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eBook Inform Designer's Manual: 4th Edition download

by Graham Nelson,Gareth Rees

eBook Inform Designer's Manual: 4th Edition download ISBN: 0971311900
Author: Graham Nelson,Gareth Rees
Publisher: Dan Sanderson; 4 edition (August 1, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 576
ePub: 1415 kb
Fb2: 1499 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: txt lrf doc lit
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary

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Inform (the compiler) was written by Graham Nelson while he was writing his classic game "Curses. So not only are you getting a manual written by a top notch programmer, but an excellent writer as well. Really, though, I consider this book to be a part of Internet History. How often do you get the chance to be part of a small, relatively obscure group of artists & programmers (Interactive Fiction Authors) all over the world, and own a physical piece of it?

Graham A. Nelson (born 1968) is a British mathematician and poet and the creator of the Inform design system for creating interactive fiction (IF) games. 2001) Inform Designers Manual (4th ed), with Gareth Rees. Placet Solutions, ISBN 713119-0-0.

Graham A. He has also authored several IF games, including the acclaimed Curses (1993) and Jigsaw (1995), using the experience of writing Curses in particular to expand the range of verbs that Inform is capable of understanding. He has been described by The New York Times as "ornately literate.

Authors: Graham Nelson Gareth Rees. Feel free to highlight your textbook rentals. Included with your book. Free shipping on rental returns. 21-day refund guarantee Learn More. This text includes a critical history of interactive writings and the university games of the 1970s.

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Nelson is the author of the Inform Designer's Manual, which includes one of the first published works of interactive fiction .

Nelson is the author of the Inform Designer's Manual, which includes one of the first published works of interactive fiction theory, an essay titled "The Craft of Adventure". He has also written several important essays on interactive fiction in the field. He is one of a very small number of individuals (such as Andrew Plotkin) who are celebrated both for their creative and their technical contributions to the homebrew IF scene. a b Rothstein, Edward (1998-04-06).

Book Format: Paperback.

ISBN 13: 9780971311909.

Since its invention in 1993, Inform has been used to design hundreds of interactive novels and short stories in eight languages. This text includes a critical history of interactive writings and the university games of the 1970s. (Computer Books--Languages/Programming)
Comments: (6)
Adrierdin
The definitive guide to writing interactive fiction. Remember the text adventure games of yesteryear? Zork? BBC games? Well, they still exist, and you can write your own. An annual competition produces new, free games that anyone can play.
The manual is well-written. It's simple enough that a total newbie could pick it up and be writing a basic game in no time, while an experienced programmer would find it engaging and not overly-simplistic. The content is cleanly divided and subjects are easy to find within the book.
Using this manual, I wrote my first game and entered it into the annual competition. It ranked about median, which was good for a first attempt. If interactive fiction interests you, give it a try.
Gavinrage
Interactive Fiction is not dead. Those text adventures from the 80s are as alive today as they ever were, and they have company. Lots of people out there are writing new, even better text adventures than were previously commercially available. And many of those new games are being written in the INFORM language.

INFORM now exists as two very different versions. 6.0 and 7.0. 6.0 is a more structured language, a language that would be familiar to coders who know Pascal, C, Python, etc. 7.0 is a more "natural language" approach.

DM4 deals in INFORM 6.0, and is the definitive guide to the language. Filled with examples and excellent descriptions of commands and concepts, it can take anyone from basic simple ideas to a finished game without fail.

It's also an impressive tome. A nice hard-cover book. And while it is also available as a PDF file online, there is nothing like leaving through this volume and finding the perfect solution to your current coding issue, or learning a new concept.

Highly recommended for Inform 6.0.

Sadly, Inform 6.0 is practically deceased. More people are writing in Inform 7.0, and for the definitive book for Inform 7.0, get Aaron Reed's book on the topic, also available on Amazon.
Thetath
First of all, this book is well made. At first glance, it looks like one of those O'Rielly books, but closer inspection will reveal it's lay-flat binding that lets you open the book completely, without worrying about creasing the spine.

This book is well written. Inform (the compiler) was written by Graham Nelson while he was writing his classic game "Curses." So not only are you getting a manual written by a top notch programmer, but an excellent writer as well.

Really, though, I consider this book to be a part of Internet History. How often do you get the chance to be part of a small, relatively obscure group of artists & programmers (Interactive Fiction Authors) all over the world, and own a *physical* piece of it? I mean... sure you can download the Inform manual in PDF format and take it to Kinkos to have it bound, but the extremely limited printings of this book make it something worth having.

If you're a programmer and you're reading this, wondering just what the heck this is all about, this is a compiler & series of libraries that allow you to relatively quickly, create classic text adventure games. Instead of creating your own physics model, Inform comes with libraries that let you quickly define rooms, bottles, clocks, rubber tubing, white houses, mailboxes, elvish swords, and so on. Once you create a game, it will be playable on any number of platforms, from gameboy to palm to mac, pc, java...

If you're an enthusiastic game player with little to no programming experience looking to create a piece of interactive art... run. Run screaming. Run screaming, and don't look back. Programming isn't easy, and it will be many many months or years before you can produce a viable game.

If you're a beginning programmer looking for a fun way to get some experience, this may be a good, fun way to start. A few early successes will hopefully encourage you to work harder, and the C-like syntax will help you grasp a few programming basics.

If you're any or none of the above, check out rec.arts.int-fiction, which is where all the IF game designers hang out. :-)
Ffyan
In a word, this book is excellent.
Graham Nelson is a great writer, and he knows this subject VERY
well. The book serves as an excellent introduction to the
Inform language and to interactive fiction authoring generally
and also a good reference source. (In fact, this book is
probably a large part of the reason that Inform is so much more
popular than TADS, which is older.) Additionally, the section
on the world model, with the Ruins examples, makes a great
introduction to object-oriented programming generally. The
essays on game design issues are useful even to people using
other languages than Inform to create interactive fiction or,
for that matter, related genres such as graphical adventures.
The writing style throughout is excellent -- clear and easy
to follow, but with adequate detail. (The sidebars sometimes
provide more detail than is necessary for beginners, but these
can be safely skipped until later, and the main text makes
sense without them.) Only the appendices really come across
as very technical.
I was initially introduced to this book through the third
edition, which introduced me to and has shaped my view of
object-oriented programming. Naturally, when I saw the
announcement that the fourth edition was going to be made
available in print form, and that it would include the Ruins
examples, I rushed to preorder, and I was not disappointed.
This book is also available in other formats, which are
convenient for searching, but if you are like me you will
want a print copy.