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eBook Tunnel (American Literature Series) download

by MR William H Gass PhD

eBook Tunnel (American Literature Series) download ISBN: 1564784487
Author: MR William H Gass PhD
Publisher: Dalkey Archive Press; Audiobook edition (April 1, 1999)
Language: English
ePub: 1284 kb
Fb2: 1329 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lrf mbr doc txt
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Classics

by Gass PhD, MR William H (Contributor). ISBN-13: 978-1564784681. Since we'd lost one of our most important American writers late last year, I've been catching up with the work of William H. Gass.

William Gaddis (Author), Gass PhD, MR William H (Introduction). Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Thirty years in the making, William Gass's second novel first appeared on the literary scene in 1995. Gass and Gaddis redeem the contemporary American novel and Dalkey Archive should be congratulated for its devotion to publishing American masters whom America has not yet properly recognized as such. I really can't say enough in praise of this substantive literary novel, which is profoundly wise and brilliantly crafted and even luminous as a literary legacy sure to render Gass prominent, permanent billing among the American masters of the late 20th century.

Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). I read an interview with Stanley Elkin where he mentioned William Gass as one of the writers he admired and as a result I went and bought a copy of the "The Tunnel" completely forgetting Stanley Elkin. Luckily I retraced my steps and have discovered a new slippery slope to slide down. It is funny in a dark way and a light way and is written at many different levels, but Elkin digs deep into the American way of life and the pursuit of happiness and writes beautiful prose.

As an essayist, his prose is gorgeously musical, ticking along smoothly as if measured out by metronome.

The Tunnel is William H. Gass's 1995 novel that took 26 years to write and earned him the American Book Award of 1996. It was also a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner award. The Tunnel is the work of William Frederick Kohler, a professor of history at an unnamed university in the American Midwest.

A dazzling new collection of essays-on reading, writing, form, and thought-from one of America's master writers. It begins with the personal, both past and present. He writes about a few topics equally burning but less loved (the Nobel Prize-winner and Nazi sympathizer Knut Hamsun; the Holocaust). Finally, Gass ponders theoretical matters connected with literature: form and metaphor, and specifically, one of its genetic parts-the sentence.

There are plenty of cultural references which non-Americans will probably struggle with (and perhaps those who are younger).

Thirty years in the making, William Gass's second novel first appeared. There are plenty of cultural references which non-Americans will probably struggle with (and perhaps those who are younger). A whole section on the sweets and candies of childhood would probably be a delight to readers of a certain age. What there is not (certainly near the beginning of the novel) is interaction with other characters.

William H. Gass He received an .

Thirty years in the making, William Gass's second novel first appeared on the literary scene in 1995, at which time it was promptly hailed as an indisputable masterpiece. The story of a middle aged professor who, upon completion of his massive historical study, "Guilt and Innocence in Hitler's Germany," finds himself writing a novel about his own life instead of the introduction to his magnum opus. in philosophy from Kenyon College in 1947 and a PhD in philosophy from Cornell University in 1954.

William Howard Gass (July 30, 1924 – December 6, 2017) was an American novelist, short-story writer, essayist, critic, and philosophy professor

William Howard Gass (July 30, 1924 – December 6, 2017) was an American novelist, short-story writer, essayist, critic, and philosophy professor. He wrote three novels, three collections of short stories, a collection of novellas, and seven volumes of essays, three of which have won National Book Critics Circle Award prizes and one of which, A Temple of Texts (2006), won the Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism. His 1995 novel The Tunnel received the American Book Award

Thirty years in the making, William Gass's second novel first appeared on the literary scene in 1995, at which time it was promptly hailed as an indisputable masterpiece. The story of a middle aged professor who, upon completion of his massive historical study, "Guilt and Innocence in Hitler's Germany," finds himself writing a novel about his own life instead of the introduction to his magnum opus. "The Tunnel" meditates on history, hatred, unhappiness, and, above all, language.

Comments: (7)
Globus
Jesus. Christ. This a nightmare. A gorgeous, linguistically breath-taking masterwork 26 years in the making, but a nightmare none the less. William Frederich Kholer, who might or might not be a proxy for Gass himself, just vomits hate at EVERYTHING. His placid, academic life, his miserable midwestern childhood, his straight-out-of-a-nightmare parents, his feckless colleagues, his wife, his kids, his students his culture, his age, and above all, himself.

And yet the whole thing is told in a crazed first person voice that moves with hypnotic virtuosity between flashbacks of domestic life, bitter childhood reminiscences and that is shot through with rants, screeds, dirty limericks, experimental typesetting and word play so acidic and so funny that I actually found myself laughing out loud at several points. Like Celine, Gass creates a sickifying, vaguely fascist logic that seems to reach out, grasp at, and state right into the very worst parts of oneself. If Dante's inferno had a 10th level, it would be sitting in a room having a conversation with this books narrator.

This is a potent, at times jaw-dropping work of literature, and easily stands toe to toe with the more widely celebrated works of its age, but it's also an invitation to explore raw hatred in its numerous, crippling forms. The Tunnel offers a crushing, deforming view of humanity and history that I was almost completely revolted by. It's also, I think, a masterpiece. Pick this up at your own risk
Anarawield
Simply amazing. As a result of this one novel, Gass has become one of my favorite authors, with the likes of Joyce, Pynchon, Mann and Wallace. Every page, every paragraph is filled with prose beautiful, inventive, and challenging. Not for the squeamish, the faint of heart: There's raw emotions, real evil unearthed in THE TUNNEL. But if you love literary works and a challenge, don't miss this book.
Zetadda
Very difficult read; otherwise good.
Windbearer
I was drawn into the Tunnel and could not escape its disturbing reality. Others have identified the virtuosity of Gass's literary craft, I agree, but the book is more than literary genius, it is a haunting look at life, death, and all the follies between.
Brick my own
Consider that William Gass created this masterpiece over roughly the same time frame it takes to pay off the average mortgage -- 652 pages in 30 years. One has to respect such care in crafting The Tunnel. How many times was this draft edited to create in essence a final draft written at the plodding, prodding pace of 22 pages per annum? Gass took more time crafting The Tunnel than Joyce did Ulysses. And it shows. The syntax is not of this world. His use of metaphor is off the charts in its creativity. There are worlds, even galaxies, in his words. The writing is sheer poetry in places -- a pure joy to read. He is honest, pithy, probing, penetrating and very often hilarious in his Notes from Underground. Like Proust I recommend that you read Gass slowly to revel in the world in his every well-placed word. There is unquestionable genius in this work as evident as the genius of William Gaddis or Joyce or Proust. Gass and Gaddis redeem the contemporary American novel and Dalkey Archive should be congratulated for its devotion to publishing American masters whom America has not yet properly recognized as such. I really can't say enough in praise of this substantive literary novel, which is profoundly wise and brilliantly crafted and even luminous as a literary legacy sure to render Gass prominent, permanent billing among the American masters of the late 20th century. Savor the writing of William Gass: real genius resides underground in The Tunnel.
spark
FOR MADMEN ONLY.
I_LOVE_228
This is a very complicated and challenging book. I listened to a lecture by the then-81-year-old author, William Gass, in 2006, and almost couldn't keep up with him.
Truly remarkable.