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by Stephen Vizinczey

eBook An Innocent Millionaire (Phoenix Fiction) download ISBN: 0226858898
Author: Stephen Vizinczey
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press (November 15, 1990)
Language: English
Pages: 380
ePub: 1265 kb
Fb2: 1849 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: txt doc mobi rtf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: British and Irish

An Innocent Millionaire" is a bitter book and quite obviously the work of an angry man. Vizinczey gives vent to his hatreds on just about every page of his novel.

An Innocent Millionaire" is a bitter book and quite obviously the work of an angry man. Some of his targets are well-ventilated already: lawyers, taxes, junk culture, greedy corporations, etc. But it is his two main hatreds - women and New York City - that cause him to lose perspective and damage an otherwise rather impressive novel. Vizinczey's dislike of women leaps from every page of this book. Most of the women in his story are just the tools of the rich men in their lives.

An Innocent Millionaire book. An Innocent Millionaire (Phoenix Fiction Series)

An Innocent Millionaire book. Brilliantly inventive, written with great flair and shows. An Innocent Millionaire (Phoenix Fiction Series). 0226858898 (ISBN13: 9780226858890). Vizinczey has also written two books of literary, philosophical and political essays: 'The Rules of Chaos' (1969) and 'Truth and Lies in Literature' (1985). Books by Stephen Vizinczey.

Stephen Vizinczey's AN INNOCENT MILLIONAIRE (University of Chicago Press) has all that: Boy meets Girl, Boy . An Innocent Millionaire is a book full of ideas and concepts, with brilliant dialogues that are not only meant to sustain actions

Stephen Vizinczey's AN INNOCENT MILLIONAIRE (University of Chicago Press) has all that: Boy meets Girl, Boy loses Girl, Boy gets Girl. But the gripping and sometimes graphic love story is secondary to the hero's struggles with the world, with society, with the Tolstoyan conundrum of 'how to live'. Having just finished re-reading AN INNOCENT MILLIONAIRE, it's hard not to proclaim its greatness and wonder why it's not more widely discussed and celebrated. An Innocent Millionaire is a book full of ideas and concepts, with brilliant dialogues that are not only meant to sustain actions. Perhaps this is the reason that MGM is taking so long to make the film.

The virtues of style are those he finds in Hungarian poetry: the moody ferocity of a locked-up beast, and also a classic clarity and complete lack of self-indulgence. -Thomas D'Evelyn, Christian Science Monitor

The virtues of style are those he finds in Hungarian poetry: the moody ferocity of a locked-up beast, and also a classic clarity and complete lack of self-indulgence. -Thomas D'Evelyn, Christian Science Monitor. Shows where the true values lie-not in wealth or the rule of law but in that as yet inviolate sector where a man and woman make love.

First published in 1983, An Innocent Millionaire tells the story of Mark Niven, the son of an American actor who makes an uncertain living in Europe. Mankind, we are told, is divided into the haves and the havenots, but there are those who both have the goods and do not and they live the tensest lives. Vizinczey has written two books of literary, philosophical and political essays: The Rules of Chaos (1969) and Truth and Lies in Literature (1985).

Item Information:Author : Stephen Vizinczey. Product Information:TITLE: An Innocent Millionaire. Place of Publication. General & Literary Fiction. Other Details:Condition : Acceptable.

An innocent millionaire. by. Vizinczey, Stephen, 1933-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Boston : Atlantic Monthly Press. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Sanderia on March 25, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

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New quote from my book "An Innocent Millionaire".

New quote from my book "An Innocent Millionaire".

The ""innocent millionaire"" is young Mark Niven-whose lifelong quest for buried treasure generates adventure, sex, love, vast wealth, and highly engaging storytelling. until everything (including the increasingly contrived, heavy-handed novel) turns sour. Son of a struggling, wandering actor, . born Mark grows up entirely in Europe, getting a ar look at life's freer things: art, luxury, elegance. So, especially after his parents' divorce, teenager Mark buries himself in fantasies of finding the treasure-laden ship Flora, which went down.

"Brilliantly inventive, written with great flair and shows a deliciously comic and ironic sense of American realities."—Alfred Kazin"The virtues of [Vizinczey's] style are those he finds in Hungarian poetry: the moody ferocity of a locked-up beast, and also a classic clarity and complete lack of self-indulgence."—Thomas D'Evelyn, Christian Science Monitor "Shows where the true values lie—not in wealth or the rule of law but in that as yet inviolate sector where a man and woman make love. . . . I was entertained but also deeply moved: here is a novel set bang in the middle of our decadent, polluted, corrupt world that, in some curious way, breathes a kind of desperate hope."—Anthony Burgess, Punch (London)"Bravo!"—Graham Greene
Comments: (7)
Brol
Powerful book that speaks truth about life, dreams, ambitions... in league with works like Idiot from Dostoevsky or 100 years of solitude from Marquez. If you think about yourself as book lover, you'll definitely want to read it.

I also highly recommend other works from Mr. Vizinczey (just finished reading 'In Praise of Older Women'... his work definitely deserves more exposure)!
Realistic
I spent the first part of this book-- the pre-scum part-- baffled by the accolades emblazoned within the first few pages of my copy. Graham Greene is even quoted, calling this comic novel serious business, and can he, an esteemed author, not know what he's talking about? But then as the scumbags kept coming I couldn't help being impressed by Vizinczey's understanding of the ways of the world, particularly of how evil operates in the world. If you've ever had dealings with scum you'll recognize the dead-on observations on the workings of their mind (their "logic", if you will), and the machinations that then follow.

I still think the writing is not the best; never been a fan of the simplified, unsubtle, fairy story style. I also found that sometimes the didactic, wise man author commentary could be pretentious. When it worked, though, it worked really well-- I've got the copied-out quotes to prove it! I'll leave you with one, for all the lawyers out there (nothing but love): "To state a lie firmly, categorically and with great authority, undeterred by the fact that all concerned know it to be a lie, is one of the principal activities defined by the term 'practising law'."
Dibei
I read this book some years ago, and was delighted to discover that it's back in print.
Following is a review from the New York Times, June 16, 1985 by Sam Tanenhaus:
The second novel by the author of "In Praise of Older Women" is a rare accomplishment, a contemporary adventure told with style, wit and wisdom.
Like many unworldly questers, Mark Niven, the protagonist of "An Innocent Millionaire," is not so much innocent as obsessed -- with a treasure ship sunk off the Bahamas in 1820 and still missing in the 1960's when much of this picaresque narrative takes place. Shepherded through Europe by his father, an itinerant movie extra, Mark spends his adolescence in maritime archives, methodically pinpointing the watery grave of the Flora. He closes in on the booty by landing a job at a glamorous Bahamian resort where he develops a second idee fixe -- Marianne Hardwick, the lonely wife of a philandering tycoon. Prodigious happiness seems within his grasp, but this latter-day romantic, isolated so long by his single-minded pursuit, can't scent the encroachment of treachery and corruption as a crooked art dealer, a gangster, a greedy attorney and other rogues seize the stage with Dickensian gusto.
Even more delightful is the author's vividly epigrammatic prose. Paying tribute to youthful imagination, he notes that "a child's dreams are not idle fancies, they are the means by which he creates the person he is going to become." Later, when the hero overcomes a fit of gloom, we're reminded that "decent people are often saved from the extremes of self-pity by pangs of bad conscience." Stephen Vizinczey's attempts to sum up an era yield fewer insights. The 1960's backdrop is curiously sanitized, despite an abundance of topical material -- including an improbable campus demonstration -- and his satire of corporate cupidity suffers from overkill. Still, this is a delicious entertainment that towers above most commercial fiction.
Skyway
"No doubt eliminating politeness from society is a cost-effective way of hastening the day when people will bite each other in the street." ("An Innocent Millionaire", pg 56.)
"For whether people are good or bad, useful or harmful, depends not on their moral principles or even their conscious aims, but on the strength of their imagination." ("An Innocent Millionaire", pg. 75.)
Apart from my gut feeling that Mr. Vizinczey's various remarks on the value of "imagination", scattered throughout his books, may be the sole contemporary sane approach to the murders in Littleton, Co., I want to offer an observation. A term deserves to be coined, (Though, at the same time, I ask for your forgiveness for my ignorant appropriation of a Hungarian surname). I'll call it, "The Vizinczian Paradox"
It goes something like this: "Perhaps, the most quotable author of our century also happens to be our century's greatest advocate of the literary fact that most important truths are learned 'on the way', (meaning: by a character's actions in a novel, not by words.).
In some small way, I hope this might entice you to explore the works of this singular literary genius.