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eBook Walking download

by Henry David Thoreau

eBook Walking download ISBN: 1463701438
Author: Henry David Thoreau
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (July 18, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 28
ePub: 1873 kb
Fb2: 1313 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: azw txt rtf lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Classics

Henry David Thoreau crafted essays that reflect his speculative and probing cast of mind. 17 people found this helpful.

Henry David Thoreau crafted essays that reflect his speculative and probing cast of mind. In his poems, he gave voice to his private sentiments and spiritual aspirations in the plain style of New England speech. Now, The Library of America brings together these indispensable works in one authoritative volume.

Walking (Full Text) Lyrics. I wish to speak a word for Nature, for absolute freedom and wildness, as contrasted with a freedom and culture merely civil-to regard man as an inhabitant, or a part and parcel of Nature, rather than a member of society. I have met with but one or two persons in the course of my life who understood the art of Walking, that is, of taking walks-who had a genius, so to speak, for SAUNTERING, which word is beautifully derived "from idle people who roved about the country, in the Middle Ages, and asked charity, under pretense of going a la Sainte Terre

Henry David Thoreau (see name pronunciation; July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) was an American essayist, poet, and philosopher.

Henry David Thoreau (see name pronunciation; July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) was an American essayist, poet, and philosopher. A leading transcendentalist, he is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay "Civil Disobedience" (originally published as "Resistance to Civil Government"), an argument for disobedience to an unjust state.

Walking, or sometimes referred to as "The Wild", is a lecture by Henry David Thoreau first delivered at the Concord Lyceum on April 23, 1851. It was written between 1851 and 1860, but parts were extracted from his earlier journals. Thoreau read the piece a total of ten times, more than any other of his lectures. Walking" was first published as an essay in the Atlantic Monthly after his death in 1862.

I liked it that Thoreau sorted life into the sacred and the profane, the true and the trivial, the living and the dead

I liked it that Thoreau sorted life into the sacred and the profane, the true and the trivial, the living and the dead. Take the opening paragraphs of his essay Walking : I wish to speak a word for Nature, for absolute freedom and wildness, as contrasted with a freedom and culture merely civil,-to regard man as an inhabitant, or a part and parcel of Nature, rather than a member of society. Poems and novels are not what concern me here, however.

Walking Quotes Showing 1-30 of 82. Wildness is the preservation of the World. Henry David Thoreau, Walking. Genius is a light which makes the darkness visible, like the lightning’s flash, which perchance shatters the temple of knowledge itself,-and not a taper lighted at the hearth-stone of the race, which pales before the light of common day. ― Henry David Thoreau, Walking.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Henry David Thoreau : A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers Walden; Or, Life in the Woods The Maine Woods Cape Cod (Library of America). 2 Mb. The Writings of Henry David Thoreau in 20 Volumes. Категория: philosophy, social sciences. 1. 8 Mb. 1 Mb.

First published in 1862 in The Atlantic Monthly. I wish to speak a word for Nature, for absolute freedom and wildness, as contrasted with a freedom and culture merely civil - to regard man as an inhabitant, or a part and parcel of Nature, rather than a member of society.

This anthology is a thorough introduction to classic literature for those who have not yet experienced these literary masterworks. For those who have known and loved these works in the past, this is an invitation to reunite with old friends in a fresh new format. From Shakespeare s finesse to Oscar Wilde s wit, this unique collection brings together works as diverse and influential as The Pilgrim s Progress and Othello. As an anthology that invites readers to immerse themselves in the masterpieces of the literary giants, it is must-have addition to any library
Comments: (7)
Hystana
“I am alarmed when It happens that I have walked a mile into the woods bodily, without getting there in spirit. “ (Henry David Thoreau, WALKING)

Thoreau has a very vigorous animosity against walking for exercise or efficiency--going from place to place with the least diversion. I am not sure what his deeper reasons for being ornery about it might be, but the attitude can be neatly characterized, and maybe pigeonholed, as a predictable Transcendentalist strategy against living only for physical reasons and not the more crucial, more mindful, transcendental purposes. These Transcedentalist writers of the middle 1800’s, including Emerson and others, were convinced that people were not fully achieving the spiritual, the loftier, aspect of life.

Clearly mindful walking, for Thoreau, can generate, a productive collision of our values, the values that the society inculcates in us. Things like efficiency and purpose and even the search for personal perfection of body with all the attendant concern for how we are perceived physically are devalued. For Thoreau walking was a ritual not a mechanical physical process or a mindless activity.

This long essay--for that is what it is--can be read in a few hours. But it is large in scope. It moves into a larger discussion of the necessity of wildness, the wildness of nature and of the environment and wildness in the internal make-up of human beings.

While WALKING is not as powerfully and tightly styled as Thoreau's greatest essays, it is genuine Thoreau, personally engaging, sometimes quotable, and often startlingly neighborly.
Dont_Wory
"Life consists with wildness. The most alive is the wildest. Not yet subdued to man, its presence refreshes him. One who pressed forward incessantly and never rested from his labors, who grew fast and made infinite demands on life, would always find himself in a new country or wilderness, and surrounded by the raw material of life. "

"I rejoice that horses and steers have to be broken before they can be made the slaves of men, and that men themselves have some wild oats still left to sow before they become submissive members of society. "

"There is something servile in the habit of seeking after a law which we may obey. We may study the laws of matter at and for our convenience, but a successful life knows no law. It is an unfortunate discovery certainly, that of a law which binds us where we did not know before that we were bound. Live free, child of the mist--and with respect to knowledge we are all children of the mist. The man who takes the liberty to live is superior to all the laws, by virtue of his relation to the lawmaker. "

"Above all, we cannot afford not to live in the present. He is blessed over all mortals who loses no moment of the passing life in remembering the past. Unless our philosophy hears the cock crow in every barnyard within our horizon, it is belated. That sound commonly reminds us that we are growing rusty and antique in our employments and habits of thoughts. His philosophy comes down to a more recent time than ours. There is something suggested by it that is a newer testament,--the gospel according to this moment. He has not fallen astern; he has got up early and kept up early, and to be where he is is to be in season, in the foremost rank of time. It is an expression of the health and soundness of Nature, a brag for all the world,--healthiness as of a spring burst forth, a new fountain of the Muses, to celebrate this last instant of time. Where he lives no fugitive slave laws are passed. Who has not betrayed his master many times since last he heard that note?"
Bedy
I’d give it 3.5 stars. This is an essay about walking though Thoreau tends to meaner mentally as he does on his physical walks. He touches upon architecture etc., and its more the thoughts he’s had while walking than anything, methinks. I had trouble getting into unlike Walden which I devoured much like my grandmothers apple pie after not eating for two days. It’s not his most inspirational work.
Cashoutmaster
A classic in most regards and worth reading. At one level, Thoreau paints wonderful pictures with his word, yet on another level, substance is lacking. There is a feeling of "where is he going with this?". Yet the point of Walking is really not to go "someplace", just walk. But not to walk just anywhere, to walk in the wild. With this understanding this is a good read.
Tebei
This book offers an inside-look at the mindset of 19th Century America. The West, the wild, and the future are key concepts, often overlapping each other. Thoreau offers some good thoughts on what culture should and should not be, on the importance of our relation with nature, and on the importance of "wild" nature.
But he also seems to glorify farming, which is basically the process of taming the wild, he has no attention for what happens with indigenous peoples, and he completely neglects the importance of history. Even when we take into account that this short book was written in a completely different time frame than ours, this makes it come out as unbalanced in my view.
Still, there are some sentences you will probably highlight and note down for further reflection. I know I did.
Winail
Take a walk. What a novel idea. Get away from it all and just get away. A great idea expounded by a great mind. More of us need to just do it and clear our heads and let Nature pull us into its heart. Thoreau is a great mind & great writer.
Dig in and enjoy this short read.
Ishnjurus
Lovely. This thinking man led a slower paced life I admire. In the now, in touch with nature. Sigh..... Why do we all feel too busy to just go for leisurely walks? What a shame, our modern day society. Cheers to the Unpluggers. Is that a term? It is now.
If you're a hiking fanatic... you've missed the point of this book. "Walking" is a wonderful book about the art of sauntering and taking it all in. I was a hiker until I came across this book and the work of John Muir. I have a different relationship with nature now. An excellent read and a seminal work.