal to the over-rated 'Empire Falls', a bit behind the under appreciated 'Straight Man', and well back of 'Nobody's Fool', his quiet masterpiece.

Worth your time if you are already a fan, but not best place to enter his world for the first time.
Akinonris
Richard Russo is one of America's funniest literary novelists. This novel is based in small-town New England, and all readers who have ever lived in a small town anywhere in America will feel like they're in on one of the wittiest jokes they've ever heard the entire time they read this book. Some characters want out of the town but seem never to succeed. Others never think of leaving. Others have thought of it and want to stay. All of which creates a very real and very humorous tale of small town life.
This story isn't small-minded in its small-town setting, nor is it simply humorous. Large personal issues that everyone, despite where he/she lives, must deal with are honestly and intelligently explored in this novel (e.g. a father's death, cancer, divorce, growing up, growing old, being poor, being rich then becoming poor).
The only reason I rank this novel with 4 stars instead of 5 is that it does seem to be slightly too long. It is still a great read, but if it were 20-25 pages shorter, it would have kept the energy it started with. I don't mean to suggest that it ever becomes boring, but it came out of the gates at a sprint and slowed down a bit toward the end.
In short, I advise reading this book. Despite any flaws it may have, it is better than most books I've read recently. It avoids being overly serious without becoming trite humor. I would also advise reading his novels Risk Pool and Straight Man which are also humorous and intelligent reads.
Ce
I always enjoy Russos books. Im not sure his women would act as he has them doing. I read a lot and it seems to me , few male writes can write true as far as women are concerned.They always have them acting in ways they would like instea of how they probably would.
Paster
I never go wrong reading a book written by Richard Russo. He is my kind of author! Thank you for not disappointing me again.
This is Russo's first novel, and it feels like a first novel. Some chapters feel like MFA writing assignments, and you can tell who his influential authors are. At the same time, he already had his gift for creating believable characters and for developing conflicts that never quite fall over into melodrama. People who like Risk Pool and Nobody's Fool should go back to see where he started.