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eBook Modern Classics Famous Last Words download

by Timothy Findley

eBook Modern Classics Famous Last Words download ISBN: 0143051415
Author: Timothy Findley
Publisher: Penguin Books (January 1, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 392
ePub: 1359 kb
Fb2: 1490 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: azw doc rtf lit
Category: Literature

Timothy Findley (1930-2002) was one of Canada's most compelling and best-loved writers.

Timothy Findley (1930-2002) was one of Canada's most compelling and best-loved writers. He is the author of The Wars, which won the Governor General's Award and established him as one of Canada's leading writers, as well as Pilgrim and The Piano Man's Daughter, both finalists for The Giller Prize. All the Findlay elements are here in this novel: intrigue, mystery, psycho-analysis, and moral ambiguity.

and i found it both intriguing and suspenseful. Recommended for the interesting writing style, the "possible" story line, and the suspense.

Famous Last Words book. you can tell he was an actor also because that kind of a theatrical sense comes through in his writing

Famous Last Words book. In the final days of the Second World War, Hugh Selwyn Mauberley. you can tell he was an actor also because that kind of a theatrical sense comes through in his writing. Loved this book, so if you get a chance to read it, you should.

Fascinated but horrified, they learn of a dazzling array of characters caught up in scandal and political corruption. The exiled Duke and Duchess of Windsor, von Ribbentrop, Hitler, Charles Lindbergh, Sir Harry Oakes-all play sinister parts in an elaborate scheme to secure world.

Famous Last Words is a 1981 novel by Canadian author Timothy Findley, in which Hugh Selwyn Mauberley (originally from the Ezra Pound poem of the same name) is the main character. In the book Findley poses a few ideas involving the flight of Rudolf Hess into Scotland.

The Last of the Crazy People. The Butterfly Plague. Not Wanted on the Voyage.

Also by Timothy Findley. The Last of the Crazy People. The Piano Man’s Daughter.

Eat, she said to her son. You must. And she handed him the plate, which he could only stare at and put in his lap because it seemed ungrateful to hand it back to her. w that she was looking at him strangely, as from another time. It was perhaps the afternoon light that caused this effect and the gentle, silent rain that misted the windows

Timothy Findley was born in 1930. In 1981 Famous Last Words was published. This fictionalization of Hugh Selwyn Mauberley by Ezra Pound, a work that was already a "fictional fact," examines fascism.

Timothy Findley was born in 1930. A native of Toronto, Canada, novelist and playwright Timothy Findley initially embarked upon an acting career. Findley worked for the Canadian Stratford Festival and later, after study at London's Central School of Speech and Drama, he toured Britain, Europe, and the United States as a contract player. While performing in The Matchmaker by Thornton Wilder, Findley was encouraged by the playwright to write fiction.

ISBN 10: 057120905X ISBN 13: 9780571209057. Publisher: Gardners Books, 2001.

Famous Last Words Timothy Findley. 19 people like this topic. Want to like this page?

Famous Last Words Timothy Findley.

In the final days of the Second World War, Hugh Selwyn Mauberley scrawls his desperate account on the walls and ceilings of his ice-cold prison high in the Austrian Alps. Officers of the liberating army discover his frozen, disfigured corpse and his astonishing testament—the sordid truth that he alone possessed. Fascinated but horrified, they learn of a dazzling array of characters caught up in scandal and political corruption. The exiled Duke and Duchess of Windsor, von Ribbentrop, Hitler, Charles Lindbergh, Sir Harry Oakes—all play sinister parts in an elaborate scheme to secure world domination.
Comments: (7)
Samugul
this book was my first by Timothy Findley...and i found it both intriguing and suspenseful. it was a historical fiction....page-turner. Recommended for the interesting writing style, the "possible" story line, and the suspense.
Doomblade
Absolutely fantastic text with a bewitching story. One of the best books I have ever read, which incidentally makes sense of historical anomolies that otherwise might not gel.
Blackseeker
Boring, start to..... page 50
Lilegha
"Famous Last Words" is decidedly a minor novel, but it may be worth an hour or two of your time., if you're interested in pre-World War II aristocratic Europe. Characters include Von Ribbentrop, the creepy Foreign Minister of Nazi Germany, Walter Schellenberg, a creepy SS official, Elsa Maxwell, a creepy society columnist, and the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, creepy parasites. It's a cast of characters that will have you longing for the delightful, natural joyfulness of Darth Vader.
Cerana
To begin with, every reader of this book should first read the poem "Hugh Selwyn Mauberly" by Ezra Pound, since this fictional persona of Pound's ends up being the central character of this fascinating book. The book works mainly on two levels: 1.) That of the intrigues, relationships and a certain "cabal" surrounding the rise of the Fascists and Nazis to power and their eventual defeat, all plausible (I did some research), and historically based, which makes the book the page-turner that it is. 2.) The embedded questionings of human motivations and actions and meditation-provoking sections futher calling into question what ultimately comprises history.
This second aspect is what makes the book more than just your average historical thriller. Findley has a fine manner of putting events into a poetic, philosophical cast. - But the book meanders a bit much, and somehow lacks a certain panache and poetic/philosophical heft that detracts from its effectiveness- Perhaps this is inevitable in a book that weaves in and out of so many different intrigues, betrayals and deceptions while at the same time employing a prose style that is downright contemplative at times. In other words, the two levels don't quite seem to mesh as they should.
Aside from a little muddlednesss, however, this is a very fine piece of literature. It will having you turning the pages in excited bewilderment while at the same time pondering the questions it provokes about mankind and history.
There is an intriguing passage in the middle of Mauberly's narrative where he imagines a future historian, a "dread academic, much too careful of his research" who will completely botch things in his account of these times "because he will not acknowledge that history is made in the electric moment, and its flowering is all in chance....There is more in history of impulse than we dare to know."---So, can a "true" history be written after all? Or does a fictional account, such as this book containing a narrative written by a fictional character, have the famous last words?
Morlunn
Crisply written, suspensfull, and with a cast from the pages of 20th centuary history,
"Famous Last Words" is a towering achievement in storytelling.

Set in World War II, the novel follows the exploits of writer Hugh Selwyn Mauberly, a character Findlay has drawn from the
poems of one of this novels secondary characters, Ezra Pound. Yes, That's right, I said secondary characters. The novel,
which examines the curious attraction of Germany to all symbols English spends much more time on the comings and goings of some other
pretty important folk, like German Foriegn Minister Von Ribbentrop, or the real murdered British diplomat Sir Harry Oakes.
Looming large throughout the novel, is the character of the Duchess of Windsor, known forever as Mrs. Simpson.

"Famous Last Words" tells of Mauberly's romantic obsession with Mrs. Simpson. It also proposes the shocking theory that the Nazi's
under Hitler had a unique and unhealthy obsession of its own involving Mrs Simpson and her brurned out hulk of a former king,
Edward VIII.

Along the way, Findlay masterfully weaves real history with gripping fiction making for a book that facsinates and teaches.
Withn "Famous Last Words" Findlay takes his place amoung the best of his countrymen, including fellow Canadians, Robertson Davis
and Margaret Atwood.
ᵀᴴᴱ ᴼᴿᴵᴳᴵᴻᴬᴸ
Interesting that The Wars deals with the First World War and one man's personal transformation both before the war and during it. Famous Last Words, in a sense, picks up where the other novel left off. While the author's fictional protagonist/antagonist Mauberly is the inadvertent co-narrator of the story, the novel really focuses on varying characters and motives both during and after the Second World War.
The most intriguing part of this novel is the discovery of Mauberly's writings on the walls of a European hotel room and the impending decisions to be made about its historical importance. American soldiers have to decide whether to preserve the historical narrative written by a questionable character or destroy all memory--artistic or otherwise--of a gruesome war.
One gets the sense that Findley is making a post-modern comment on the myth of truth-telling and the conflict between art and politics. But also, the irony of Findlay as storyteller commenting on the subjectivity of storytelling is not lost.
All the Findlay elements are here in this novel: intrigue, mystery, psycho-analysis, and moral ambiguity. It does not have the power or punch of The Wars, but it is a confusingly fascinating read.