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eBook Tinsel download

by William Goldman

eBook Tinsel download ISBN: 0333270320
Author: William Goldman
Publisher: Macmillan & Co Limited; Book Club (BCE/BOMC) edition (1979)
Language: English
Pages: 352
ePub: 1296 kb
Fb2: 1692 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: lrf docx mobi lit
Category: Literature

William Goldman (August 12, 1931 – November 16, 2018) was an American novelist, playwright, and screenwriter. He first came to prominence in the 1950s as a novelist before turning to screenwriting.

William Goldman (August 12, 1931 – November 16, 2018) was an American novelist, playwright, and screenwriter. He won Academy Awards for his screenplays Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and All the President's Men (1976). His other works include his thriller novel Marathon Man and comedy/fantasy novel The Princess Bride, both of which he adapted for the film versions.

William Goldman In Boys and Girls Together, author William Goldman offers a beautiful tale of early adulthood inspired by hi. .

Three novels from a multiple Academy Award winner and the New York Times–bestselling author of The Princess Bride. In Boys and Girls Together, author William Goldman offers a beautiful tale of early adulthood inspired by his own experiences. Five friends-all young, creative, ambitious, and troubled-make their way to New York City to pursue their dreams. Together they struggle, fight, love, make art, and face the hard truths of life.

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William Goldman, who holds two Academy Awards for his screenwriting ( Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and All the President's Men ), and is author of the perennial best seller Adventures in the Screen Trade, scrutinizes the Hollywood. In this belated sequel to Marathon Man Goldman jumps several years into the future of the Levy brothers. Thomas is now a history professor at Columbia, and Scylla, the lethal secret agent left for dead in New York's Lincoln Center, has been restored and r.

William Goldman is an Academy Award–winning author of screenplays, plays .

William Goldman is an Academy Award–winning author of screenplays, plays, memoirs, and novels. Goldman, who twice won screenwriting Oscars for All The President’s Men and Butch Cass. PDATED: I have been informed by friends of the family that William Goldman died last night. He was 87. illiam Goldman.

William Goldman's "Tinsel" is a story of Hollywood and the curious and often vulnerable personalities involved in the movie business. As a longtime William Goldman fan, I went into this book expecting to like it. Its framing device is the casting of a new movie about the life and death of a sex symbol, loosely based on Marilyn Monroe. We meet the money and creative people behind the movie and the various starlets hoping for a shot at the incredibly juicy role. I loved it. Tinsel details the making of a movie; like most of Goldman's books, it's not the story he tells (although it's a fabulous plot) but the way he tells it.

by. Goldman, William, 1931-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Motion picture industry. New York : Delacorte Press. Uploaded by AliciaDA on January 5, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Tinsel is a 1979 novel written by William Goldman. Goldman said in a 1979 interview that he was motivated to write the novel to explore the treatment of women in Hollywood

Tinsel is a 1979 novel written by William Goldman. It was the third of a four-book deal he had with Delacorte Press after Marathon Man and Magic. He called it "my Hollywood novel" Goldman said in a 1979 interview that he was motivated to write the novel to explore the treatment of women in Hollywood: There are a couple of basic truths about this town. One is that nobody knows anything about what will work.

Comments: (6)
Fhois
Tragic, like about all Goldman booms. Loved the characters tho.
Der Bat
A novel I read years ago by a talented story teller. An insightful look at the mixture of people inhabiting
a California I remember so well. But what would you expect from the screenwriter of "Butch Cassidy
and The Sundance Kid".
Global Progression
GREAT fictional book about producer/director Julian Garvey who makes popular movies. They make money but he dissatisfied. He wants to make an art film. He gets hold of a script called "Tinsel' and it's fantastic. Problem is it calls for a female lead who has no problem being nude a lot. There are three women who want it--Dixie, "Pig" and Ginger. The book deals with their back stories, how they know Garvey and why they want the role. It ends tragically but realistically/ Great book. It moves like lightning and has wonderful hysterical dialogue (mostly from Garvey). Since this was written (and takes place) in the late 1970s it does help to have a good knowledge of who was big back then and the movies they made. Well woth reading.
invasion
Tinsel isn't saying anything new about Hollywood-- not even for the time in which it was written-- but what it does say it says extremely well (to echo another reviewer.) Nor is the plot in any way remarkable; that plot being the casting of a film. What matters is that as a vehicle to explore certain themes it more than suffices. Dark, funny, incisive. Yes.

If you're done reading this book and want more of the same, I recommend trying Herbert Kastle's The Moviemaker and/or Dirty Movies (also known as Ladies of the Valley).
Lavivan
By far, the most (and only) fascinating female character in this Hollywood novel, published about 30 years ago if my memory serves, is not one of the three beautiful former starlets who are desperate to make a grand comeback--or intro--in a blockbuster movie based on Marilyn Monroe's suicide. Rather, it's Estelle Garvey, the unattractive, middle-aged, brilliant, and very street-smart wife of the producer, who manages to bring her straying husband to his knees for his own good through clever manipulation using his many infidelities of decades. Estelle is the only woman in the novel whom I respected.

As for the rest, Ginger was a rich, self-absorbed, spoiled brat, Dixie was just plain stupid, and poor "Pig" was an industrial-strength codependent who needed professional help big-time for her zero self-esteem. (So did Dixie, for that matter.)

A fabulous, fascinating novel, and I must admit, I read it to death!
Onetarieva
William Goldman's "Tinsel" is a story of Hollywood and the curious and often vulnerable personalities involved in the movie business. Its framing device is the casting of a new movie about the life and death of a sex symbol, loosely based on Marilyn Monroe. We meet the money and creative people behind the movie and the various starlets hoping for a shot at the incredibly juicy role. As usual with a William Goldman novel, we are privy to the thoughts of the various characters and, as usual, there are surprises along the way. But the best thing about the novel is the feeling of Hollywood that it manages to convey, the blend of sordidness and glamour, the money and egos involved in each film, and the terrible attraction that a starmaking role has for actors and actresses. Many authors have tried to bring Hollywood to life in their novels, but few have succeeded as well as Goldman has with "Tinsel."