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eBook The Unknown Terrorist: A Novel download

by Richard Flanagan

eBook The Unknown Terrorist: A Novel download ISBN: 0802118518
Author: Richard Flanagan
Publisher: Grove Press (May 10, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 336
ePub: 1274 kb
Fb2: 1938 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mbr lit mobi doc
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary

I read Richard Flanagan's THE UNKNOWN TERRORIST after reading his incredibly moving novel THE NARROW ROAD TO THE DEEP NORTH for which the author received the Booker Prize

Ships from and sold by sweethomeliquid2. I read Richard Flanagan's THE UNKNOWN TERRORIST after reading his incredibly moving novel THE NARROW ROAD TO THE DEEP NORTH for which the author received the Booker Prize. I did not expect another novel of that quality-after all Melville only wrote one MOBY DICK-but I certainly found this one, published in the United States in 2006, a novel certainly worth my time.

Richard Flanagan did so in Gould's Book of Fish - a gloriously eccentric, unclassifiable work in which some . This is a novel about the state of a nation, and it apostrophises Australia with a rage that derives from betrayed love.

Richard Flanagan did so in Gould's Book of Fish - a gloriously eccentric, unclassifiable work in which some sketches of marine life open out into a tragicomic fable about the penal regime of colonial Tasmania. Now Flanagan has retreated to the safety of convention. The Unknown Terrorist is an exercise in genre fiction - a thriller that, I am glad to say, happens to be genuinely thrilling. A venal crew of bourgeois profiteers admires Sydney harbour from a balcony: 'Like reptiles waiting to strike, they gazed out on Australia, unable to see anything.

325 p. ; 24 cm. An innocent woman becomes a prime suspect in the investigation of a terrorist attack. I ask only once a year: please help the Internet Archive today. We’re dedicated to reader.

The Unknown Terrorist book. From the internationally acclaimed author of Gould’s Book of Fish comes an astonishing new novel, a riveting portrayal of a society driven by fear

The Unknown Terrorist book. From the internationally acclaimed author of Gould’s Book of Fish comes an astonishing new novel, a riveting portrayal of a society driven by fear. What would you do if you turned on the television and saw you were the most wanted terrorist in the country? Gina Davies is about to find out when, after a night spent with an attractive stranger, she becomes a prime suspect in From the internationally acclaimed author of Gould’s Book of Fish comes an astonishing new novel, a riveting portrayal of a society driven by fear.

Richard Flanagan was raised in Tasmania, where he still lives. He is also the author of Death of a River Guide, The Sound of One Hand Clapping, and Gould’s Book of Fish. He is married and has three children.

Wanting is a 2008 novel by Australian author Richard Flanagan. Wanting cuts between two stories based on real historical figures under the central theme of 'wanting', and is set in both nineteenth century Tasmania and Britain

Wanting is a 2008 novel by Australian author Richard Flanagan. Wanting cuts between two stories based on real historical figures under the central theme of 'wanting', and is set in both nineteenth century Tasmania and Britain. One tells the tale of an Aboriginal child, Mathinna, adopted by then governor of Van Diemen’s Land, Sir John Franklin, and his wife Lady Jane; the other of Charles Dickens’ love affair with Ellen Ternan after one of his daughters dies.

Gould’s Book of Fish. The unknown terrorist.

From the internationally acclaimed author of Gould’s Book of Fish comes an astonishing new novel, a riveting portrayal of a society driven by fear. Richard Flanagan’s previous novels, including Gould’s Book of Fish, have been some of the most acclaimed and beloved works of fiction in recent years.

From the internationally acclaimed author of Gould’s Book of Fish comes an astonishing new novel, a riveting portrayal . What would you do if you turned on the television and saw you were the most wanted terrorist in the country?

From the internationally acclaimed author of Gould’s Book of Fish comes an astonishing new novel, a riveting portrayal of a society driven by fear. What would you do if you turned on the television and saw you were the most wanted terrorist in the country? Gina Davies is about to find out when, after a night spent with an attractive stranger, she becomes a prime suspect in the investigation of an attempted terrorist attack.

From the internationally acclaimed author of Gould’s Book of Fish comes an astonishing new novel, a riveting portrayal of a society driven by fear. What would you do if you turned on the television and saw you were the most wanted terrorist in the country? Gina Davies is about to find out when, after a night spent with an attractive stranger, she becomes a prime suspect in the investigation of an attempted terrorist attack. In The Unknown Terrorist , one of the most brilliant writers working in the English language today turns his attention to the most timely of subjects — what our leaders tell us about the threats against us, and how we cope with living in fear. Chilling, impossible to put down, and all too familiar, The Unknown Terrorist is a relentless tour de force that paints a devastating picture of a contemporary society gone haywire, where the ceaseless drumbeat of terror alert levels, newsbreaks, and fear of the unknown pushes a nation ever closer to the breaking point.
Comments: (7)
Mejora
I read Richard Flanagan's THE UNKNOWN TERRORIST after reading his incredibly moving novel THE NARROW ROAD TO THE DEEP NORTH for which the author received the Booker Prize. I did not expect another novel of that quality--after all Melville only wrote one MOBY DICK--but I certainly found this one, published in the United States in 2006, a novel certainly worth my time.

Although I have read none of the other reviews, I was a bit surprised that the overall rating was three stars. I am happy to give the novel five stars. Here is why: Flanagan has created in the character of the Doll, a twenty-six-year-old pole dancer in Sydney, Australia (she tells the suits who lust after her that she is twenty-two) who is completely sympathetic. Her life just goes from one disaster to another, and everything about her is believable. She gets through one humiliating day after another as a dancer by using designer drugs and buying designer clothes and accessories. Furthermore, Mr. Flanagan gives an indictment of three important social forces in Australia that comes home certainly to the U. S., the irresponsible media ("'a little journalist is a dangerous thing'") and overzealous law enforcement and government, particularly in the area of post-9/11. The list seems to be endless of innocent people being treated as terrorists with little or no evidence in most instances (thus the title: THE UNKNOWN TERRORIST.) While I am not that familiar with events in Australia, I can give dozens of examples of the three afore-mentioned groups in the U. S. behaving badly.

Mr. Flanagan is a master at creating atmosphere. His Sydney is not the city tourists love. Beggars abound, and hotels are sleazy. You can actually feel the sweat on the Doll's and other characters' bodies because if the incessant sun, the "smoggy heat." But no sun is not much better: "The sun had gone, and the sky had dulled off to the color of a filthy pavement. Yet the lack of sun brought no relief. The cloud was a brown, prickling rug that seemed only to make the humidity and the heat even more unbearable. In another scene, the Doll finds the sky "cruel."

THE UNKNOWN TERRORIST is a dark and deeply troubling piece of fiction. All the Doll wants is some modicum of security, a decent apartment, a job she is not ashamed of, and someone to love--not a pie-in-the sky desire, it seems to me. Mr. Flanagan reminds the reader, however, that love is not enough, at least for people like the Doll but no one else in the novel has much in the way of love either. "The idea that love is not enough is a particularly painful one." I couldn't agree more. For reasons she [the Doll] does not understand, whatever it was--"life, the world, fate"--it would not let her love. Unlike Jesus and Nietzsche, who were dreamers, the Doll sees herself as a realist. "Realism is the embrace of disappointment, in order no longer to be disappointed."

In a recent interview, after receiving the Booker, Mr. Flanagan said--if I remember correctly--that love is the best example of hope. I'm holding him to that statement.
Nea
The Unknown Terrorist is a thriller with a message. Is the West doing more damage to itself than the terrorists in its actions to protect society?
The Doll, a pole dancer in Sydney is an innocent victim of a terrorist scare in Sydney. A whole range of people benefitting from the terrorist scare seek to destroy her in all ways possible. The list includes a TV journalist being sidelined, politicians who the polls are looking bad for, national security police seeking promotions and shock jocks seeking ratings. As the story progresses it becomes clear that they don’t care if she is innocent or not blood must be spilled.
Gradually they get closer and the Doll becomes more desperate as the book leads to a shattering climax. The drama takes place in Sydney, the Emerald city, sometimes brilliantly beautiful other times sleazy. As the Doll’s fortunes dim the scene moves from paradise on sunny Bondi beach to dark skies and a hailstorm in sleazy Kings Cross.
Richard Flanagan uses the technique of defamilarisation to take places in Sydney such a Pitt street and Redfern which are boringly familiar to residents like myself and give them a magical quality by his poetical like descriptions.
MeGa_NunC
First, I am not going to provide more detail than your basic plot and characters that you'd find on any review or the book jacket. With that being said, I did have higher expectations of this book based on recommendations I received about some of Flanagan's earlier novels and the topic of the novel.

The book centers on Gina Davies, a woman in her mid 20s fond of luxury clothes, shoes and purses whose life has seen its share of difficulties (which you'll find out over the course of the book). Gina works at a fairly upscale strip club in Sydney, Australia under the stage name of the Doll. Even though the Doll is full of aspiration to eventually leave this work, one almost immediately knows that she is that person we all know who no matter what they do, there will always be setbacks that prevent them from climbing out of their current situation.

The Doll goes to a Mardi Gras parade and has a chance encounter with a handsome young man, Tariq. They have a one night affair filled with sex and drugs at his apartment. When the Doll wakes up the next morning Tariq is gone and several futile calls to his cell go unanswered. As the Doll leaves the building, she sees heavy police and military presence surround the high rise. Over the next couple hours, the Doll realizes that they are after Tariq along with an unknown woman seen the previous evening in the buildings lobby with Tariq on a security tape -- yes, the Doll realizes she is this other person they are "hunting". Suddenly the news, police, ordinary individuals have assumed this woman is an "Unknown Terrorist", a co-conspirator with Tariq.

What is a terrorist? Is what we read and hear from our elected officials and news true? or always guided in the name of public interest? Are the laws being pushed through in the name of protecting us worth the freedom and liberty they may be compromising? Over the course of the book, Flanagan raises critical questions that we now face in free societies in a post- 9/11 world. While he doesn't answer the questions he raises, he forces us to ponder the impact of these issues on our lives and society.

So why a 4 rather than a 5 star? There are a few criticisms that drag down my final takeaway of this novel. Flanagan repeatedly hammers many of the issues to death throughout the book. Ultimately, I think the book could have been about 50 pages shorter and still achieved its intended affect with the same force. The middle of the book is not as strong as the beginning and the end. Finally, some of the turns in the book were a little too predictable. This troubled me since a core theme of the book was that not everything is as it has been communicated or seems to be.

Overall, "The Unknown Terrorist" is a wortwhile suspense/thriller that tackles critical post-9/11 themes in a thought provoking way. In spite of its weaknesses, it causes us to seek our own thoughts and answers to the realities we face as individuals and society in this post- 9/11 world.
Moswyn
This was such a good book, I felt invested in the Doll from the beginning. Although I had an idea what the ending would be I still had to keep reading to the end to see how it all played out. Even though set in Australia it made me think of how we are experiencing our own version of these same events in this troubled climate we’re in here in the US.