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eBook The Mystery of Edwin Drood and Other Stories (Wordsworth Classics) (Classics Library (NTC)) download

by S.L. Fildes and Hablot K. Browne (Phiz),Charles Dickens

eBook The Mystery of Edwin Drood and Other Stories (Wordsworth Classics) (Classics Library (NTC)) download ISBN: 1853267295
Author: S.L. Fildes and Hablot K. Browne (Phiz),Charles Dickens
Publisher: Wordsworth Editions Ltd; Revised edition (October 5, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 496
ePub: 1695 kb
Fb2: 1775 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: docx lrf lit txt
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Classics

Fildes and Hablot K. Browne (Phiz)

Fildes and Hablot K. Browne (Phiz). Dickens's final novel, left unfinished at his death, is a tale of mystery whose fast-paced action takes place in an ancient cathedral city and in some of the darkest places in nineteenth-century London. At the centre of the plot lie the baffling disappearance of Edwin Drood and the many explanations of his whereabouts. AUTHOR Charles John Huffam Dickens FRSA (7 February 1812 - 9 June 1870), pen-name "Boz", was the most popular English novelist of the Victorian era and one of the most popular of all time. He created some of literature's most memorable characters.

Charles Dickens (Author), . Dickens' final novel, left unfinished at his death in 1870, is a mystery story much influenced by the 'Sensation Novel' as written by his friend Wilkie Collins. The action takes place in an ancient cathedral city and in some of the darkest places in Victorian London. Drugs, disappearances, sexual obsession, disguise and a possible murder are among the themes and motifs.

To ask other readers questions about The Mystery of Edwin Drood and . Shelves: classics, 19th-century

Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Shelves: classics, 19th-century. I thoroughly enjoyed Edwin Drood; however, I was unpleasantly surprised to find that, as the mystery began to come to a conclusion, the story ended. Charles John Huffam Dickens was a writer and social critic who created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.

The Mystery of Edwin Drood and Other Stories. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read.

Fildes and Hablot K. Mighty Ape. Mighty Ape Products. What others are saying. The Mystery of Edwin Drood by Charles Dickens. Warning: When I am an Old Woman I Shall Wear Purple by Jenny Joseph.

Dickens's final novel, left unfinished at his death in 1870, is a mystery story much influenced by the Sensation Novel as written by his friend Wilkie Collins. Drugs, disappearances, sexual obsession, disguise and a possible murder are among the themes.

The Mystery of Edwin Drood is the final novel by Charles Dickens, originally published in 1870. Though the novel is named after the character Edwin Drood, it focuses more on Drood's uncle, John Jasper, a precentor, choirmaster and opium addict,. Though the novel is named after the character Edwin Drood, it focuses more on Drood's uncle, John Jasper, a precentor, choirmaster and opium addict, who is in love with his pupil, Rosa Bud. Miss Bud, Edwin Drood's fiancée, has also caught the eye of the high-spirited and hot-tempered Neville Landless. Landless and Edwin Drood take an instant dislike to one another.

Charles Dickens - The Mystery of Edwin Drood. Edwin Drood is contracted to marry Orphan Rosa, but they break the engagement off-and soon afterwards Edwin disappears. Dickens died before completing the story, leaving the mystery unsolved and encouraging successive generations of readers to turn detective. Показать полность. n addition to its tantalizing crime, the novel also offers a characteristically Dickensian mix of the fantastical world of the imagination and a vibrantly journalistic depiction of gritty reality. The main issue in the novel is the disappearance of Edwin Drood and the suspicion that he has been murdered. Also included in this volume are a number of unjustly neglected stories and sketches, with subjects as different as murder and guilt and childhood romance. This unusual selection illustrates Dickens's immense creativity and versatility. Format Paperback 496 pages.

Dickens' final novel, left unfinished at his death in 1870, is a mystery story much influenced by the 'Sensation Novel' as written by his friend Wilkie Collins. The action takes place in an ancient cathedral city and in some of the darkest places in Victorian London. Drugs, disappearances, sexual obsession, disguise and a possible murder are among the themes and motifs. A sombre and menacing atmosphere, a fascinating range of characters and Dickens' usual command of language combine to make this an exciting and tantalising story. Also included in this volume are a number of unjustly neglected stories and sketches, with subjects as different as murder , guilt and childhood romance.
Comments: (7)
Phobism
I'm a huge Dickens fan...have reread everyone of his novels. BUT had never read the unfinished Edwin Drood. It seemed to me, why bother? But in my old age, I took a crack at it...knowing Dickens was dying when he wrote it, I didn't know what to expect. It's very different from his other works, leaner, sparser, darker. But the Master is still there, making me want to keep reading and know how it resolved. This "finished" version, published during the bicentennial of Dicken's birth, really is good! The author, a retired British diplomat, assumes the mantle quite well, and as I'm not finished with it yet, I will say, I will be satisfied as to how he wraps up all the loose ends, while hewing to the original feel of Dicken's story. Of course, he is not Dickens...even in ill health, Dickens still was killing it with his colors and textures and feel. All in all, I'd recommend this version.
Foginn
Like many people, I’m sure, I read “The Mystery of Edwin Drood,” and wanted to know how it ended. If it hadn't been a mystery, things might have been different, but we are left with the disappearance of a healthy, optimistic young man, whose uncle lusts after the young man’s fiancée (not knowing their engagement has been severed). We are also made aware that the uncle has an opium addiction, and the woman who operates the opium den he frequents may have overheard things he said while under the influence of the drug.

Unable to imagine a satisfactory ending to the story myself, I researched on the Internet, to see if anyone knew where Dickens’ plot was going, but there were only a few clues. Luckily, several people had attempted to write a conclusion to the Edwin Drood mystery, using what clues were available, and I picked Leon Garfield’s version, which had several good reviews.

Trying to copy Dickens’ writing style is admittedly impossible. His complex prose and skill at detailed description must have developed considerably over the years. I was, however, comfortable with the continuation by Leon Garfield, which remained true to the characters already drawn for us by Dickens. I imagine the book would have been longer, had Dickens ever finished it, but I did not feel cheated in any way with the faster pace of the narrative, and the culmination answered those questions that nagged at me when I came to the sudden end of Dickens’ incomplete story.

Whether the ending was the one Dickens intended, we shall never know, but from the clues he left, it cannot be far wrong. The good guys get the girls, and actions and behavior introduced in Dickens’ incomplete original are explained. I think Dickens probably would have ended with his usual tidying up, where almost every minor character is re-visited and put to rest (even if we don’t particularly wonder about what happens to them).

All in all, I was very satisfied with this book; it put my mind at rest.
Najinn
I knew at the outset that Dickens died before he had the chance to finish this novel, but I didn't realize how incredibly frustrated I was going to be because of it! It seems that he was just getting somewhere, and that there was going to be some climactic action coming up shortly, and then poof. No more book. But on the other hand, it was so good getting to that point, and as noted, I am aware that The Mystery of Edwin Drood was unfinished, so I can't say that I was all that frustrated, really. It's the getting to the end (or the leave-off point) that mattered, and it was a great ride.

I won't go over the story/plot here; it is very well known. Movies have been made; I believe there was a stage production or two as well, and there are (as I saw written somewhere) entire websites and pundits devoted to solving the mystery and playing "what-if" in an effort to provide an ending.

This edition has a preface by Peter Ackroyd, a Dickens biographer, and an appendix by GK Chesterton. Chesterton provides several theories about what may have followed if Dickens had been alive to finish his work.

One more thing: I read this on the heels of Dan Simmons' most excellent novel "Drood," and it puts a lot into perspective.

I would definitely recommend it -- if you MUST have an ending, then don't read it, but as I said above...the getting there is most of the fun. Most excellent.
JOIN
Dickens does it again! Here is a good mystery well written. I was hesitant to read an unfinished book but became interested when I saw a pbs adaptation on Amazon video. Like other adaptations they created an ending, which I liked. The book left everything open ended, but led down a different path. There are themes in the story that are timeless: a man obsessed about a young woman that doesn't like him and starts to fear him, jealousy, drug abuse, child abuse, and so on. I wasn't sure where some of the characters fit into the story, probably because the book was never finished. The fact that there are things that will never be resolved doesn't take away from it's being worthwhile to read.
felt boot
I understand the frustration of the reviewer below. I have uploaded a photo of Oxford's Our Mutual Friend side by side with their Mysery of Edwin Drood. As you ca see, the font size of Drood is smaller than that of Our Mutual Friend (which is the norm for Oxford Classics). The print is often faded in a line or two of pages of Drood as well, unlike the evenly always clear, very legible ink of Our Mutual Friend. If you have good eyes, the smaller font size and inking problems should not be a big problem. The edition itself is as good as any other Oxford Classics edition. I don't know of a competing scholarly edition,.
Hudora
I think The Mystery of Edwin Drood is the best Dickens I have read, with superlative characterization, a wonderful complex story line and gripping descriptions. When I read it, I did not know that it was Dickens' last work and that it was unfinished. There is quite a lot of material on the Internet indicating how Dickens probably would have finished the novel, and a fairly recent PBS Masterpiece Classic has its own interpretation of the story...plus a happy ending. I know I'll read this book again.