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eBook Susan Lenox: Her Fall and Rise download

by David Graham Phillips

eBook Susan Lenox: Her Fall and Rise download ISBN: 0839815689
Author: David Graham Phillips
Publisher: Irvington Pub (June 1, 1917)
Language: English
ePub: 1551 kb
Fb2: 1644 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: rtf azw txt lit
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary

Susan Lenox (Her Fall and Rise) is a 1931 American pre-Code film directed and produced by Robert Z. Leonard and starring Greta Garbo and Clark Gable. The film was based on the novel by David Graham Phillips and made by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

Susan Lenox (Her Fall and Rise) is a 1931 American pre-Code film directed and produced by Robert Z. The film was based on the novel by David Graham Phillips and made by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. It was the only film in which Greta Garbo was paired with Clark Gable. However, they didn't like each other. The notoriety of the novel alone was enough for British censors to ban it from release.

This text is in the PUBLIC DOMAIN. Susan lenox: her rise and fall. by David Graham Phillips. Printed in the United States of America. David graham phillips a tribute. Volume I. With a portrait of the author. D. appleton and company new york london 1917. Even now I cannot realize that he is dead, and often in the city streets-on Fifth Avenue in particular-I find myself glancing ahead for a glimpse of the tall, boyish, familiar. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63.

The book is somewhat flawed by Phillips' constant preaching against conventional morality, his flawed observations on the human condition and so forth. Phillips seems to think he's the only smart person in the room and that those not subscribing to his points of view are delusional fools. It's not uncommon to find jerks within the pages of literature, but one doesn't generally discover that the real jerk in the pages is the author himself. Still, it was an interesting take on the times, times which in some ways aren't all that different from our own.

by David Graham Phillips. David graham phillips. appleton and company new york london. Even now I cannot realize that he is dead, and often in the city streets on Fifth Avenue in particular I find myself glancing ahead for a glimpse of the tall, boyish, familiar figure experience once again a flash of the old happy expectancy. I have lived in many lands, and have known men. I never knew a finer man than Graham Phillips. His were the clearest, bluest, most honest eyes I ever saw eyes that scorned untruth eyes that penetrated all sham.

Download David Graham Phillips's SUSAN LENOX: HER FALL AND RISE for your kindle, tablet, IPAD, PC or mobile. David Graham Phillips

Download David Graham Phillips's SUSAN LENOX: HER FALL AND RISE for your kindle, tablet, IPAD, PC or mobile. David Graham Phillips's SUSAN LENOX: HER FALL AND RISE for your kindle, tablet, IPAD, PC or mobile. Download the SUSAN LENOX: HER FALL AND RISE ebook free.

Susan lenox: her fall and rise. Section 5. General Information About Project Gutenberg-tm electronic works. The Grain of Dust: A Novel. The Second Generation. The Hungry Heart A Novel. Light-Fingered Gentry.

Phillips seems to think he's the only smart person in the room and that those not subscribing to his points of view are delusional fools.

Comments: (7)
Steel_Blade
Written in the early 20th century and in the style you'd expect from an accomplished newspaperman ... very well done and ahead of its time. Not for everyone, but a serious student of American fiction would do well to read it. Phillips's writing eventually got him killed by a delusional socialite who thought Phillips had written about and besmirched the reputation of his sister. The murder led to the first weapons registry in the USA known as the "Sullivan Law" .

Read more of David Graham Phillips' books for a rich dive into the world of muckrakers who exposed the seamy side of early 20th century America.
Amarin
I'm hard pressed to figure out how to rate this book, in some ways, it's quite good, in others, rather tedious. So, it's partly 4*s, which in my grading means quite good, and partly 3*s, which more means, OK. I wish one could give +s and -s with the * rating. If so, then it would be either a ***+, or perhaps a ****-.

This book, which was published posthumously, would have been much improved by some serious editing, as the author goes on a bit much. The story itself is interesting and keeps one's attention pretty well. The social attitudes that drive the story would no longer hold sway today. I could be wrong, of course, but I doubt very many people today would think that the mere fact of one's having been born out of wedlock automatically means that one is morally tainted (after all, some 40% of American children are born out of wedlock in the 21st century). Yet that is the situation with Susan Lennox (at the beginning of the 20th century). Everyone around her pretty much assumed she had the moral inclinations towards the gutter merely because of the situation of her birth. She doesn't see it that way, however, so strives through a series of trials, towards total independence. She wanted to be her own mistress, so to speak, not the kept woman, either as spouse, mistress, or one-night stand of men.

The book is somewhat flawed by Phillips' constant preaching against conventional morality, his flawed observations on the human condition, and so forth. Phillips seems to think he's the only smart person in the room and that those not subscribing to his points of view are delusional fools. It's not uncommon to find jerks within the pages of literature, but one doesn't generally discover that the real jerk in the pages is the author himself. It's also telling that Phillips talks about treating women and men similarly, as merely "people", but then he obsesses interminably, to the point of perversion, on Susan's perfection of foot and ankle, and her grey-violet eyes.

Still, it was an interesting take on the times, times which in some ways aren't all that different from our own. The plutocrats are still fleecing the rest of us for their personal benefit. The church is still not practicing what it preaches. We tend to be rather quick to make moral judgments on people who are merely victims of life's circumstances.

One recurring theme in the book was that single women could not make their way in the world without the assistance of a man (husband, father, lover), which is to say, women could not make anything of themselves on their own. I find this idea particularly interesting because this book came out about the time my grandmother became a young widow with a small child (the book was written in 1912, although not published until 1917; I believe my grandmother was widowed in 1913, but I could be off a year one way or the other), and she seems to have made her way rather well. Perhaps it's because a couple of her brothers loaned her some money for schooling (she became a chiropractor) and housing (she had a decent-sized house in Wichita where she saw her patients and also rented out three small apartments), loans she paid back, or perhaps Phillips had so little experience that he never met strong, independent women like my grandmother (or her sister, Anna, who also made her own way). Phillips admired the concept of strong, independent women, that's the theme of the book after all, but he seems to have made a lot of sh** up because he didn't really know what he was talking about half the time. In the end, Susan became an independent woman, not on her own merit, but because a man set her up. WTF? Did I already mention that the book proved <em>him</em> to be a first-class a-hole?

Whatever, for all its flaws, it's a pretty interesting book to have read.
Musical Aura Island
good book
Jugami
This was the most tedious story I've read in a very long while. I rarely begin a book and not finish it but after getting more than half way through this one I just couldn't continue. The story is bogged down in so much mindnumbing, repetitive detail, detail that adds nothing to the story except to make it unbelievably tiresome. The main character, Susan Lenox, makes the same ridiculous decisions over and over again with the same disastrous results. I found this story to be very unsatisfactory. I gave this story one star because I had no other choice, I couldn't give it no stars.
invincible
I was indeed impressed with this lady's moxy and self reliance. However, I was somewhat disappointed in the book as a whole. There was enough movement in the first half of the book to keep me reading, but the over descript pros made me weary. After a while I began to simply skim over the pages trying to find content. The story was powerful, but could have been told in one-forth of the pages.
Asyasya
I read this book at least five years ago, if not longer, and the impression is still with me. We meet Susan as a young lady in a small, closed minded town in the "Western" state of Ohio, just past the turn of the century. (the last century.) She believes a young man that he has fallen in love with her and will run away with her to marry. This was viewed as a terrible scandal by the petty members of the community, "forcing" her guardians to find a farmer for her to marry; a dreadful creature. This is the beginning of her fall, and she falls and falls for some number of years following. She ecapes to a city- was in New York? and makes her way as a well brought up young woman forced to do so in a man's world. Men were essential to women for their livlihood, and a woman without reputation and introduction were cast adrift with dreadful housing, horrible food, terrible job prospects, if they can even be called a job. The gap between rich and poor was tremendous even then, and literally pennies were all that were needed to improve the lot of the "working poor", just as is the case now. The lot of the workers was easily improved, and it was tragic to see how callous the manufacturers were to the needs of their laborors.
Susan, luckily, "rises" but has a talent and ability to develop it that so few have. That she had the opportunity at all was mere chance.