carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Modern Classics: Parade's End (Penguin Modern Classics)

eBook Modern Classics: Parade's End (Penguin Modern Classics) download

by Ford Madox Ford

eBook Modern Classics: Parade's End (Penguin Modern Classics) download ISBN: 0141392193
Author: Ford Madox Ford
Publisher: Penguin Classic; 1st Edition edition (April 15, 2015)
Language: English
Pages: 864
ePub: 1482 kb
Fb2: 1720 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf mobi lrf lit
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Classics

Parade's End. Series: Penguin Modern Classics. Ford Madox Ford (1873-1939) served with the British army in World War I, an experience that was to form the basis of his novel Parade's End, published in four parts from 1924 to 1928

Parade's End. Julian Barnes (Introducer). Ford Madox Ford (1873-1939) served with the British army in World War I, an experience that was to form the basis of his novel Parade's End, published in four parts from 1924 to 1928. He wrote over eighty books, including The Good Soldier (1915), and divided his time between England, France and America.

And that also means constantly redefining and refreshing exactly what makes a ‘classic’. That’s where Modern Classics come in. Since 1961 they have been an organic, ever-growing and ever-evolving list of books that we believe will continue to be read over and over again. They will be summarily deleted.

Parade s End is the great British war novel and Ford Madox Ford s major achievement as a novelist. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

Ford Madox Ford was born on 17 December 1873 in Merton, Devon. His most famous works are The Good Soldier (1915) and Parade’s End (1924–8). He began writing in the 1890s and both his fiction and his criticism are celebrated.

Parade's End by Ford Madox Ford-Incredible book series and tv mini . Booktopia has Great Expectations, Penguin Classics by Charles Dickens.

Parade's End by Ford Madox Ford-Incredible book series and tv mini series. Watch TV shows online. Top Books Read in 2015. Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best novels of all time From the Modern Library’s new set of beautifully repackaged hardcover classics by William Faulkner- The Sound and The Furry by William Faulkner (corrected text). The Dudes on Books book club is reading "The Sound and the Fury" by William Faulkner.

Parade's End. Penguin Classics. series Penguin Modern Classics.

Literary critics see books in this series as important members of the Western canon, though many titles are translated or of non-Western origin; indeed, the series for decades from its creation included only translations, until it eventually incorporated the Penguin English Library imprint in 1986.

Ford Madox Ford, Julian Barnes. Starring Benedict Cumberbatch as Christopher Tietjens, Rebecca Hall as his wife Sylvia and also featuring Rupert Everett, Carey Mulligan, Roger Allam and Miranda Richardson, this lavish production from a screenplay by the legendary playwright Tom Stoppard brings to life for the first time one of the twentieth century's most significant novels.

Booker Prize-winner Julian Barnes introduces Ford Madox Ford's masterpiece Parade's End - now a major new BBC/HBO TV adaptation - in the reissued Penguin Modern Classics edition. Starring Benedict Cumberbatch as Christopher Tietjens, Rebecca Hall as his wife Sylvia and also featuring Rupert Everett, Carey Mulligan, Roger Allam and Miranda Richardson, this lavish production from a screenplay by the legendary playwright Tom Stoppard brings to life for the first time one of the twentieth century's most significant novels. A masterly novel of destruction and regeneration, Parade's End follows the story of aristocrat Christopher Tietjens as his world is shattered by the First World War. Tracing the psychological damage inflicted by battle, the collapse of England's secure Edwardian values - embodied in Christopher's wife, the beautiful, cruel socialite Sylvia - and the beginning of a new age, epitomized by the suffragette Valentine Wannop, Parade's End is an elegy for both the war dead and the passing of a way of life. Ford Madox Ford (1873-1939) served with the British army in World War I, an experience that was to form the basis of his novel Parade's End, published in four parts from 1924 to 1928. He wrote over eighty books, including The Good Soldier (1915), and divided his time between England, France and America. Julian Barnes' most recent novel is The Sense of An Ending, for which he won the 2012 Man Booker prize. His other books include Flaubert's Parrot, A History of the World in 10 1/2 Chapters and Arthur and George. 'The finest English novel about the Great War' Malcolm Bradbury 'The best novel by a British writer ... It is also the finest novel about the First World War. It is also the finest novel about the nature of British society' Anthony Burgess 'There are not many English novels which deserve to be called great: Parade's End is one of them' W.H. Auden 'The English prose masterpiece of the time' William Carlos Williams
Comments: (7)
Flarik
It surpasses all the recenty novels I have read about World War I. It gives a though perspective, not merely a historical one. The characters and the times, their way of looking at a fast-disappearing world are vivid on the page. The literary quality means that you can be transported back into the era without leaving your seat--or searching names and places on your computer. You are a part of the times, and bleed as they bleed. The work is a masterpiece; it reinforces the importance of World War I in our lives. A generation lost, a generation who survive lives in terrible fear. You should not miss this.
Goll
Ford Maddox Ford (1873-1939) the grandson of Ford Maddox Brown the Pre-Raphalite painter was an innovative author in the early decades of the twentieth century. His most famous novels "The Good Soldier" and "Parade's End" have won him literary immortality. "Parade's End" is invariably listed as one of the best one hundred novels of the twentieth century. The huge 906 page tetralogy of four novels covering from 1912 to the postwar World World I has been made a bestseller due to the influential BBC series.
The book deals with such themes as:
a. The passing of the old aristocratic class society of England as manifested in the life of Christopher Tietjens. Tietjens is a rural Tory who has grown up on the vast estate of Groby in the Yorkshire Ridings. Tietjens is infatuated with eighteenth century living but is forced by war and love to enter the mechanized twentieth century of social disorder.
b. The difficulties of married life. Christopher and his wife Sylvia separate. She is amorous, beautiful and unfaithful to the saintly Tietjens. Their one child Mark may have been the son of a man she had an affair with prior to the Tietjens marriage. Sylvia is a cold and calculating woman is loosely based on one of Ford's mistresses Violet Hunt.
c. The huge book evinces the disillusionment and world weariness of the World War I generation. Ford would influence the writings of such authors as Hemingway and other authors of the lost generation.
d. The book is a searingly realistic portrayal of the gritty and tragic warfare experiences oi British troops on the Western front. The petty politics of the officers and the rat like existence of the enlisted men are well drawn by Ford. He was a veteran of combat in France during the war.
e. The book shows us a classic love triange tale. Christopher is loved by both cold Sylvia and the enchanting young Valentine Wollop a virginal, youthful and athletic young lady.
The book is modernistic in its use of flashback and the adroit way the characters reflect on their emotions. Some readers will find this book slow but it will reward careful readers through its close examination of the complex business of human love. It can be very slow moving at times!
Minor characters and upper class British society are well drawn. "Parade's End" is a classic novel by a great writer. It is an essential read for literate English readers. Highly recommended!
Gabar
I quietly observed the hundredth anniversary of the outbreak of The Great War -- which killed 9 million men, shattered the empires of Austria, Russia and Germany while fatally weakening those of England and France, and which destroyed the aristocracy of Britain and feudal systems everywhere – by reading this superb compilation of four great novels. In the first volume of this famous tetralogy, Some Do Not…, the war is looming and then breaks on the scene like an August thunderstorm. We are introduced to the married couple around whom the story revolves: Christopher and Sylvia Tietjens. He is a brilliant up-and-comer in the Treasury, a genius and authority on every subject in the land, the largest brain in every room; she is wealthy, bored, beautiful and possessed of a wicked and merciless tongue. Tietjens is described thus: “His private ambition had always been for saintliness: he must be able to touch pitch and not be defiled. That he knew marked him off as belonging to the sentimental branch of humanity.”

He and his wife have come to loath each other with a plate-throwing hatred that only great sensitivity and great intimacy together can produce. She leaves him and has a long affair with another man, after which he takes her back, so she is bitter and thinks he means her harm: “And she acknowledged that he had a certain right. If, after she had been off with another man, she asked this one still to extend to her the honour of his name and the shelter of his roof, she had no right to object to his terms. Her only decent revenge on him was to live afterwards with such equanimity as to let him know the mortification of failure.” Nice, no? He contemplates an affair with the lovely and intelligent Valentine Wannop, but does not act upon this inclination.

In the second book, No More Parades, Sylvia pursues Tietjens to France and his post in the middle of the war not far from the front. Chaos ensues when she lures men to her bedchamber and tells the Tietjen’s commanding officer, the appalled General Lord Edward Campion, that Tietjens is in fact a crypto-socialist. Meanwhile, the war is raging around them and Tietjen’s is becoming slowly unhinged by the fog of war and Sylvia’s monomania for making him miserable. She confesses to another man that the reason she plagues Tietjens is she loves him so much that she would follow him around the world if he would only throw his handkerchief at her. Campion is beautifully portrayed here as a thoroughly delightful amalgam of preposterous buffoon, poetry-spouting gentleman, shrewd soldier and astute judge of people, and he becomes one of the great literary characters of English military fiction. Meanwhile, Tietjens continues to moon indecisively about his regrettably platonic love for Wannop.

In the third book, Teitjens has been “promoted” to the front lines and is witness to all the carnage and chaos of war. Neither he nor the reader is spared the gory details of the brain-numbing violence. Meanwhile, back at home, Sylvia continues to explore romantic options, but she is jaded: “She was by that time tired of men, or she imagined that she was…Men, at any rate, never fulfilled expectations. They might, upon acquaintance, turn out more entertaining than they appeared; but almost always taking up with a man was like reading a book you had read when you had forgotten that you had read it. You had not been for ten minutes in any sort of intimacy with a man before you said: ‘But I’ve read all this before…’ You knew the opening, you were already bored by the middle, and, especially, you knew the end….” Marvelous. The fourth book is dominated by interior monologues of the principle characters that are little short of brilliant and which tie up all the loose ends of the plot.

One of the charming oddities of this book is Ford’s use of exclamation points, something you do not come upon much in serious novels. He seems to use them ironically, or rather to punctuate an ironic observation, like little signal flares to alert the reader that a sly and ironic effect is intended. Another device worth mentioning is the way the plot advances with a sharp thrust forward of a surprising plot development, and then the author goes back in time a fills in the detail that adds context and meaning to the narrative development. It is done the way military incursions are projected and defended, and it lends this long book a lot of forward momentum but with a narrative stability that is very secure.

It is all very satisfying, but do not for heaven’s sake let your attention wander while reading this book or you will miss a subtlety. Its humor is very sly and, like really good champagne, it is very, very dry. The main story line of this great work – a man of honor trying to do the right thing as well as he can in a mad world of war that is going to hell in a hand-basket all around him, with comedy, love, loss, bitterness and redemption all rolled into the great human experience – is the same DNA that you can read in the two other magisterial serials of the 20 Century, Evelyn Waugh’s Sword of Honour trilogy and Anthony Powell’s A Dance to the Music of Time. In fact, what a great thing it would be to read all three of them in one go (perhaps on a very long sea voyage); you would have a pretty spectacular sampling of Englishnesss in the 20th Century.
White_Nigga
In some novels, the plot sucks you in and you just have to figure out how it all ends. In others, the author carefully makes an argument about human nature and explores it in a fairly satisfying manner. This book does neither of those things, instead, Ford gives you the opportunity to spend 900 odd pages in the the company of some extraordinarily lovable characters who've made a real bungle of their lives. He gives you piercingly clear insight into how they see their world (England, before and after WW1) and each other. You might think that their views are entirely wrong, and you'll almost certainly think that they should have made some of their decisions differently, but it's a treat to be able to spend so much time inside their fascinating minds. Ford isn't interested in being a Tolstoy with some well developed theory of how one ought to live, instead he presents a number of possible systems and shows how they're all fatally flawed. This isn't the sort of thing that appeals to everyone, but it's up there with my favorite novels of all time.