carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Robinson Crusoe (Oxford World's Classics)

eBook Robinson Crusoe (Oxford World's Classics) download

by Thomas Keymer,James Kelly,Daniel Defoe

eBook Robinson Crusoe (Oxford World's Classics) download ISBN: 0199553971
Author: Thomas Keymer,James Kelly,Daniel Defoe
Publisher: Oxford University Press; Reissue edition (April 15, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 384
ePub: 1653 kb
Fb2: 1525 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: azw lrf txt doc
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Classics

Daniel Defoe's enthralling story-telling and imaginatively detailed descriptions have ensured that his fiction masquerading as fact .

Daniel Defoe's enthralling story-telling and imaginatively detailed descriptions have ensured that his fiction masquerading as fact remains one of the most famous stories in English literature. On one level a simple adventure story. Inspire a love of reading with Prime Book Box for Kids Discover delightful children's books with Prime Book Box, a subscription that delivers new books every 1, 2, or 3 months - new customers receive 15% off your first box.

Daniel Defoe (Author), Thomas Keymer (Author), James Kelly (Contributor) & 0 more. I've been working my way through the classics and actually reading all of those old familiars whose plots you know but that you've never actually finished

Daniel Defoe (Author), Thomas Keymer (Author), James Kelly (Contributor) & 0 more. I've been working my way through the classics and actually reading all of those old familiars whose plots you know but that you've never actually finished. I have been delighted by how many of those books remain current, exciting and entertaining for young readers. Treasure Island" and "Kidnapped" are as ripping as you could want.

Robinson Crusoe Oxford World's Classics Oxford world's classics: Authors in context.

Daniel Defoe Thomas Keymer and co-annotator James Kelly. Oxford World's Classics. The introduction ranges widely across literary and historical contexts, from the religious to the post-colonial, with a lively examination of this classic text by a leading scholar. Full notes including new material resulting from recent scholarship

Download books for free. Daniel Defoe's enthralling story-telling and imaginatively detailed descriptions have ensured that his fiction masquerading as fact remains one of the most famous stories in English literature.

Download books for free. On one level a simple adventure story, the novel also raises profound questions about moral and spiritual values, society, and man's abiding acquisitiveness.

by Daniel Defoe & Thomas Keymer. The Life and Adventures of Robinson Crusoe By Daniel Defoe With Illustrations by H. M. Brock London. The Karamazov Brothers (Oxford World's Classics). 67 MB·141,388 Downloads. and the Little Oxford. Dictionary of English. 97 MB·1,271 Downloads·New!. Rights of Man, Common Sense, and Other Political Writings (Oxford World's Classics).

Daniel Defoe, Thomas Keymer.

Robinson Crusoe - Oxford World's Classics. Daniel Defoe, Thomas Keymer (other), James Kelly. Paperback (14 Aug 2008) English. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more. Oxford University Press.

Daniel Defoe's enthralling story-telling and imaginatively detailed descriptions have ensured that his fiction masquerading as fact remains one of the most famous stories in English literature. On one level a simple adventure story, the novel also raises profound questions about moral and spiritual values, society, and man's abiding acquisitiveness. This new edition includes a scintillating Introduction and notes that illuminate the historical context.About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
Comments: (7)
post_name
Our fourteen year old liked the adventure and survival techniques of the island. She said this book reminded her to not give up and be lethargic in your circumstances but to be active in problem solving. She also was encouraged to stand up for those in underprivileged circumstances or in abusive situations and not just be a by stander. She liked there was a lot to take away from this book. She would recommend this book to whoever likes adventure.

Our eleven year old liked the ingenuity of Crusoe when he was stranded on the island. She said it made her think of being creative if she were ever stranded somewhere without the proper resources. She disliked the beginning because she felt it was too slow moving. She would recommend this book because it is a good book and you can learn a lot of stuff, specifically if you feel like you are at an end, keep trying because you can always find a way.

As the mom, I am thankful the book kept both girls engaged. We had many points for discussion throughout the entire book. I would recommend all families with children in middle school and above to read this book aloud as a family. I look forward to reading it again when our younger two are older. (I can't say that about all of the books we read aloud.)
Thabel
I've been working my way through the classics and actually reading all of those old familiars whose plots you know but that you've never actually finished. I have been delighted by how many of those books remain current, exciting and entertaining for young readers. "Treasure Island" and "Kidnapped" are as ripping as you could want. "Robin Hood" is a colorful, savvy, witty and steadfast hero who could have been the model for Aragorn son of Arathorn. Perhaps surprisingly, "Pollyanna" is a tough, earnest, inspirational character without the slightest touch of the lame and sentimental goody-goodiness with which her name has become attached. In the same vein, "Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm" is a take-no-guff pistol. On the other hand, "The Last of the Mohicans" I found to be prolix and almost incomprehensible. "Swiss Family Robinson" was so tediously bland that I cursed the Disney people for saving them from obscurity.

Which brings us to "Robinson Crusoe". While the idea of the castaway more or less originated with and became eternally popular in connection with this book, the book itself is not at all the boys' own, or even stirring, adventure you might expect. Google critical discussions if you like. What you will turn up is very interesting articles about Crusoe as "the Economic Man", or the European colonialist or imperialist, or the radical Protestant. Defoe was a successful businessman and trader in the new economic order of his time, and Crusoe is in many ways a contemplation or examination of what imperialist trade meant culturally, morally, ethically, politically and economically. There are all sorts of paradoxes, inconsistencies, complexities, contradictions and conflicts in how Crusoe approaches moral, ethical, religious and even commercial and entrepreneurial issues throughout this book, and volumes have been written about what Defoe was really getting at in some passages.

So, bottom line, you could teach a college level course just based on this book, and you could spark some fascinating discussions, papers, and points of view. It's offerings are rich and varied. But this is a difficult and demanding read if embraced fully, and not at all the kids shelf actioner the "classic tale" label might suggest.
Brialelis
I read this in high school about 50 years ago and decided to reread this book written about 1712 or so. Once I got past the ancient writing style, I got hooked on the imagery. I thought I recalled the book, but what I recalled was the various Robinson Crusoe movies that I had seen. Needless to say the book is much different than Hollywood's version. For example, Crusoe's faithful friend and servant Friday was not a black African but rather a South American Indian. Reading the book in the original is more difficult because of the very long sentences with punctuation not much in use nowadays. Also, it sends you back to the culture of that time period where slavery, servants, etc. were part of everyday life, and things like blood-letting assumed to work great. I got the free version put together from OCR of the original and a team of volunteers to edit the text, which was great except for a few clunkers. All in all I recommend it as a great read.
Fawrindhga
I had not read "Robinson Crusoe", as a youngster or as required in school. I thought I knew the story, but I was very pleasantly surprised and pleased by every page. With scenes that could have come from, "Two Years Before the Mast", and "Treasure Island", Daniel Defoe weaves a story of magic and experimentation. Our Crusoe is an "old time" MacGyver. I was mesmerized as Crusoe invented useful implements from the ruins of the sunken ship and those things he found on his island. Crusoe's main home and his alternate abode were described with exacting detail. It was as if I was helping him build and bring in his crops The introduction of "Friday" and how he impacted Crusoe was touching and realistically humanitarian. This is not only a story of survival, but one of a man's need to live, love his God, and look for a new tomorrow. I recommend this fine novel to readers starting at middle teens and all adults. There are several other novels that Mr. Defoe has written that follow the further adventures of his Robinson Crusoe. This first original start of "Robinson Crusoe", is a must. Please read and enjoy it, as I have. David G. Parsons.
Olma
I found this story very interesting. I was fascinated by how Crusoe managed to stay alive for all those years, how he at length came in contact with other people, and how he finally got off the island. His convictions are thought-provoking and motivating, and his use of logic and problem-solving skill are very neat to read about--especially keeping in mind how he knew very little of surviving in the wilderness at first. A lot of hard work!!:D