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eBook Human Punk download

by John King

eBook Human Punk download ISBN: 0224060481
Author: John King
Publisher: Jonathan Cape; First Edition edition (2000)
Language: English
Pages: 352
ePub: 1964 kb
Fb2: 1714 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: azw doc mbr rtf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary

John King - London 2019 VegfestUK. John King is the author of nine novels.

John King - London 2019 VegfestUK. John King is the author of nine novels

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A rare novel set against a punk-rock background that works as a cultural document-punk and politics: a way of life.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A film based on the novel is in currently in development. For 15-year-old Joe Martin.

Human Punk is a novel by John King that tells the story of a group of boys who leave school in 1977 and the effect the emerging punk movement has on their lives. The book is largely based in Slough, a new town on the outskirts of London, famed for its industry and large trading estate. Human Punk follows the lives of main character Joe Martin and his friends Smiles, Dave and Chris across the next three decades. It has been widely translated abroad in countries such as France, Italy and Russia.

Praise for Human Punk ‘In its ambition and exuberance, Human Punk is a league ahead of much contemporary .

Praise for Human Punk ‘In its ambition and exuberance, Human Punk is a league ahead of much contemporary English fiction. -New Statesman ‘Evokes the punk era superbly. No part of this book may be transmitted by any means without permission in writing from the publisher. John King has asserted his right to be identified as the Author of the Work. ISBN: 978–1–62963–115–8. Library of Congress Control Number: 2015900711.

Another Anglocentric masterpiece by John King, Human Punk follows his motif of British culture, from his works regarding soccer and skinhead culture to this project on early punk rock and it's impact on British youth. Told in three parts and stretching over thirty years, it's King's epic, his experiment in telling the story of a life.

John King is the author of eight novels - The Football Factory, Headhunters, England Away, Human Punk, White . The Football Factory has been turned into a high-profile film and his books have been widely translated abroad.

John King is the author of eight novels - The Football Factory, Headhunters, England Away, Human Punk, White Trash, The Prison House, Skinheads and The Liberal Politics Of Adolf Hitler.

John King is the author of eight novels – The Football Factory, Headhunters, England Away, Human Punk, White Trash, The Prison House, Skinheads and The Liberal Politics Of Adolf Hitler.

King’s book is a neat confrontation of the middle-class fear that the values and beliefs of skinheads are, ultimately, not as extreme or unfamiliar as we. .It’s part of a loose trilogy, Human Punk and White Trash, King explains.

King’s book is a neat confrontation of the middle-class fear that the values and beliefs of skinheads are, ultimately, not as extreme or unfamiliar as we may care to admit. My idea was to be able to show that it happens each way, and there’s a unity between people, he explains. The whole interesting thing about skinheads is, they listened to black music in the sixties. I suppose one of the ideas was to write about a family, basically, and different generations. Adding to this is a set of inventive structural techniques which lend the book a sophisticated, edgy energy.

For fifteen-year-old Martin, the summer of 1977 means punk rock, reggae music, disco girls, stolen cars, and a job picking cherries with the gypsies

A rare novel set against a punk-rock background that works as a cultural document punk and politics: a way of life. For 15-year-old Joe Martin, growing up on the outskirts of West London, the summer of 1977 means punk rock, busy pubs, disco girls, stolen cars, social-club lager, cutthroat Teddy Boys, and a job picking cherries with the gypsies.

For Joe the summer of 1977 meant punk rock, fun and violence. Fast forward to 1988 and Joe is on the Trans-Siberian express coming to terms with his best mate's suicide back in 1977. In the present Joe still has to come to terms with Smiles's death.
Comments: (4)
Owomed
Often when punk music and culture appear in print or on film, the effect or purpose is either to deride the scene altogether as an unruly mob of foolish and destructive delinquents, or alternately as a sad celebration of an ideal doomed to failure.
British author John King's Human Punk, however, stands out as a more genuine coming-of-age story, prominently featuring the fictional Joe Martin's punk rock lifestyle without passing judgment on the phenomenon itself.
For many teenagers growing up around the London suburbs in 1977, punk is a way of life. Joe and friends Chris, Dave and Smiles get off on listening to the Clash, stomping poseur fashion punks with steel-toed DMs, wooing bleach-blonde girls at the dance clubs, and joyriding into London to catch the best concerts. Told from Joe's perspective, the story follows the boys as they get into trouble with girls, drugs, the police, and elder punk rocker Gary Wells, who tosses Joe and Smiles in a canal with lasting and tragic consequences.
Eleven years later, in 1988, Joe returns to England after years spent working in a Hong Kong bar when shocking news draws him back to hometown Slough. On the train ride through China, Russia, and Germany, he contemplates the injustices of human society in the context of reminiscences of fading childhood friendships. By the time Joe's story wraps up in the year 2000, Joe discovers that idle decisions affect legacies, and that some wrongs should not be forgiven.
As a study of boot-boy counterculture, what makes Human Punk interesting is that it is not about punk at all. To be sure, the music and influence is there, but King's novel focuses on characterization, creating a believable band of friends who have the qualities of punk rockers but are by no means emblematic or representative of the movement as a whole. With an emphasis on the "human," King is able to portray with a natural continuity the chronicles of an anarchist, as Joe does not "turn establishment" as he ages but rather matures and develops within his punk rock mind frame.
King's novel feels like an oral account, as if the reader is along with Chris, Dave, and Smiles to hear Joe's story. This approach certainly has its strengths and weaknesses. On the one hand, it allows a more intimate and first hand understanding of life in Slough as seen through the main character's eyes, and multi-page stream of consciousness passages give a sense of immediacy to the events describe.
Unfortunately, these same stream of consciousness passages are sometimes difficult to follow from leap to quantum leap, and occasionally the chronology of events discussed in flashback are difficult to place.
American readers will find an added obstacle in deciphering the numerous Anglicanisms, which when added to 1970s punk jargon can make Human Punk read a bit like A Clockwork Orange. This challenge can be surmounted relatively easily by paying attention to context, but remains somewhat distracting.
John King's Human Punk provides a valuable snapshot of a particular cultural phenomenon at a particular moment in time. Joe's experiences blend youthful aggression with ageless compassion, fortified by a raw honesty that would make his punk idols spit with pride. The book is rough, at times sloppy, and may very well be distasteful to upstanding members of society. Just as it should be.
>This review originally appeared in a college newspaper, back in the day.
Arcanescar
Joe Martin was a mid-teen punk in 1977, valuing the music and not the fashion unless it was a punkette in fishnets! We follow Joe and his friends through their growing pains and escapades, suffering and laughing with them as they struggle to make sense of the adult world.
Joe and his best friend, Smiles, are involved in a pivotal incident during the Queen's Jubilee year which colours the middle third of the book (set in 1988) and the final third (2000).
John King gets under the skin of his characters, making them believable. There is terrifying violence and the softest of love within these pages and the conflicting emotions are portrayed with pragmatism.
It's a book especially compelling for someone who grew up in the same era as Joe Martin. King hits so many nails on the head it's like reading your own life story.
Sennnel
Probably the most gripping book I've read. Stream-of-consciousness/narration of life as a street kid, and later as an intelligent but scarred man. Always the football fan, and has interesting taste in music, partly because some of it describes his life. His philosophy comes through his descriptions, and his thoughts are fascinating at times. I couldn't decide whether I would want to know this guy or not, but ultimately decided, you betcha. Big surprises in this book, don't read the back first!
Coidor
This book touched me. the fact that it based on alot of punk rock music really got me into the book. this is easy to read and a lovely story to read following joes life as a teenager..listening 2 punk rock and chasing after girls. a typical guy thing.
and the tragic parts really brought
tears in to my eyes.
i reccomend this to anyone whos looking for an easy to read story and interested in such music.