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eBook King of the Khyber Rifles download

by Talbot Mundy

eBook King of the Khyber Rifles download ISBN: 143850750X
Author: Talbot Mundy
Publisher: Book Jungle (December 15, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 280
ePub: 1611 kb
Fb2: 1258 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mbr doc rtf lit
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary

Athelstan King, for instance, nothing yet but a captain unattached, satin meagerly furnished quarters with his heels on a table.

Athelstan King, for instance, nothing yet but a captain unattached, satin meagerly furnished quarters with his heels on a table. He is not adoctor, yet he read a book on surgery, and when he went over to the clubhe carried the book under his arm and continued to read it there. He isconsidered a rotten conversationalist, and he did nothing at the club toimprove his reputation. Man alive-get a move on!" gasped a wondering senior, accepting acigar. Nobody knows where he gets those long, strong, black cheroots,and nobody ever refuses one.

King of the Khyber Rifles is a 1953 adventure film directed by Henry King and starring Tyrone Power and Terry Moore. This novel was also the basis for John Ford's The Black Watch (1929). The Khyber Pass scenes were shot in the Alabama Hills, Lone Pine, California. Released by 20th Century Fox, the film was one of the first shot in Technicolor CinemaScope.

Son of the Indian Secret Service. Heavily influenced both by Mundy's own unsuccessful career in India and by his interest in theosophy, it describes his adventures among the (mostly Muslim) tribes of the north with the mystical woman adventuress Yasmini and the Turkish mullah Muhammed Anim. Like Greenmantle by John Buchan, also first published in 1916, it deals with the possibility that Turkey might try to stir Muslims into a jihad against the British Empire.

LibriVox recording of King of the Kyber Rifles, by Talbot Mindy For more free audio books or to become a volunteer reader, visit LibriVox. Download M4B (274MB).

LibriVox recording of King of the Kyber Rifles, by Talbot Mindy. Read by Brett W. Downey  . For more free audio books or to become a volunteer reader, visit LibriVox.

The author, Talbot Mundy, wrote this in the period of the Pulps. Then by all means read King of the Khyber Rifles. It will show the high adventure of the Pulp Era of story telling. This is shown by the long passages, which are characteristic of writing from this period. If you are a fan of the Robert Howard non-Conan stories, which are set in a more modern era or a fan Kipling and his stories of India.

Talbot Mundy (born William Lancaster Gribbon) was an English-born American . See if your friends have read any of Talbot Mundy's books. Best known as the author of King of the Khyber Rifles and the Jimgrim series, much of his work was published in pulp magazines.

Talbot Mundy (born William Lancaster Gribbon) was an English-born American writer of adventure fiction. Talbot Mundy’s books. King of the Khyber Rifles.

Download M4B (274MB). He is attached to the Khyber Rifles regiment as a cover, but his real job is to prevent a holy war. Download cover art Download CD case insert. Talbot MUNDY (1879 - 1940).

Athelstan King is a British Secret Agent stationed in India at the beginning of WWI. "To stop a holy war single-handed would be rather like stopping the wind-possibly easy enough, if one knew the wa. Can King afford to trust her? Can he afford not to? (Introduction by Brett W. Downey).

Then, in 1953 King of the Khyber Rifles, starring Tyrone Power, was one of the first CinemaScope spectaculars.

Khyber-mouth is haunted after dark by the men whose blood-feuds are too reeking raw to let them dare go home and for whom the British hangman very likely waits a mile or two farther south. King stains his face dark brown, and disguises himself as a native hakim, or medicine man. His name is Kurrum Khan. Then, in 1953 King of the Khyber Rifles, starring Tyrone Power, was one of the first CinemaScope spectaculars.

Talbot Mundy was an early 20th century English writer who often wrote under the pseudonym Walter Galt. At age 19 he left London to travel to India and parts of the Near and Far East. Most of Mundy's novels are set in India under British Occupation in which the loyal British officers encounter ancient Indian mysticism. In the 1920's Mundy wrote stories about Tros of Samothrace, a Greek freedom fighter who aided Britons and Druids in their fight against Julius Caesar. King of the Khyber Rifles is an action packed adventure story full of sword fights, intrigue, exotic romance and strong dangerous men. A British officer is involved in the 'mysticism' of then-forbidden Tibet. The hero must save India from a foreign invasion being plotted in the Khinjan Caves beyond the Khyber. Dating from the late nineteenth century, the Khyber Rifles is a para-military force forming part of the modern Pakistan Army's Frontier Corps
Comments: (7)
Cogelv
Very good stuff. The setting is the ever-lively Northwest Frontier of British India and the time is during World War I. India is being denuded of British and Indian Regiments so they can go fight the Hun in Europe. In response Germany and Turkey are equipping the lawless tribes of "the Hills" for a jihad against the increasingly defenseless British Raj. The tribes are gathering, the mullahs are exhorting, the rumors are flying, and the government needs to know what's really going on. Something is supposedly happening in the "Heart of the Hills" but no white man even knows if there really is such a thing, or what it actually is if it exists. A mysterious woman of great beauty and dubious loyalty claims to know things and to have influence with the tribes, but she can't be trusted on her own. The government needs to send in a man. And that man is Athelstan King of the Secret Service, scion of a long line of British India officers. Cool, competent, incorruptible.

This is Haggard's "King Solomon's Mines" evolving into Fleming's "Dr. No". The beautiful, dangerous woman. The fantastic, mystical lair of the villains in the Khinjan Caves. His Majesty's man is on his own, surrounded by traitors and assassins. There's no one to trust and a mission to accomplish. And of course time is running out to save the Raj itself from certain destruction.

Mundey spent time in India, and it shows in the dialog, the characters, and their relationships. The free Kindle version is a scanned text with the usual typo and format issues but it's readable enough. Enjoyable reading.
Dog_Uoll
When asked about violence and sexual content, the reader must be aware that this book was copyrighted in 1916. Its writing and its content are marked by their time. So, if you like an elaborated and formal style of writing, it is great! If you like the more circumspect expressions of sex and violence, it's great! Talbot Mundy, the author, actually served in India, so this is his accounting of service in the British Empire at the end of the Great Game. It's all in the taste buds, folks.
Siramath
Adventure fiction written anywhere from 1890 to 1944 is a favorite of mine. I DO love Rohmer, Howard and Burroughs and am constantly on the lookout for a new author. When a little bit of research led me to Talbot Mundy (and a little more research led me to Khyber Rifles) I was excited. I got over it. While the plot and story are passable, almost nothing happens. The entire novel is an exercise in "what happens next?" while nothing happens next.
My other complaint is in the character development. While the author creates many memorable characters throughout the book, Athelstan King, the principle character, isn't one of them. For the most part Mundy never really lets us "see" who King is. He tells us. Every other page has a paragraph telling us how witty he is or noble he is. I'd rather infer through his actions, personally.
On the plus side, Mundy truly creates the look and feel of India. If that is enough, you will enjoy this book. If you are expecting Haggard, you will not.
Zaryagan
Don't buy the ripped off version from the public domain! The book is huge and floppy, the text is all messed up. No-name publisher. I'm sure the book will be great once I find a copy that's readable!
Gianni_Giant
King of the Khyber Rifles won't rank among the greats of English literature, but it is an enjoyable romp through the myths of the British Empire's "glory days" before reality came crashing in. Written in 1916 and set in the period at the beginning of the First World War, it positively reeks with the "white man's burden" of maintaining rule over the benighted savages of India and Afghanistan. If you find that attitude offensive, even in its fictional form, you won't enjoy this book. Our brave hero, Athelstan King, is a secret agent sent up into the "Hills" (they always are put in quote marks) to head off an insurrection led by a mysterious woman known as Yasmini. It's interesting in part to read the book in light of current unrest in the same part of the world- somehow neither the British nor the Russians were able to subdue the Khyber Pass (the pass between India and Afghanistan), and now the US is having similar difficulties.
It's fun reading, if you don't take it too seriously. I first ran across it in the old Classics Illustrated comics. Not sure it qualifies as a "classic," but it certainly has enough intrigue, mystery, and atmosphere to carry the reader through.
Umdwyn
Athelstan King prevents a German prompted Moslem invasion of British India during the early days of World War One. By today's standards, this is gloriously politically incorrect. Only you Dick Daring...
Gravelblade
I saw this title and decided to give it a try. I had seen the movie King of the Khyber Rifles and wanted to read the story to see how it compared to the movie. Well there is a big difference. The book is only remotely like the movie. To go into details would spoil both movie and book. I did however enjoy the book. The story is set in India of the Raj at the beginning of World War I. King is sent on a mission to the Khyber Pass to stop possible rebellion among the hill tribesmen. So much for the plot anymore and I tell the whole story.

The author, Talbot Mundy, wrote this in the period of the Pulps. This is shown by the long passages, which are characteristic of writing from this period. If you are a fan of the Robert Howard non-Conan stories, which are set in a more modern era or a fan Kipling and his stories of India. Then by all means read King of the Khyber Rifles. It will show the high adventure of the Pulp Era of story telling.
This was a great story and would be an excellent Spielberg project if brought to the big screen - sort of Indiana Jones-ish. really a fun read.