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eBook The Red Badge of Courage: Stephen Crane's Novel of the Civil War: An Historically download

by Charles J. Larocca,Stephen Crane

eBook The Red Badge of Courage: Stephen Crane's Novel of the Civil War: An Historically download ISBN: 0935796681
Author: Charles J. Larocca,Stephen Crane
Publisher: Purple Mountain Pr Ltd; An historically annotated ed edition (December 1, 1995)
Language: English
Pages: 212
ePub: 1496 kb
Fb2: 1903 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: rtf lrf txt azw
Category: Literature

Readers who are into historical war novels will definitely have a great time reading this book Most critics praise this novel because of the very realistic way in which Crane was able to describe all the battle scenes in the story

Readers who are into historical war novels will definitely have a great time reading this book. Although it’s a work of fiction, its contents are very realistic and accurate. This is very important especially for a story with a historical setting. Most critics praise this novel because of the very realistic way in which Crane was able to describe all the battle scenes in the story. He was born after the Civil War and had not even experienced a fight in any war.

Stephen Crane's classic 1895 Civil War novel continues to be read, studied, and discussed .

Stephen Crane's classic 1895 Civil War novel continues to be read, studied, and discussed, generation after generation. Its searing images of war, destruction, and fear endure in the collective American mind. Frederick C. Crews, Donald Pizer, Stephen Crane, Jay Martin, John Higham, Charles J. LaRocca, Harold R. Hungerford, Perry Lentz, Eric Solomon, and J. C. Levenson provide the framework for understanding the novel as both literature and history.

Librivox recording of The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane. This is a short novel published in 1895 and based vaguely on the battle of Chancellorsville of the American Civil War.

Librivox recording of The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane I ask only once a year: please help the Internet Archive today.

Throughout this story, Crane has attempted to appeal the senses of the reader. Give 3 examples, of sight - sound - smell - which reflect this sensory style. What is the message being delivered by Crane through the youth, and the narrative? 2. The sentence structure and vocabulary throughout this novel will, in many cases, be new to readers. Describe, with reference only to this chapter, how sentence structure varies differently from that which a more modern audience might be used to, and give examples of 5 words or phrases with contextual meaning, again only from this chapter.

Stephen Crane authored novels, short stories, and poetry, but is best known for his realistic war fiction. Crane was a correspondent in the Greek-Turkish War and the Spanish American War, penning numerous articles, war reports and sketches

Stephen Crane authored novels, short stories, and poetry, but is best known for his realistic war fiction. Crane was a correspondent in the Greek-Turkish War and the Spanish American War, penning numerous articles, war reports and sketches. His most famous work, The Red Badge of Courage (1896), portrays the initial cowardice and later courage of a Union soldier in the Civil War. In addition to six novels, Crane wrote over a hundred short stories including "The Blue Hotel," "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky," and "The Open Boat.

Asserting that Crane’s masterpiece was based on the 124th New York Infantry’s experience in the Battle of Chancellorsville, LaRocca draws parallels, page by page, between the actual and fictional events. Today in History: Born on January 5. 1779. Stephen Decatur, American naval hero during actions against the Barbay pirates and the War of 1812. Conrad Adenauer, first chancellor of post-World War II West Germany. Walter Mondale, 42nd Vice President of the United States, Democratic presidential nominee who lost to Ronald Reagan in 1984, and Ambassador to Japan.

Although Stephen Crane was born after the war and never participated in battle himself, he was highly praised by the Civil War .

Although Stephen Crane was born after the war and never participated in battle himself, he was highly praised by the Civil War veterans for having capture a realistic impression of their actual battlefield experiences and emotions. The Red Badge of Courage treats with the meaning. Considered one of the most influential war stories every written, The Red Badge of Courage was published in 1895, a full thirty years after the American Civil War had ended.

The setting is the Civil War...the hero is Henry Flemming, who, swept up in the current of events, joins the Union Army. He plunges heedlessly into battle, at first loses his courage, then later regains it for the crucial confrontation. One of the most realistic war stories ever written, THE RED BADGE OF COURAGE gives a striking depiction of how soldiers behave under fire.

Three other fine examples of realistic fiction are "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky," "The Blue Hotel," and "The Open Boat."

Comments: (7)
Porgisk
It took me a while to get into the story because I had been reading so many modern novels lately, but once I did, it became a glorious and horrific wonder for my imagination. The story spelled out the inner workings of a mind on the battlefield in ways I haven't encountered in other novels. After chapter 3 I was captivated! I fully and heartily recommend pressing through if the beginning seems a bit stilted to you. The ending left this reader satisfied, not as if there's some happily ever after, but because there is some gleaming of hope even in the bitter horrors of combat. Crane captures the full gamut quite well.
Quellik
An extraordinary book for its time, Stephen Crane describes the intimate details and the innermost thoughts of a newly minted soldier on the front lines of a Civil War battlefield. With bullets whizzing about him, and thick smoke and corpses as a backdrop, Henry flees his first encounter with battle. As he wanders about in the aftermath, he struggles with his shame and seeks rationalizations for his cowardice. Was he not the wiser for having fled a battle that was lost? Does not an animal flee a predator when sensing the predator is a superior force? But then Henry discovers that his battalion actually won the battle, and he returns to it after suffering a rather ignominious wound. But his comrades assume he was shot in the head and consider him a hero. Henry is transformed and goes on to fight courageously, earning the admiration of his comrades.

I find Crane's writing choppy and stilted. But it is perhaps this writing style that adds a sense of realism to his novel. The young Crane, who never saw battle and was writing more than a decade after the end of the Civil War, displays an astonishing talent for introspection. He creates with Henry Fleming a timeless protagonist in a coming of age novel that remains an American classic.
Cktiell
This novel is the fictionalized story of a young man who enlists in the Federal Army in the midst of the American Civil War (1860-1865). The boys illusions about himself and warfare are shattered during his first battle as he runs from battle in fear for his life. The story recounts his struggle to come to grips with himself in order to overcoming his fears and redeem himself through heroic actions during a subsequent battle. Despite the fact the author never experienced combat I believe that the battle descriptions serve as a bench marks for all war novels.

This book was a exceptional read, a true example of the great "Classic American Novel", truly one of the top 100 novels ever written. I read it once before, while in high school, as part of an assignment designed to teach students about great novels. I recall enjoying the experience, but by no measure did I really understand how remarkable, how eloquent a testemant to letters and reading this book trully stands. I think my improved understanding of this book comes from my many years of life experiences, includiing my years as a warrior, coupled by the many years of reading I've completed. The author's beautifule prose, the narrative, the pacing of the story, the author's ability to capture the humanity of characters, all of these factors and more have created this masterpiece. Almost everyone would enjoy reading this book! It is not simply a war story, it is a story about growing up, and facing whatever life throws at you.
Dammy
I purchased this for my husband after an episode of "Boardwalk Empire" where a character has a dream sequence and appears to be dying (we don't know if he is/does).
I asked if he (my husband) had ever read this story and he didn't know what I was talking about.
This book was required reading for me in high school (1994-95) and I LOVED it.

Many people in their reviews talk about the characters, plot, etc so I won't do that.

I will say that when this book arrived it was in great condition, brand new.

HOWEVER!! The print is SO TINY! If you are purchasing this for an older person I would recommend trying to find an edition that has larger font or maybe a Kindle edition so that the reader can enlarge the words.
Ndav
I first read this book when I was 12 years old, many years ago, and I remember that it was one of my favorites in those days. But I didn't remember much beyond that, so I decided to read it again.

This classic was written in a style you don't see in American literature any more; a very descriptive book with elegant language, typical of 19th century writing. It is the story of an 18-year old young man who joined the Union Army and fought in the Civil War. Much of the story is about the feelings of this boy turning into a man in the harshest way, so there is not as much action as you would expect from a book written today. The book is about Henry Fleming's experiences in one particular battle, the first fighting for the 304th Infantry Regiment. In the battle, it is about what he sees and how he feels during the fight, rather than who is winning or losing, and how Henry changed from the first attack until the end of the battle, when they were marching away from the battlefield.

I found this look at how the young men who fought that war felt about the experience to be realistic and very interesting. But if you are looking for a guts and glory book about fighting and winning and heroic deeds, you may not enjoy this one.
Peles
Stephen Crane. What bad is there to say about him? Sure, he never went to war - but that does not detract from the visceral experience one has in reading this work. Plus, Crane had a really wacky way of phrasing sentences which is inescapably modern. I read this novel over and over again. In this edition, it is 100 pages long. There is also Frank Norris' hilarious send-up of Stephen Crane's style and some other English-professor commentary. This is indispensable reading for anyone trying to understand war.