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eBook Reflections from a Bookshop Window download

by Clive Linklater,David Hobbs

eBook Reflections from a Bookshop Window download ISBN: 095239880X
Author: Clive Linklater,David Hobbs
Publisher: Hole in the Wall Publishing; First Edition edition (August 19, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 196
ePub: 1120 kb
Fb2: 1461 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: rtf lrf mobi docx
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary

Reflections From a Bookshop Window book.

Reflections From a Bookshop Window book. His scheme - his dream - is to progressively reinvest earnings in ever more expensive stock to come out ahead, really ahead, at the end of the year. Well written, if a bit whiney which perfectly suits the author's striving and self-caricature. Such a hard working bloke, for such lit A bit wacky but ultimately admirable narrative of a year in a British bookseller's life.

I think this is really a jewel of a book! I fouond it in a bargain bin in a little book shop in Scotland. I am so glad I picked it up, it really is a great read. It's a funny, nonchalant tale of a lone book proprietor's scheme to turn two pounds into a fortune by year's end. I really enjoyed reading this book and would definately recommend it! 0. Report.

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Listen to books in audio format. Clive Cussler, author of the best-selling Dirk Pitt novels Arctic Drift and The Treasure of Khan, and co-author Paul Kemprecos unravel a tangled web of conspiracy and greed in Lost City, the fifth novel of the action-packed NUMA Files series. Cussler is in top form with this galloping tale of derring-do and world domination' Sunday Express.

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In Christian Reflections . Lewis brings his vast and original intellect to bear on a wealth of subjects, including ethics, historicism, Christianity and culture. This selection of essays and papers, drawn from all stages of his career, presents Lewis at his most varied and profound. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

The Gutter Bookshop is an independent bookshop in Temple Bar & Dalkey in Dublin, Ireland. Contact The Gutter Bookshop, Dublin on Messenger. Independent book shop. Price range £. Hours 10:00 - 18:30. See actions taken by the people who manage and post content. Page created – 26 September 2009.

Are you sure you want to remove Reflections from a Bookshop Window from your list? Reflections from a Bookshop Window. Published May 1999 by New Atlantean Pr. Written in English.

In his 1990 piece, Beyond Realism and Marxism, outlines the flaws in Realism International Relations theory, the English School theorizing, and Marxist International Relations theory.

This is a simple book, meant to make your life more peaceful, more rewarding, and more awakened.

Reflections From The Shield is a unique true life, entertaining adventure story that inspires laughter and tears. A life story so exciting it had to be told

Reflections From The Shield is a unique true life, entertaining adventure story that inspires laughter and tears. A life story so exciting it had to be told. Readers are treated to horrific crime stories, while at the same time provided insight and education into the workings of the criminal justice system in New York State.

Comments: (2)
Butius
Clive Linklater runs a second-hand bookshop in Hastings, England. REFLECTIONS FROM A BOOKSHOP WINDOW is his take on the used book trade, at least how it existed in England around 1990 - i.e., before the Internet. What separates this book from most other books on second-hand bookselling is Linklater's campaign to be humorous from the first to the last page. Unfortunately, much of his humor is sophomoric at best, and it soon wears thin. I usually am receptive to books about the book trade, but here the slapstick became so annoying that I could barely manage to hang in there until book's end.

Some of Linklater's humor is scatological in nature. There is, for example, an entire chapter detailing, and comparing, the explosive effect on his bowels of an Indian curry and that of his wife's steam pudding. Another frequent motif is sex - for example, his sporadic efforts to cajole his wife into engaging in it, the story of "Wilson's willy", and how "every time I get on a train, I seem to end up sitting opposite a young girl wearing an incredibly short skirt". To that last observation, Linklater appends the parenthetical explanation, "The young girls are wearing the short skirts, not me" - which serves as an example of his frequent linguistic funnery.

It's not all silly. There are some decent jokes and there also are some cogent, witty social observations, such as this one on the definition of the poor: "According to the Labour Party, the poor are those who cannot afford satellite television and a timeshare apartment on the Costa Del Sol. According to the Conservative Party, the poor are those who live in cardboard boxes that are less than ⅞ths of a centimeter thick. * * * According to my definition, the poor are all those people who think that £100 is a lot of money."

And if one is patient and can tolerate the tomfoolery, one can learn about such things as book auctions, booksellers who are congenitally obnoxious to customers, and the mysterious phenomenon by which certain used books never find their way to a customer but instead are sold from dealer to dealer to dealer, seemingly ad infinitum. But again, this account of the second-hand book trade was from before the Internet, which I suspect has changed the business as much in the UK as it has here in the States. Even so, I suppose that book dealers still are plagued by prospective sellers expecting good, hard cash in return for boxes of Readers Digest condensed novels.
Nidor
I think this is really a jewel of a book! I fouond it in a bargain bin in a little book shop in Scotland. I am so glad I picked it up, it really is a great read. It's a funny, nonchalant tale of a lone book proprietor's scheme to turn two pounds into a fortune by year's end. I really enjoyed reading this book and would definately recommend it!