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by Amanda Cross

eBook The Players Come Again (CH) (Charnwood Large Print Library Series) download ISBN: 0708986153
Author: Amanda Cross
Publisher: Charnwood (November 1, 1991)
Language: English
ePub: 1964 kb
Fb2: 1823 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lit rtf docx lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary

Series: Charnwood Large Print Library Series.

Series: Charnwood Large Print Library Series. Hardcover: 464 pages. Publisher: Charnwood (January 1, 2001). ISBN-13: 978-0708992166. Product Dimensions: . x . inches. Back to top. Get to Know Us. Careers. Hardcover: 512 pages. ISBN-13: 978-0708986264.

Published October 1st 1989 by Ulverscroft Large Print (first published November 10th 1988).

Amanda Cross THE PLAYERS COME AGAIN ebreak Contents PART . No Word from Winifred. The Players Come Again. Kate had once gone to speak at a woman’s college in a large room furnished like a grand parlor but capable of holding rows of folding chairs.

Amanda Cross THE PLAYERS COME AGAIN ebreak Contents PART ONE Chapter One PART TWO Chapter Two PART THREE Chapter Three Chapter Four Chapter Five. On one wall hung two large portraits of the man who had given the money for the room-it bore his name-and his wife, who had herself attended the college.

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The 80s are coming to a close and Kate Fansler is using this time to tie up loose ends. Amanda Cross examines relationships and human nature in The Players Come Again, a thought-provoking novel about literature, feminism and ageing. There is no rest for the wicked as he commissions her to write a biography of reclusive Gabrielle Foxx, the quiet wife of a famous modernist author.

The Kissing Garden (CH) (Charnwood Large Print Library Series). The idea for ROSE'S STORY originated with the hugely successful television series UPSTAIRS, DOWNSTAIRS, in which Rose played a prominent part as head housemaid to the Bellamy family. pulsating with vitality and deeply.

The Players Come Again. Book in the A Kate Fansler Mystery Series).

Cross, Amanda, The Players Come Again, Writing as Amanda Cross, English professor Carolyn Heilbrun introduced her female professor sleuth in 1964, endowing Kate Fansler with a gift for urbane.

In this sophisticated, utterly absorbing mystery, academic Kate Fansler takes her detective skills to the world of literary skullduggery. Commissioned to write a biography of the enigmatic wife of the famous modernist author Emmanuel Foxx, Kate finds herself in a drama that spans four generations and two continents. To solve the mystery Kate must persue a secret passed down to three childhood friends - unusual women guarding an even more unusual mystery.
Comments: (7)
JoJogar
Kate Fansler accepts a contract from a publishing house to write a biography of Gabrielle Foxx, the wife of a celebrated novelist. Finding out who Gabrielle is turns Kate into a detective. Through interviews with the people who knew her, Kate uncovers family skeletons including an unpublished manuscript and a murder.

I was reminded of Agatha Christie's Murder In Retrospect where Poirot had to solve a murder committed decades ago. The problem with this short mystery is that the stakes aren't as high. I just didn't find Kate's mission that compelling. Cross tries to make up for this at the very end by tacking on a murder confession, but it doesn't work.

What also doesn't work is why Kate's presence is necessary. The manuscript, locked away for a few decades, could've been examined by Anne at any time. Why did she need to contact Kate? If it was that important, it would've been published anyway. If not, there would've been no loss.

Despite its problems, I enjoyed much of the novel's intelligent conversation spiced with literary allusions. Above all, I liked Kate's observations about people and life.
Waiso
This is a likeable and literate mystery story. The main character's, Kate Fansler's, book on Henry James and Thomas Hardy has been published. Kate is asked to write a biography of the wife of a prominent novelist, Emmanuel Foxx.

By way of background it is learned by the reader that Dorinda Goddard and her family accepted Anne Gringold. Anne's mother had worked for Dorinda's mother. Books were the source of the girls' fantasies.

Later Anne was asked to drop in on Gabrielle Foxx, Emmanuel's widow, when she was in London. Anne knew Nellie, Emmanuel's granddaughter. Hilda, Nellie's mother, was Sig Goddard's, Dorinda's father's, sister. When the Goddards brought Nellie to America, the girls became a threesome.

Gabrielle was sixty-six in 1955, the time of the London visit. Her son and her husband wee dead. She had met Emmanuel when she was sixteen.

In London Anne helped her boss, a publisher, set up his office. Gabrielle told Anne that scholars had started coming again, but Anne was the only person she agreed to see. Anne was to be a messenger. Gabrielle gave Anne papers that she, Gabrielle, had written over the years.

In order to write the biography of Gabrielle Foxx Kate took a leave without pay from her university position. Kate was married to Reed, a professor at the law school. Gabrielle had been a proper English girl when she eloped with a writer. Foxx's masterpiece was entitled ARIADNE. It seems that Emmanuel Foxx was also English.

The rest of the plot concerns Kate's attempt to see the surviving friends and family members and to tease out their stories. In her analysis she discovers the mystery and clarifies many matters of relevance in an interesting fashion.
Silver Globol
Amanda Cross writes 'literary' mysteries. There are no shoot-em-ups or violence. The mysteries are not to mysterious, either, that is to be admitted. Nevertheless if you like the character of Kate Fansler and her husband Reed, (and I do) you'll like the books, and the background of this one is intriguing. A man has written a famous book on the female experience, called Ariadne (after the Greek character) - turns out his wife has 'rewritten' the book from a woman's point of view... This book is best enjoyed if you are familiar with the series. Everyone should start at the beginning and read on from there!
Kipabi
Writing a biography, manuscripts, journals, literary detecting, and Virginia Woolf: "Wander no more, I say; this is the end. The oblong has been set upon square; the spiral is on top. We have been hauled over the shingle, down to the sea. The players come again." An Imperfect Spy (1995) The challenge of white male power in a Law School. Citations from John LeCarre. And A. N. Wilson's words: "Where mediocrity is the norm, it is not long before mediocrity becomes the ideal." And John Le Carre: "I invested my life in institutions - he thought without rancor - and all I am left with is myself." Amanda Cross: The Collected Stories (1997) What a remarkable collection of Kate Fansler short stories
Bulace
There has always been a rumor that the books of Emmanuel Foxx were more than inspired by his wife Gabrielle. A publisher offers Kate Fansler a large advance to write her biography. With the help of her granddaughter and her two friends Gabrielle's papers offer much more tan she bargained for.
This is a much less bloody mystery than the average Fansler. It is just as interesting however. I found myself really getting into the characters and their stories. Very good mystery.
Uleran
The overt mystery in "The Players Come Again" is trying to understand Gabrielle Foxx's life. The story is more complicated than that but this book is an examination of people's lives rather than of crime. It is a wonderful book that not only had me caring about the characters but thinking about what their lives had to say to me. As well as being interested in what Amanda Cross has to say, I really enjoy the way she puts her words together
Vijora
This book should not be included in the mystery genre. There simply is no mystery. It is more like a romance or gothic. And there is absolutely no action. The characters sit in various living rooms telling each other their histories. Even the author seems bored with them by the final pages