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eBook Blind Faith download

by Sagarika Ghose

eBook Blind Faith download ISBN: 8172235674
Author: Sagarika Ghose
Publisher: HarperCollins (September 1, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 274
ePub: 1725 kb
Fb2: 1476 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: docx lrf lrf txt
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary

Sagarika Ghose’s Blind Faith is gripping novel. Starting from London, the novel traverses sandy Goa, glitzy Delhi and the holy Kumbh Mela.

Sagarika Ghose’s Blind Faith is gripping novel. The story can be looked at as Mia’s journey in finding herself, her belief and her faith through the people she comes across after she marries Vik and moves to India.

Город: New DelhiПодписчиков: 4 млнО себе: Journalist,Op-ed columnist,author: Indir.

Город: New DelhiПодписчиков: 4 млнО себе: Journalist,Op-ed columnist,author: Indira,India’s Most Powerful PM’ & Why I Am A Liberal.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Sagarika Ghose (Author). Blind Faith offers another kind of humor - it's this bizarre world in all its vulgar, egotistic, self-righteous rigidity, as seen through the eyes of the hapless Trafford, that gives the book the humor apparent in its every paragraph - sardonic but ultimately humane. One person found this helpful.

A stunning and sumptuous tale of the boundaries between love and hate, truth and deception, set against the anticipation for the Kumbh Mela: the biggest festival in India. When Mia, acutely depressed by the suicide of her artist father, meets Karna, a young and mesmeric guru who bears a startling resemblance to a figure in her father's painting, she feels compelled to follow him all the way from London to India

Brilliant, bold, heartfelt, and transcendent, Blind Faith is a provocative reexamination of the human condition, of reason that binds, hate that liberates, and love that strangles.

The distraught daughter of an artist who committed suicide, Mia first meets Karna in London. Brilliant, bold, heartfelt, and transcendent, Blind Faith is a provocative reexamination of the human condition, of reason that binds, hate that liberates, and love that strangles. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. A stunning and sumptuous tale of the boundaries between love and hate, truth and deception, set against the anticipation for the Kumbh Mela: the biggest festival in India. When Mia, acutely depressed by the suicide of her artist father, meets Karna, a young and mesmeric guru who bears a startling resemblance to a figure in her father's painting, she feels compelled to follow him all the way from London to India. Troubled by Indi's anguish, and by her own strange journey into duplicitous love, Mia realizes she must travel even further-to the Kumb Mela religious pilgrimage-for a different perspective on her clouded and confused life.

Ghose is the author of two novels, The Gin Drinkers, published in 1998, and Blind Faith, in 2004. The Gin Drinkers was also published in the Netherlands. Ghose published a widely acclaimed biography of former Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, Indira: India's Most Powerful Prime Minister (Juggernaut Books) in 2017. In her 2018 non-fiction book, Why I Am A Liberal: A Manifesto For Indians Who Believe in Individual Freedom, Ghose describes herself as a liberal who believes in rule of law, limited government, robust institutions and individual liberty.

When Mia, acutely depressed by the suicide of her father, meets Karna, a young Indian guru who seems to have walked straight out of her fathers painting of the Kumbh Mela, she feels compelled to follow him all the way from London to India. And if marrying Vik, the suave corporate, will help her reach him, then so be it ... In India, Mia hears of Indi, Viks accomplished, inordinately attractive mother who cannot cease raging against the limits imposed on her, by her blindness, her beauty, and her clinging son. To make sense of Indis anguished attempts to break free, and her own journey chasing a duplicitous love, Mia must travel to the Kumbh, to the heart of her fathers painting, where life, she learns, allows another perspectivea stunningly beautiful account of lifes distorted perceptions: of reason that blinds, of hate that liberates and of love that strangles.
Comments: (7)
Fonceiah
Creepy and satirical, a look at an exaggerated world where social media is not only encouraged, it’s mandatory.

Imagine a world where you are watched 24/7, encouraged to share you most intimate moments… losing your virginity, for instance, streamed live and available on your social media feed for anyone to watch! A world where to do otherwise is considered blasphemous and heretical. This is the tongue and cheek world created by Ben Elton in, “Blind Faith.”

There are obvious over tones of Orwell’s “1984,” Huxley’s “A Brave New World,” and any number of other dystopian/government run amuck stories, but Elton manages to terrify and amuse at the same time by mixing in some very familiar modern day staples.

The book can be a bit crass for some readers, but then I have yet to find a book that doesn’t offend someone, somewhere.

As for me, I highly recommend it. It is a quick read, under 4 hours for most. Enjoy!
Adrielmeena
Ben Elton has outdone himself in Blind Faith. His close observations of the perils and absurdities of modern life have resulted in a startling dystopia that enfolds humanity's current contradictions in its enormous, all-embracing arms. It's a mash-up of New Age fundamentalism and evangelical display; meaningless hugs and the modesty of nakedness. Everything is shared. Everything is "liked." It's a selfie kind of world where nothing's private any more and withholding any information about yourself is bad, wicked bad.

In every tenement there are tenants, and in every tenant's flat there is a screen as well as a webcam. It's a give and take sort of deal, wherein tenants are expected by the Lord to share their love-making, the birth of their children, and all the sundry details of their shabby lives. Sexuality, of course, is included. Everyone, male and female, is expected to be sexed up at all times, and for girls a first breast implant is a veritable rite of passage and is expected to be broadcast, as is her Cherry Pop. This is known as sharing, and is what the Lord wants. Complete and utter sharing, down to the bone.

Our hero, Trafford, lives his silently desperate life in one of these tenements with his wife, Chantorria, and their newborn baby, Caitlin Happymeal. They're all monitored by the brutally jovial Barbieheart, who watches out for any deviations from the laws of the Lord of Love. Trafford works at NatDat, the National Data Collection Bank, which is so overcomplicated and overstuffed with information that it could not possibly find anything or follow up on anything, even if someone wanted it to.

Oh, and did I mention while this is all going on, flood waters from melting icecaps have resulted in major death and disaster around the rest of the world? And that since inoculation of youngsters has been made illegal, babies only have a 50/50 chance of living beyond childhood?

If you're expecting a joke-fest from Blind Faith, you have come to the wrong place. Instead, watch Blackadder again, or see Mr. Elton on stage. Blind Faith offers another kind of humor - it's this bizarre world in all its vulgar, egotistic, self-righteous rigidity, as seen through the eyes of the hapless Trafford, that gives the book the humor apparent in its every paragraph -- sardonic but ultimately humane.
Bedy
This is one of Ben Elton's best. It takes a while for one to realize that the action takes place in a Britain 100 + years hence. The events and lives of the characters may seem ludicrous and some of the technology described is mostly with us now, but I can see the seeds of intolerance, the ignorance, and extreme conservatism have already been planted. I am living in Texas, USA and cannot believe the amount of backward thinking, the lack of compassion, and "blind faith" that is on the increase. It is just as well I shall be dead by 2114!
Golkis
This post-apocalyptic nightmare world imagines what a world where we always get what we "want" would look like. Our protagonist struggles with an unnatural desire to not share his every thought and minor achievement over the internet. A coworker introduces him to a different worldview, and it changes his life.

I couldn't help but tear up at the end. Well created characters, great story. I don't want to say more for fear of giving away the story. Recommended read.
Foxanayn
My final rating for the book leaves me to give a "I like it" rating but I took off a star because while I enjoyed it, it came down to a predictable ending which wasn't really all that satisfying. There were also certain things that I felt made no sense in the world the author created.

One thing that sticks out to me is the part where they have to go to a concert and how women must sit on their mans shoulders for at least one song. Otherwise, it's disrespectful etc. I just felt that didn't make any sense. There are probably 2-3 of these types of situations through out the book that just didn't belong in the world in my opinion. Other than that, it was good. I bought this book on a whim. There was no excerpt to read so I bought this on "blind faith". The faith, God, and Lord talk made me nervous. I thought I made a wrong choice at first but I liked how that aspect turned out. So if someone is worried about this being about faith in God, it's not... really about that. It is more about science vs. faith.
Marr
What a disturbing tale. It truly was 1984 revisited. It was a book that hurt to read as to many similarities to current life present itself. Elton gave us a glimpse at a scary re-envisioned future.
Hellstaff
Ok but not very subtle message, ironically rather proselytizing in tone. I do agree with the philosophical position taken by the author though.
Excellent social commentary buried within a fantastical fiction storyline