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eBook Brood of the Witch-Queen download

by Sax Rohmer

eBook Brood of the Witch-Queen download ISBN: 1438525753
Author: Sax Rohmer
Publisher: Book Jungle (October 8, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 190
ePub: 1870 kb
Fb2: 1614 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: azw rtf lrf rtf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary

Brood of the Witch Queen is a 1918 supernatural novel by Arthur Henry Sarsfield Ward, known better under his pseudonym, Sax Rohmer.

Brood of the Witch Queen is a 1918 supernatural novel by Arthur Henry Sarsfield Ward, known better under his pseudonym, Sax Rohmer. The story deals with Robert Cairn and his suspicions of Antony Ferrara, the adopted son of an old friend and colleague of Robert's father, Dr Bruce Cairn, of infernal magic and supernatural influence. The novel begins with the strange murder of Sir Michael Ferrara.

Sax Rohmer was born in Birmingham, Warwickshire. At the age of 18, he adopted the name Sarsfield, the name of a famous Irish general admired by Rohmer's mother. He married Rose Elizabeth Knox in 1909 and, at his wife's insistence, began using the name Sax Rohmer for his fiction, eventually employing the pseudonym as his actual name. Rohmer was basically a self-taught scholar. He started writing as a journalist; his beat was the Limehouse underworld in London

Brood of the Witch-Queen book. Sax Rohmer is most famous for creating the diabolical Fu Manchu, but he was also a writer of weird and asupernatural tales

Brood of the Witch-Queen book. Sax Rohmer is most famous for creating the diabolical Fu Manchu, but he was also a writer of weird and asupernatural tales. This book presents 12 of his wierd fictions and the full-length novel of Egyptian horror, Brood of the Witch-Queen. All of the weird tales collected here are pulpy, intriguing, horrifying, and very readable. His protagonists spend a lot of their time determining natural causes for the "magical" happenings in the stories-almost as if he's trying to debunk all the weirdness.

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Romer's "Brood of the Witch-Queen" is set around World War I in post- Victorian England; most of the action is in. .I read this book many years ago, as well as other books by Sax Rohmer.

Romer's "Brood of the Witch-Queen" is set around World War I in post- Victorian England; most of the action is in England with some action taking place in Egypt. Rohmer's "Dr. Fu Manchu" books,away", are about an elusive arch-criminal who always "gets away" and thwarts the authorities to carry on his dastardly deeds another day in another adventure.

I will say though that Dr Joshi's introduction could have made more of the weird nature of Rohmer's best known work, the Fu Manchu series. Reading that was the reason I bought this, and by volume 8 in that collection we have eternal life, mind control, telepathy, worm-men, and stuff either horror, or sci-fi, or both.

An art deco tale of Egyptian sorcery written by the creator of Fu Manchu, Sax Rohmer. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

Sax Rohmer was the pseudonym used by Arthur Henry Sarsfield Ward. Ward was a British novelist born in 1883. He is most remembered for his series of novels featuring the master criminal Dr Fu Manchu. Other works include: The Sins of Severac Bablon (1914), The Yellow Claw (1915), The Devil Doctor (1916), The Hand of Fu-Manchu (1917), Brood of the Witch-Queen (1918), Dope (1919) and Bat Wing (1921). This story begins with this note. "The strange deeds of Antony Ferrara, as herein related, are intended to illustrate certain phases of Sorcery as it was formerly practiced (according to numerous records) not only in Ancient Egypt but also in Europe, during the Middle Ages. In no case do the powers attributed to him exceed those which are claimed for a fully equipped Adept."
Comments: (7)
Zulkishicage
Although not the best of Sax Romer's novels, it certainly is one of the creepier and scarier of his works. Certainly it is a wonderful book for that cold, dark autumn night while sitting by the fireplace. Romer's "Brood of the Witch-Queen" is set around World War I in post- Victorian England; most of the action is in England with some action taking place in Egypt. I especially enjoyed the blending of science and the supernatural with spiders and other bugs, haunting smells and glowing lights, and actually some vampires and even mummies! The use of ancient Egyptian magic (everything Egypt was very popular at this time) along with the Egyptian pyramid adventure along with spiders and some very serious creepy crawly bugs added to the atmosphere. I struggled with a 3 or a 4 on this one as I really like it; however, I was a bit let down by the ending, but I still gave it a 4. I enjoyed it from its strong, sinister start to the weaker finish.

It begins on a sinister note as Robert Cairn sees Apollo, the king of the swans, who seems to have died without apparent reason right in front of his eyes! When Robert goes to investigate, he discovers that the swan had its neck broken in three places. He goes to the nearest home, the one of Antony Ferrara. Ferrara has always been a strange and mysterious person; he is the "son" of a man who is good friends with Robert's father. While in Ferrara's home, Robert sees and smells some strange things; he glimpses numerous Egyptian artifacts and the strangest of all, an unwrapped mummy. Just who is this Ferrara? The answer to that question while take you through this delightful, almost 100 year old book!
Granigrinn
My dad had a copy of this in his library when I was a teen. He was a big fan of Conan Doyle, Lovecraft, and the Egyptian book of the Dead. I was a big fan of Bram Stoker and Montague Summers vampire lore. I loved reading this again after 45 years, and it was good choice for the first full length book I downloaded to my kindle. A fun and scarey read that's hard to put down if you're into this sort of thing. Beautifully crafted and easy to pick up. The only reason I gave it four stars instead of five is because of the abrupt ending. I would have liked a little more closure, on the other hand, how many real horror stories have happy endings? Highly recommended.
Frostdefender
In a lot of ways, this book is a throwback to another era. The damsels in distress, the robust and portly good guys, booze and tobacco for strength, and all of the crusty conventions are here. If a movie, at times this one feels like it would star Vincent Price late at night, or on a Saturday afternoon. Underneath the crust of stale conventions, though, beats a heart of originality. For good stretches, the book feels like "The Mummy" movies, and in other stretches like Indiana Jones. Quite a lot of it feels like a Sherlock Holmes story. Sometimes it's a reminder about Dracula movies as well. However, Harry Potter seems to me to be the most apt comparison. The heros, while apparently physicians or reporters, are in reality practitioners of White Magic to defend against the villain. In addition, there's an underlying knowledge of Hermetic philosophy on display here at times - sadly emerging from the villian's mouth in its most complete form. Now, that's really interesting. This book in fact seems to reflect several concepts from the early 20th century that had a big impact - including the importance of "Will," vibrations, and other concepts. Possibly, this book could have been something really cool. The early-20th-century British writing can be pretty stiff. Still, it's interesting historically, and is a page-turner.
Deodorant for your language
I read this book many years ago, as well as other books by Sax Rohmer. Rohmer's "Dr. Fu Manchu" books,away", are about an elusive arch-criminal who always "gets away" and thwarts the authorities to carry on his dastardly deeds another day in another adventure. I read and enjoyed the Fu Manchu series, as well as Rohmer's other offerings of the mysterious and occult. I have actually read many of them more than once. Mr. Rohmer's works are addicting, if the reader enjoys the occult. Although written in the early 20th century, Mr. Rohmer's tales are ageless and full of suspense. I have always been a great fan.
LeXXXuS
Generally, I prefer tales that have some sense of reality to them, this story does not. This is a tale of witchcraft, sorcery, and the supernatural that in the hands of many writers might seem almost like a fairy tale. In the hands of Sax Rohmer it is a masterpiece of suspenseful, chilling, supernatural occurrences, with a bold dash of adventure and drama mixed in. The story is fast paced, sustains an air of suspense, and an almost palpable feeling of eeriness about it. As I have stated in other reviews of his works, Sax Rohmer was a master story teller. One thing for sure, he is never boring. With Brood of the Witch Queen he blends action, adventure, and suspense into a carefully crafted whole that is easy to follow, and downright wicked fun to read. I rather enjoyed the air of guilty pleasure I had reading it. Unlike in his Fu Manchu stories, Rohmer takes the time to flesh out his characters for this story, adding some additional depth that those works do not possess. Other reviewers have stated that this is his best work, I tend to agree.

For free on Kindle. This one is definitely worth your time.