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by Edward Said

eBook Reflections on Exile : And Other Literary and Cultural Essays download ISBN: 1862074445
Author: Edward Said
Publisher: Granta Books (September 30, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 656
ePub: 1500 kb
Fb2: 1235 kb
Rating: 4.1
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Category: Literature
Subcategory: Classics

This collection brings together Edward Said's essays on literary and cultural topics from over three decades. Condition: Used: Good.

This collection brings together Edward Said's essays on literary and cultural topics from over three decades. As the title essay shows.

Edward Said (1935-2003) was one of the world's most influential literary and cultural critics. Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, he was the author of twenty-two books, including Orientalism, Culture and Imperialism and Beginnings. He was also a music critic, opera scholar, pianist and the most eloquent spokesman for the Palestinian cause in the West.

Start by marking Reflections on Exile and Other Essays as Want to. .

Start by marking Reflections on Exile and Other Essays as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. With their powerful blend of political and aesthetic concerns, Edward W. Said's writings have transformed the field of literary studies. This long-awaited collection of literary and cultural essays, the first since Harvard University Press published The World, the Text, and the Critic in 1983, reconfirms what no one can doubt-that Said is the most impressive, With their powerful blend of political and aesthetic concerns, Edward W.

Edward Said introduces his collected essays, Reflections on Exile, with a poignant hymn to New York, the .

Edward Wadie Said was born on 1 November 1935, to Hilda Said and Wadie . about the theoretical bases of literary criticism.

Edward Wadie Said was born on 1 November 1935, to Hilda Said and Wadie Said, a businessman in Jerusalem, then part of British-governed Mandatory Palestine (1920–48). Wadie Said was a Palestinian man who soldiered in the . Afterwards, that war-time military service earned American citizenship to Said père and his family. Between Worlds, Reflections on Exile and Other Essays (2002) pp. 556–57.

Essays and criticism on Edward W. Said's Reflections on Exile and Other Essays . 2 Homework Help Questions with Expert Answers. Said's Reflections on Exile and Other Essays - Reflections on Exile and Other Essays - (Magill’s Literary Annual 1991-2005).

This long-awaited collection of literary and cultural essays, the first since Harvard . This long-awaited collection of literary and cultural essays, the first since Harvard University Press published The World, the Text, and the Critic in 1983, reconfirms what no one can doubt-that Said is the most impressive, consequential, and elegant critic of our time-and offers further evidence of how much the fully engaged critical mind can contribute to. the reservoir of value, thought, and action essential to our lives and our culture.

Choose file format of this book to download . Exiles blmsh Exiles in literature blmsh.

Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Reflections on exile : and other literary and cultural essays Edward W. Said. Book's title: Reflections on exile : and other literary and cultural essays Edward W. National Bibliographic Agency Control Number: (OCoLC)247904984. Download now Reflections on exile : and other literary and cultural essays Edward W. Said: Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

concerns, Edward W. experience, his book is a source of immeasurable intellectual delight.

book by Edward W.

This collection brings together Edward Said's essays on literary and cultural topics from over three decades. As the title essay shows, Said's own exile and the fate of the Palestinians have given form to the questions he has pursued. These essays give an insight into the formation of the critic and the development of an intellectual vocation. They cover a diverse range of topics, from the heroics of Tarzan to the machismo of Ernest Hemingway. Said offers different angles on writers and artists such as George Orwell, Herman Melville, Joseph Conrad, and Raymond Williams. Many of the central debates in the humanities over the last 30 years are addressed.
Comments: (7)
Ynneig
Excelent product and service
Falya
This order was managed decently.
Jugami
Very important book for my research
avanger
Edward Said was a Christian Palestinian who was born in Jerusalem, educated in Cairo, and became a Professor of English at Columbia University, as well as the most articulate spokesperson for the Palestinian cause. I've read his most famous work, "Orientalism," as well as an easier, philosophical companion, "Covering Islam." "Orientalism," the word, has now becomes incorporated in the English language, and one of the definitions Webster's now recognizes, largely due to this work, is: "a viewpoint, as held by someone in the West, in which Asia or specifically, the Arabic Middle East is seen variously as exotic, mysterious, irrational, etc.: term used to impute a patronizing attitude." Professor Said died in 2003, and this book is a form of "summing up" of his life, and his viewpoints, and covers a wildly eclectic range of subjects and interests. Consider that an essay on the greatest and most famous singer in the Arab world in the 20th Century, Umm Kalthoum, is followed by an essay entitled "Introduction to Moby-Dick."

There are 46 essays in total, and their diversity ensures that some will induce serious eye-glazing in the reader, and for me those usual involved the ones on literary criticism. For example, there is an essay comparing Conrad and Nietzsche that only true literary specialists could appreciate, maybe all 10 of them. (Said was an expert on Conrad.) Likewise the essay entitled "Sense and Sensibility" which starts with the literary criticism of E.D. Hirsch. On the other hand, numerous essays resonated. A "Standing Civil War" is on the English fabulist T. E. Lawrence, a prime conduit for Orientalist thought, and of whom Said says: "...Lawrence becomes narrator and actor slowly being destroyed by a sense of consuming deceit." Said has a solid essay on George Orwell, and given Said's outlook as expressed in "Orientalism," he savages V. S. Naipaul. Consider: "To say that Naipaul resembles a scavenger, then, is to say that he now prefers to render the ruins and derelictions of postcolonial history without tenderness... he prefers to indict the guerrillas for their pretensions rather than indict the imperialism that drove them to insurrection..." Or, "Naipaul wouldn't make a trip to Israel, for example, which is not to say that he wouldn't find rabbinical laws governing daily behavior any less repressive than Khomeini's. No, his audience knows Israel is OK, "Islam" not." There is also a solid essay on the "Grey Eminence," Walter Lippmann. One of the most moving essays is the one which gives its title to this collection, and are the thoughts of the author about his life as an exile from his place of birth, to "have been exiled by exiles" as he puts it.

For me the most fascinating essay is "The Quest for Gillo Pontecorvo," and it is an interview with the famous Italian director whose film, "The Battle of Algiers" was proclaimed by Said as one of the two greatest political movies ever made. And simply learning how the movie was made, in Algiers, so soon after the bitter war of liberation, was illuminating, and worth the price of the book alone. Since Said is a Palestinian it was only natural that he press Pontecorvo on directing another movie, this time on the Palestinian issue. Pontecorvo declined, stating reasons that were not very convincing.
The last essay in the collection is entitled "The Clash of Definitions," which is a serious and worthwhile critique of Huntington's "A Clash of Civilizations." Said makes the now familiar point concerning the transformation of American Indians from "savages" to "victims" in less than a generation, but reinforces it with references to Hertog's "The Mirror of Herodotus," which painstakingly shows how Herodotus constructed an image of a barbarian "Other," in his case, of the Scythians. One of Said's central conclusions is that: "...a great deal of what used to be thought of as settled fact, or tradition, is revealed to be a fabrication for mass consumption in the here and now."

Overall, a very worthwhile collection of essays, and an enduring 5-star legacy to his memory.
Gardall
It is easy to get off on the wrong foot with Said if you are distracted by ideology and feel yourself threatened. What one has to do is look beyond the politics for long enough to see Said for what he is, namely, an intellectual who has devoted his life to learning. This is terribly rare these days. Sontag held the spot light for years as America's premier intellectual. Gore Vidal still has a role to play, Edmund Wilson and Lionel Trilling both deserve mention, as do others, but in the end we are talking about a handful of people who can seriously be compared to the likes of Jean-Paul Sartre. American academics may be intellectual but they are rarely if ever intellectuals. I am not certain why, but Said, an expert on music among other things, succeeded in creating this role for himself. These essays provide a great introduction into the breadth of his thought. Like all intellectuals, he has his moments of stupidity and can be blindingly prejudiced, but then again so could Edmund Wilson and Sartre himself. What becomes apparent with intellectuals is that all of life gets submitted to intellectual scrutiny. There is none of this, "That's not my field" stuff. Everything, including Philly steak sandwiches, gets analyzed. The erudition is impressive, but then finally it is love that stands out, not learning. Said is a lover of life, and that, ladies and gentlemen, can't be taught.
Joni_Dep
The lies about Edward Said are more frequently encountered than his actual words, at least as far as most of the media are concerned, which is another reason to actually read his books, as opposed to reading people's opinions about them. He is supposed to be a Marxist (because he occasionally writes about Marx as somebody whose thinking has had a concrete effect upon the world, which, let's face it, it has had); he is supposed to be an apologist for terrorism (never mind that, as Forrest Gump would say, terrorism is as terrorism does - that, for example, the Contras were, from the Sandinistan point of view, terrorists, but because they were trained and funded by the CIA they are instead "freedom fighters"). He is supposed, by some reviewers, to believe that "all texts are meaningless" and that what writers intend has nothing to do with anything. A quick glance at his actual works will dispel all these illusions, unless you are so emotionally committed to a certain point of view that your rational brain is on permanent holiday in the Adirondacks, or wherever.
On top of all this, the fact that he's a tenured professor in Columbia is supposed to mitigate against his qualifications for explaining and interpreting the complexities of Arabic culture to the rest of us. Oh, he's a martini-sipping Bach-lover, what does he know about oppression. Nobody supposes that the fact that, say, Harold Bloom, is also a tenured professor, should detract from Bloom's qualities as an expert on European and American culture.
His most famous work has probably been his meticulous unpicking of the attitudes of European and American colonists towards "the Orient" - a phrase that can only appear within inverted commas after reading his brilliant "Orientalism". But this collection, representing 30 years of reviews and speeches, reveals the (to me) startling range of Said's interests. There are meticulous and beautifully forensic essays on TE Lawrence and Samuel Huntington (the latter particularly timely, as Huntington has been widely cited in the aftermath of September 11th, and Said shows us just how partisan and polemical Huntington's supposedly objective analysis is.) There's also a tender tribute to Johnny Weissmuller's portrayal of "Tarzan", and a spirited eulogy to a celebrated belly-dancer, as well as a wonderful introduction to "Moby-Dick" that, to me, represents the best Melville criticism I've ever seen.
Said is one of the few intellectuals in America who has never ceased to be aware of the potentially disastrous separation of culture from politics. His career has been both a crusade against misinformation and lies, and a noble tribute to the power of culture to help us think again about reality. This book is an excellent introduction to his work.