carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Memories of My Melancholy Whores

eBook Memories of My Melancholy Whores download

by Edith Grossman,Gabriel Garcia Marquez

eBook Memories of My Melancholy Whores download ISBN: 140004460X
Author: Edith Grossman,Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Publisher: Knopf; 1st edition (October 25, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 115
ePub: 1313 kb
Fb2: 1922 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mobi docx mbr doc
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary

Memories of My Melancholy Whores (Spanish: Memoria de mis putas tristes) is a novella by Gabriel García Márquez.

Memories of My Melancholy Whores (Spanish: Memoria de mis putas tristes) is a novella by Gabriel García Márquez. An old journalist, who has just celebrated his 90th birthday, seeks sex with a young prostitute, who is selling her virginity to help her family. Instead of sex, he discovers love for the first time in his life.

Gabriel Garcia Marquez was born in Aracataca, Colombia, in 1927. He studied at the University of Bogota and later worked as a reporter for the Colombian newspaper El Espectador and as a foreign correspondent in Rome, Paris, Barcelona, Caracas and New York

Gabriel Garcia Marquez was born in Aracataca, Colombia, in 1927. He studied at the University of Bogota and later worked as a reporter for the Colombian newspaper El Espectador and as a foreign correspondent in Rome, Paris, Barcelona, Caracas and New York. He is the author of several novels and collections of stories, including Eyes of a Blue Dog (1947), Leaf Storm (1955), No One Writes to the Colonel (1958), In Evil Hour (1962), Big Mama's Funeral (1962), One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967), Innocent Erendira and Other Stories (1972)

Gabriel Garcia Marquez in his MEMORIES OF MY MELANCHOLY WHORES doesn't rush. The book is a seduction and moves at that quiet lazy confident pace.

Gabriel Garcia Marquez in his MEMORIES OF MY MELANCHOLY WHORES doesn't rush. The protagonist turns 90 and, mindful of his mortality, wants what he's never had: "A night of wild love with an adolescent virgin. Memory, though, is an admission of loss. Desire is our strategy to reclaim what was lost. and that's part of the joy of this book, as the "Professor," defies death less through contact with flesh, than though memory and desire. In this book as in life, it is the approach, it is anticipation, that sets us on fire. Desire is our straegy to reclaim what was lost.

Marquez Gabriel Garcia. Gabriel Garcia Marquez Memories of my Melancholy Whores He was not to do anything in bad taste, the woman of the inn warned old Eguchi

Marquez Gabriel Garcia. Gabriel Garcia Marquez Memories of my Melancholy Whores He was not to do anything in bad taste, the woman of the inn warned old Eguchi. He was not to put his finger into the mouth of the sleeping girl, or try anything else of that sort. YASUNARI KAWABATA, House of the Sleeping Beauties 1 The year I turned ninety, I wanted to give myself the gift of a night of wild love with an adolescen. He was not to do anything in bad taste, the woman of the inn warned old Eguchi.

Alberto Manguel finds little of substance in Gabriel García Márquez's wan novella Memories of My Melancholy Whores. Shortly before his 90th birthday, the anonymous hero of Gabriel García Márquez's new novella, a columnist for a smalltown newspaper, decides to offer himself "the gift of a night of wild love with an adolescent virgin". A life-long customer of the town's brothels, he has virtuously never yet availed himself of the "new" whores on offer. But "morality", as Rosa, the brothel-keeper, observes, "is a question of time", and now the old man believes he deserves such a gift.

By Gabriel García Márquez. 115 pp. Alfred A. Knopf. And the central codger of "Memories of My Melancholy Whores" seems, at least at the outset, a very dirty old man indeed. The story begins, with García Márquez's characteristic ng conciseness, like this: "The year I turned 90, I wanted to give myself the gift of a night of wild love with an adolescent virgin.

Tender, knowing, and slyly comic, Memories of My Melancholy Whores is an exquisite addition to the master’s work.

Part of Vintage International. Tender, knowing, and slyly comic, Memories of My Melancholy Whores is an exquisite addition to the master’s work. About Memories of My Melancholy Whores. As is his habit–he has purchased hundreds of women–he asks a madam for her assistance.

The Fragrance of Guava is a book based on the long conversations between Gabriel García Márquez and his close friend Plinio Apuleyo Mendoza. Published in 1982, the book describes the life of García Márquez, from his early childhood to his encounters with celebrities.

Memories of My Melancholy Whores. Memories of My Melancholy Whores was published in 2004. The novel tells the story, in the first person, of an old man and a teenage crush, similar to Maria dos Prazeres in Strange Pilgrims

Memories of My Melancholy Whores. The novel tells the story, in the first person, of an old man and a teenage crush, similar to Maria dos Prazeres in Strange Pilgrims. The protagonist finds love near the end of his life, when the only adventure left is death.

Memories of My Melancholy Whores is Gabriel García Márquez’s first work of fiction in ten years, written at the height of his powers, the Spanish edition of which Ilan Stavans called, “Masterful. Erotic. As hypnotizing as it is disturbing” (Los Angeles Times).On the eve of his ninetieth birthday, our unnamed protagonist–an undistinguished journalist and lifelong bachelor–decides to give himself “the gift of a night of wild love with an adolescent virgin.”The virgin, whom an old madam procures for him, is splendidly young, with the silent power of a sleeping beauty. The night of love blossoms into a transforming year. It is a year in which he relives, in a rush of memories, his lifetime of (paid-for) sexual adventures and experiences a revelation that brings him to the edge of dying–not of old age, but, at long last, of uncorrupted love. Memories of My Melancholy Whores is a brilliant gem by the master storyteller.
Comments: (7)
Saithinin
This charming little novel is considered a minor work by the Nobel Prize winning Columbian author Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Whatever its literary status, it's a worthwhile read. The frame of the story involves a ninety year old man who falls in love with a young prostitute, who's not really a prostitute. Within that framework, the author works in some wonderful insights into aging, love, friendship and death. The prose flows through the book like a quiet river on a summer day and provides the reader with a gentle reflective tale by one of the 20th century's greatest writers.
Snowseeker
What an unusual story. It's difficult to describe this book without spoiling the experience for those who have not yet read it. Still I can say that any lover of books and great narratives will find this novel an incredibly fascinating account. The way he Marquez circulates around a social taboo and keeps the reader in suspense is just marvellous and very elegantly done. Enjoy but have an open mind.
Burking
Gabriel García Márquez died last month so I looked for a book I hadn't read. "Memories" proved an excellent choice. His language is rich, voluptuous and humid as the Colombian jungle. His 90 year old narrator is fully alive and describes a world where teenage girls are facilitated into prostitution and an omnipresent government censor peers over the narrator's work at the newspaper—and makes it all appear totally natural.

The physical book looks and feels like it came from a different era, a slim volume with a textured cover, off-white pages and archaic Janson typeface.

And we English speakers should offer special thanks to Edith Grossman, García Márquez's superstar translator.
Maldarbaq
Really loved this novella. It was a deep dive into the mind of an old man who regardless of all that he did and was still had love and still wanted to be loved. It's a quick and enjoyable read that'll make you ruminate on mortality and maybe some other off color topics.
Skilkancar
Márquez is a member of the upper echelon of serious writers; have you read many books better than 100 Years of Solitude? Nonetheless, sometimes you may not be up for a 200 character, 10 generation epic. No? This 115 page gem is like the Splenda version of Márquez, all the flavor, easier to handle.

On the eve of his 90th birthday, a lifelong bachelor, utterly alone in the decaying house of his long dead parents, connected to the world only by the Sunday column he is still allowed to write for the local newspaper, feels the strong need for one more adventure; a wild night with a young virgin. After some trouble, it is arranged but presented with the peaceful sleep of the girl that has been carefully selected for him, he merely watches her and thus begins to grow the love that in his 90 years he has never known. Though his meager finances can barely afford it, the need to see her grows, as does his love for her, exponentially. Like a teenager in love for the first time, he can't sleep, loses weight, can only think of their next meeting when he'll be able so see her sleep, her body providing answers to the questions he thinks but doesn't vocalize. This impossible, but vital love affair sustains him for another year and through it the twists and turns of love makes him see what he never did; at the age of 90 he becomes a new man, love opening his eyes before they close forever.

Some quotes:

"I have never gone to bed with a woman I didn't pay, and the few who weren't in the profession I persuaded, by argument or by force, to take money even if they threw it in the trash. When I was twenty I began to keep a record listing name, age, place and a brief notation on the circumstances and style of lovemaking. By the time I was fifty there were 514 women with whom I had been at least once. I stopped making the list when my body no longer allowed me to have so many and I could keep track of them without paper. I had my own ethics. I never took part in orgies or in public encounters, and I did not share secrets or recount an adventure of the body or the soul, because from the time I was young I realized that none goes unpunished."

"The secretaries presented me with three pairs of silk undershorts printed with kisses, and a card in which they offered to remove them for me. It occurred to me that among the charms of old age are the provocations our young female friends permit themselves because they think we are out of commission."

"For a week I did not take off my mechanic's coverall, day or night, I did not bathe or shave or brush my teeth, because love taught me too late that you groom yourself for someone, and I'd never had anyone to do that for."

"The truth is I'm getting old, I said. We already are old, she said with a sigh. What happens is that you don't feel it on the inside, but from the outside everybody can see it."
Buriwield
In the US, we understand sexy but we struggle with the erotic. We read the body like we read the newspaper, by habit; with a glance. Our real failure in love is our failure to take our time. It's not in our nature to wait, to sample, to savor. We rush into love as if we were late to an appointment. Gabriel Garcia Marquez in his MEMORIES OF MY MELANCHOLY WHORES doesn't rush. The book is a seduction and moves at that quiet lazy confident pace. The protagonist turns 90 and, mindful of his mortality, wants what he's never had: "A night of wild love with an adolescent virgin." Of course, desire is a dream and dreams are an attempt to remember. And, what do we want to remember, everything, everyone we've ever loved. Memory, though, is an admission of loss. Desire is our straegy to reclaim what was lost. Of course, memory is a trickster...and that's part of the joy of this book, as the "Professor," defies death less through contact with flesh, than though memory and desire. In this book as in life, it is the approach, it is anticipation, that sets us on fire.