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eBook The Magician download

by W. Somerset Maugham

eBook The Magician download ISBN: 0434456217
Author: W. Somerset Maugham
Publisher: Doran; Second Edition edition (1956)
Language: English
Pages: 233
ePub: 1215 kb
Fb2: 1666 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: docx mbr azw lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary

His other works include travel books, essays, criticism and the autobiographical The Summing Up and A Writer's Notebook

William Somerset Maugham was born in 1874 and lived in Paris until he was ten. He was educated at King's School, Canterbury, and at Heidelberg University. He spent some time at St. Thomas' Hospital with the idea of practising medicine, but the success of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth, published in 1897, won him over to letters. His other works include travel books, essays, criticism and the autobiographical The Summing Up and A Writer's Notebook. In 1927 Somerset Maugham settled in the South of France and lived there until his death in 1965. Other works by w. somerset maugham.

Will, love, and imagination are magic powers that everyone possesses; and whoever knows how to develop them to their fullest extent is a magician

Will, love, and imagination are magic powers that everyone possesses; and whoever knows how to develop them to their fullest extent is a magician. Magic has but one dogma, namely, that the seen is the measure of the unseen. Will you tell us what the powers are that the adept possesses?'

The Magician is a novel by British author W. Somerset Maugham, originally published in 1908. In this tale, the magician Oliver Haddo, a caricature of Aleister Crowley, attempts to create life. Crowley wrote a critique of this book under the pen name.

The Magician is a novel by British author W. Crowley wrote a critique of this book under the pen name Oliver Haddo, in which he accused Maugham of plagiarism. Maugham wrote The Magician in London, after he had spent some time living in Paris, where he met Aleister Crowley

Maugham’s enchanting tale of secrets and fatal attraction The Magician is one of Somerset Maugham’s most complex and perceptive novels.

Maugham’s enchanting tale of secrets and fatal attraction The Magician is one of Somerset Maugham’s most complex and perceptive novels. Running through it is the theme of evil, deftly woven into a story as memorable for its action as for its astonishingly vivid set of characters. In fin de siecle Paris, Arthur and Margaret are engaged to be married.

Susie describing Oliver Haddo) This is, surprisingly from Maugham, a horror story In the introduction to The Magician which Maugham wrote years later, he freely admits to basing the character of Haddo on the notorious black magician, writer, poet.

Susie describing Oliver Haddo) This is, surprisingly from Maugham, a horror story. The set-up The book begins as a fairly run-of-the-mill love story. Young English surgeon Arthur Burdon knew Margaret Dauncey's parents. In the introduction to The Magician which Maugham wrote years later, he freely admits to basing the character of Haddo on the notorious black magician, writer, poet and self-publicist Aleister Crowley, who he met in Paris in the early-1900s, when Maugham was living with the painter Gerald Kelly. In fact not only Haddo-Crowley but many of the other characters and settings are borrowed directly from life. Margaret’s studio is modelled on Kelly’s.

W Somerset William Somerset Maugham. You may find it for free on the web. Crowley wrote a critique of this book under the pen name Oliver Haddo, where he accused Maugham of plagiarism. Maugham wrote The Magician in London, after he had spent some time living in Paris, where he met Aleister Crowley. The novel was later republished with a foreword by Maugham entitled "A Fragment of Autobiography".

The Painted Veil by W. a very interesting book - definitely makes you do some thinking. not a typical love story.Set in England and Hong Kong in the 1920s, The Painted Veil is the story of the beautiful but love-starved Kitty Fane. When her husband discovers her adulterous affair, he forces her to accompany him to the heart of a cholera epidemic. Thank you for the upload. Нравится Показать список оценивших.

Arthur Burdon and Dr Porho¿t walked in silence. They had lunched at a restaurant in the Boulevard Saint Michel, and were sauntering now in the gardens of the Luxembourg. Dr Porho¿t walked with stooping shoulders, his hands behind him. He beheld the scene with the eyes of the many painters who have sought by means of the most charming garden in Paris to express their sense of beauty.
Comments: (7)
Prinna
Maugham's elegant prose, his mastery of dialog, and his uncanny ability to sketch living, breathing, three dimensional characters in a few sentences serve him well in this gripping tale of the life and crimes of the evil Oliver Haddo and the handful of unlucky naïfs who fall under his spell in Paris at the turn of the last century.
Unlike many of Maugham's other novels, the appeal of "The Magician" owes as much to the tight plotting as to the characterizations. In particular, the character of the deliciously wicked Oliver Haddo, based on the infamous Aleister Crowley, "the wickedest man alive," jumps off the page. However, like Bram Stoker's "Dracula" (a book that in structure "The Magician" resembles more than a little) the plot can sag slightly when the villain is off-stage. Luckily, this is never for more than a handful of pages.
Still surprisingly fresh and readable nearly a hundred years after its first publication, this book will appeal as much to the literate horror fan as to the typical "Twentieth Century Classics" reader.
mr.Mine
This is a horror novel. I was surprised Maughm dabbled in the occult. It is a mix of Mary Shelly, Wilkie Collins and Conan Doyle. The first part is literary, while the latter part is plot-driven. I believe or son Welles was fascinated by the character of Haddo.
Negal
forget this hasty knock off..
Fomand
Boring to me.
Cobandis
This is one of Maugham's least-read works, judging from its absence in most bookstores and libraries. Of Human Bondage, Cakes and Ale, The Moon and Sixpence are usually fairly easy to locate on most shelves. You must do a little digging to find this one, but it will reward your efforts.
At the center of the book is Oliver Haddo, who, as you can tell from the other reviews here, is based entirely and without much thought of disguise upon Aleister Crowley, the London necromancer. The plot is indeed pure melodrama, the virginal fiance drawn irresistibly towards her doom by dark forces against which there appears to be no defense. Think of Bram Stoker, or Coppola if you haven't read the novel. Will our hero somehow find a way to overcome the great odds and emerge victorious? Will Haddo succeed in his plan of evil debauchery? Stay tuned for the heady conclusion.
What saves The Magician from sinking into the morass of its conventional and even hackneyed plot is the quality of Maugham's writing. We are aware at all times that we are in the hands of an accomplished writer and artist, who can turn a tired theme into an event of wit and real pathos. At times the scenes are in fact quite chillingly rendered as well. There is real suspense here, as well as some startlingly weird and realistic depictions of the occult. The scene that comes most readily to mind is Haddo's creation of the homonculi, some home-grown little fiends he cooks up in a test-tube. Many of the scenes have a surreal edge to them, but are grounded in enough realistic detail to lend them plausibility at the same time.
I would recommend this book to those who have read and enjoyed Maugham's other works, as well as to anyone who enjoys books about the occult or to fans of horror novels (of which there are legion). It's an easy and fun read and is frightening enough that it just might have you looking over your shoulder the next time you're dining in a London restaurant, double-checking to see if Haddo might not be sitting somewhere across the room. Then again, these days, a lot of women probably hope that he is.
Risa
Dear readers, I just wanted to point out that the Bruin Books version of THE MAGICIAN, an early horror novel by W. Somerset Maugham, also includes many of Maugham's best short stories dealing with the Strange and Supernatural. The novel is great fun, but the stories are superb and provide clear evidence why W. Somerset Maugham is considered one of the most important writers of the Twentieth Century. This is the first time that nearly all of Maugham's weird fiction has been collected in a single volume. Great stuff!
Shak
This novel is based on a character whom Somerset Maugham met in Paris in 1897 called Aleistair Crowley. He was a liar, a boastful man and a voluminous writer of mediocre verse. He was also dabbing in Satanism, magic and occult. He inspired Somerset Maugham and served as a model for Oliver Haddo in "The Magician".
Arthur Burdon, surgeon of St Luke's in London, has just arrived in Paris to study the methods of the French operators. But he has also come there to see Margaret Dauncy with whom he is in love. It is Dr Porhoet, a lifetime friend of Arthur's, who introduces him to Oliver Haddo. This obese, fleshy-faced man with an imposing paunch claims to be a magician. At a dinner party, the guests can hardly believe the stories told by this charlatan. They wonder whether he is an impostor or a madman and how much he really believes what he says. Does he deceive himself or is he laughing up his sleeve at the madness of those who take him seriously? To Arthur's bewilderment, as he is about to marry Margaret, she falls under the spell of Oliver Haddo and flees with him. Yet Arthur can hardly picture into what abyss of horror and evil Margaret will be driven.
A complex and perceptive novel. The theme of evil is perfectly woven into a story stunning for its action and vivid characters.
I recommend the audio version from Audible.com. Listening to Frederick Davidson reading "The Magician" is a pure delight!