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eBook The Loving Spirit download

by Dame Du Maurier Daphne,Gene Szafran

eBook The Loving Spirit download ISBN: 0380013371
Author: Dame Du Maurier Daphne,Gene Szafran
Publisher: Avon Books (July 1, 1982)
Language: English
ePub: 1544 kb
Fb2: 1964 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lit doc mobi txt
Category: Literature

Daphne du Maurier's 1938 novel Rebecca made her one of the most successful writers of her time.

Daphne du Maurier's 1938 novel Rebecca made her one of the most successful writers of her time. Alfred Hitchcock's adaptation of the book won the Best Picture Oscar in 1940. He later used her material for The Birds. a societal whirlwind as destructive to families and culture as any war. In some respects, it reminds me of Thomas Mann's "Buddenbrooks," but with more heart and passion than Mann would ever demonstrate.

DAPHNE DU MAURIER (1907-89) was born in London, the daughter of the famous actor-manager Sir Gerald du Maurier and granddaughter of George du. .The Rebecca Notebook.

DAPHNE DU MAURIER (1907-89) was born in London, the daughter of the famous actor-manager Sir Gerald du Maurier and granddaughter of George du Maurier, the author and artist. A voracious reader, she was from an early age fascinated by imaginary worlds and even created a male alter ego for herself. Educated at home with her sisters and later in Paris, she began writing short stories and articles in 1928, and in 1931 her first novel, The Loving Spirit, was published. Published by Hachette Digital 2010.

The movement of the ship was changed, and she frisked along now like a mad spirit, kicking her heels at the weather astern. Joseph wanted to see his boy beside him and hear his glad shout of delight. He went to the head of the companionway and yelled to his son.

Dame Daphne du Maurier, Lady Browning, DBE (/duː ˈmɒrieɪ/; 13 May 1907 – 19 April 1989) was an English author and playwright. Although she is classed as a romantic novelist, her stories have been described as "moody and resonant" with overtones of the paranormal. Her bestselling works were not at first taken seriously by critics, but have since earned an enduring reputation for narrative craft.

The Loving Spirit book. Recently I came across a documentary of Daphne Du Maurier called ‘The make believe world of Daphne Du Maurier’ where she says that she always believed that she lived in a world of make believe. This romance is Daphne du Maurier's first novel. To her, Cornwall where she was born was alive with things and characters that didn’t exist. And something about the way she describes Plyn that made the magical realism seem to almost come alive for me.

Daphne du Maurier (1907-89) was born in London, the daughter of the famous actor-manager Sir Gerald du Maurier . In 1931 her first novel, The Loving Spirit, was published. A biography of her father and three other novels followed, but it was the novel Rebecca that launched her into the literary stratosphere and made her one of the most popular authors of her day. In 1932, du Maurier married Major Frederick Browning, with whom she had three children.

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In this haunting tale, Daphne du Maurier takes a fresh approach to time travel. A secret experimental concoction, once imbibed, allows you to return to the fourteenth century

In this haunting tale, Daphne du Maurier takes a fresh approach to time travel. A secret experimental concoction, once imbibed, allows you to return to the fourteenth century. There is only one catch: if you happen to touch anyone while traveling in the past you will be thrust instantaneously to the present.

Daphne du Maurier, Michele Roberts. But constrained by the times, instead she marries her cousin Thomas, a boat builder, and settles down to raise a family. Janet's loving spirit - the passionate yearning for adventure and for love - is passed down to her son, and through him to his children's children. As generations of the family struggle against hardship and loss, their intricately plotted history is set against the.

Comments: (6)
Dark_Sun
It all begins in Plyn, Cornwall, 1830. Janet Coombe is a free spirit. Sometimes she feels she should have been a boy. She loves boats and the sea, and dreams of being a traveler and adventurer. A perfect day for her entails running about the countryside with her skirt hiked up to her knees. But since she is born female, things are expected from her. So she marries her cousin Thomas, a boat builder, and gives him children and marital contentment. But as he becomes involved in his family business, Janet begins to wonder if this is all there is to life. She passes her spirited ways on to her son Joseph, and amid family drama, tragedies, changes and some suspense, it is Joseph's granddaughter Jennifer who, with her own free spirit, intends to mend everything and live the life that was once meant for Janet Coombe.

Janet Coombe seems to be the fictionalized version of Daphne du Maurier. In various autobiographies, Du Maurier often said that she wished she had been born a boy, that she'd always been a tomboy and that she lived her fantasies through her male narrators in various novels. This is her first novel, and probably her most autobiographical effort. The Loving Spirit has a wonderful beginning. It kept me turning the pages because the writing is lyrical and sublime, and it engaged me with little effort. It does get a bit tedious somewhere in the middle, and it took me a while to read it at that point. It does, however, pick up when Jennifer's story comes in. It is, in fact, the best part of the novel and I couldn't put it down. Daphne du Maurier is one of my favorite novelists. She wrote a little bit of everything, took risks that paid off. This is a wonderful look at her writing during its beginner state. I have to say this debut is better than most books written by today's experienced authors. And that speaks volumes about today's commercial fiction.
Clandratha
I was unaware that this was Du Maurier's first published novel, I always just thought she wrote the usual 4 or 5 you hear about. I thought this novel was beautiful and haunting. I hated for it to end.
Skunk Black
Lovely tale of a Cornish village by sea and the lives of the fisherman who fished there in the days gone bye.
Macill
"High above the clustered houses and the grey harbour waters of Plyn, the loving spirit smiles and is free."

Although you know I'm not going to tell if that's from the beginning of the book or the end. This first novel of Du Maurier's tells the story of four generations of the Coombe family of Plyn, Cornwall beginning in the early 1800's as young bride Janet Coombe, happy as she is with her children and husband, always longs for the freedom of the sea. Her son Joseph follows his mother's dreams and sets sail in the merchant ship built by the Coombe family and named after his mother - as is her image the figurehead at the prow of the ship. Joseph eventually marries, but his real love is always the sea and when he can no longer sail he takes his bitterness out on his family, which eventually leads to dire changes in their lives.

Joseph's son Christopher, realizing he is not cut out for the sailing life, abandons ship in London and ekes out a living there and marries his landlady's daughter Bertha Parkins. Finally tiring of London life, they return to Plyn in hopes of reuniting with his estranged family and find work in the family's shipbuilding business - although his uncle Phillip's grudge against Joseph continues unabated against his son and forces the grief stricken family to return to London. The book culminates with the story of Christopher's daughter Jennifer as her restless spirit brings her back to Plyn to a chance meeting with a long-lost cousin at the wreck of the Janet Coombe, as well as a show down with her great-uncle Phillip over the damage his hatred has wreaked on the Coombe family.

Throughout the book, the loving spirit of Janet Coombe seems to guide her family through the best and worst times of their lives. As a first book it is certainly good, but far from what readers of her later classics might expect, and a bit slow paced for the most part except the last 50 or so pages - she had me biting my nails for a while there. While I do enjoy family sagas continuing over multiple generations, this one is far from the best either, a bit too short and not as well developed as I like them. I'd recommend this one for fans of Du Maurier wanting to get a look at her first book, but I doubt there's enough here to hold the interest of a more casual reader. 3/5 stars.
wanderpool
I read a serialized version of this in the late 50s in a British women's magazine (Women or Womens Own). It made a huge impression on me, though I was barely a teenager at the time. It spoke directly to my heart about a woman's emotional fulfillment and finding and keeping your own true self (though I could not articulate that at the time). Over the years, I have searched bookstores and thrift shops across America on a quest to find this book. When I located a copy via Amazon it was with fear that I opened and began to read. Would it hold up? Have I become too jaded to defer to my 13 year old taste?
I LOVED it once again.
Bluddefender
Permeated by atmosphere while unfolding the exigencies of life across several generations of a Cornish family; the appeal enhanced by acute observation of the Cornish village which the author draws.