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eBook The Village Wit download

by Mark Beyer

eBook The Village Wit download ISBN: 1453757554
Author: Mark Beyer
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (September 20, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 520
ePub: 1911 kb
Fb2: 1263 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: rtf doc lrf txt
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary

By the end of the first chapter, you'll feel you're standing inside the bookstore in rural England. The Village Wit is the kind of book you read when you're not in a hurry, or need to slow down from the hurry of your day. If printed, it would weigh in at a whopping 522 pages. Admittedly, I did find myself using my Kindle's integrated dictionary on occasion, to look up words I wasn't quite sure about. The writer in me took a few mental.

The Village Wit book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Village Wit. by. Mark Beyer. This book is about love 'as it is' rather than as we woul It has been a week since I finished reading The Village Wit and the story is still lurking in the back of my mind, stirring memories and making me think. Richard Bentley has power over women  . Did I enjoy it? Yes and no.

American Richard Bentley settles in rural England, looking for the contented life of a bookshop keeper. His wife of fourteen years has left him out of marital boredom, so Heath-on-the-Wold seems the ideal place to get lost in work and forget the past. Bentley hires Peggy White, a mid-forties townswoman who is his match in sass and intellect. Soon the rules of attraction change everything.

Mark Beyer (born September 8, 1963) is an American novelist, journalist and educator. He is originally from Franklin Park, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. He is noted for his novel The Village Wit, a story of "deception, betrayal, and dark passion.

Noted author Mark Beyer, along with Siren & Muse Publishing, bring you a story that walks in the shadows of love's corners. American Richard Bentley settles in rural England, looking for the contented life of a bookshop keeper and some fun with the local women. His wife of fourteen years left him out of "marital boredom," so Heath-on-the-Wold seems the ideal place to get lost in work and forget the past.

It has been a week since I finished reading Mark Beyer’s ‘The Village Wit’ and the story is still lurking in the back of. .The book would be worth reading for that if nothing else.

It has been a week since I finished reading Mark Beyer’s ‘The Village Wit’ and the story is still lurking in the back of my mind, stirring memories and making me think. Am I glad I read it? Absolutely. As a fledgling writer myself I know how impossibly hard it is to create a believable character of the opposite sex. So hats off to Beyer for pulling off some rather extraordinary characterizations. And now to a few small things that could have been perfect but were not. As a work of literature Beyer peppered his prose with a great many descriptive passages.

The Village Wit. Visit ww. irenandmuse. Karen K’s essays on art and books and photography made her famous among New York literati, and popular with most artists for her support of thei. hat. eason to exist, as I understand it (this recognition, in a society that had been slowly devolving into kitsch and TV). Newsmen photographed her touring Greenwich Village gallery openings, smoking cigarettes near gurus holding forth in Brooklyn Heights parlors, or stepping from taxis outside the Houston Street art-house cinema, and drinking martinis at East Side cocktail parties.

He'll explain this all, and give our imaginations the figures to uphold. I want to read this book.

How might the Olympian Gods we know from reading change if we were to allow our imaginations to see their true ages? Time changes all people - even gods - and when their day-to-day mischievous lives no longer play a role in human affairs, what then do they become? New York sculptor Minus Orth has an idea. He'll explain this all, and give our imaginations the figures to uphold. I must read this book. make him the iconoclast he is intended to b. -

Richard Bentley has power over women. His bookshop holds power in its stories. And a Heath-on-the-Wold woman wants her own power. What is Penelope White willing to do to get such power? This is the story of THE VILLAGE WIT. American Richard Bentley settles in rural England, looking for the contented life of a bookshop keeper and some fun with the local women. Heath-on-the-Wold seems the ideal place to get lost in work and forget the woman who fell out his life with the affliction of "marital boredom." Then Bentley hires Peggy White, a mid-forties townswoman who seems his match in sass and intellect. Soon, the rules of attraction open a new chapter in their lives. Who wants power? Who holds the power? THE VILLAGE WIT follows Richard and Peggy’s often humorous and sometimes dark odyssey through village life, love’s fall, sexual politics, and that place where memory and modern love-power-passion intersect. In the tradition of Iris Murdoch, Richard Ford, Margaret Atwood, and Norman Rush, THE VILLAGE WIT explores the effects of loss and the shadows found in passion's blood-red corners.
Comments: (5)
Ventelone
Mark Beyer's use of descriptive language to create his scenes took me back to the days when I gorged myself on classic literature. By the end of the first chapter, you'll feel you're standing inside the bookstore in rural England. The Village Wit is the kind of book you read when you're not in a hurry, or need to slow down from the hurry of your day. If printed, it would weigh in at a whopping 522 pages. Admittedly, I did find myself using my Kindle's integrated dictionary on occasion, to look up words I wasn't quite sure about. The writer in me took a few mental notes along the way, especially in the way Beyer crafted his auxiliary cast. Mr. Whipple, foremost among those who stick out in my mind as a character who, though the story could have been told without him, made the experience so much more enjoyable.
Nagis
Inches and inches of word-for-word conversations in an British second-hand book store.....much of which consisted of name-dropping "literate" comments and conclusions. I found it tedious. Also I think this author is pretty involved in positively "reviewing" his own book. Can it be so? He says it was "short listed" but I don't quite know where or how that came to be. So....I should have been more skeptical from the get go.
Shadowredeemer
This author of this book is a good friend of my husband and myself. This was his 1st published work, we enjoyed it very much!
Dori
"The Village Wit" is not so much literature as it is meta-literature -- literature about literature -- and that's all right, since it's about a rare books dealer in the Cotswalds reegion of southwest England. Only he's an American. Richard Bentley is fed up with love after an unsuccessful 14-year marriage. He thrives on one-night stands, minus the emotional investment that a longer relationship would require. So he is chary of going to far with his new employee, Peggy White, who is more than his match in sass and intellect. "The Village Wit," the name of Bentley's bookshop, is highly embroidered and a bit over-written and under-edited, but for those who like to poke into the shadows of love, this book is for them. And, for a guy, he writes some damned good sex scenes.

Robert Knight, author, Journalistic Writing: building the Skill, Honing the Craft (Marion Street Press, 2010)
Kendis
I looked at the reviews and was enticed, though there were only two. I, however, was disappointed. The book is self indulgent and takes itself far too seriously. Waste of time.