carnevalemanfredonia.it

eBook Skagboys download

by Irvine Welsh

eBook Skagboys download ISBN: 0224087908
Author: Irvine Welsh
Publisher: Jonathan Cape (May 14, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 336
ePub: 1467 kb
Fb2: 1746 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: doc txt lrf lrf
Category: Literature

Before trainspotting came skagboys. The Number One Bestseller.

Before trainspotting came skagboys. Mark Renton has it all: he’s good-looking, young, with a pretty girlfriend and a bright future.

Irvine Welsh is the author of seven previous novels and four books of shorter fiction. Ah dinnae need that much encouragement; the adrenalin’s leaking intae me, buzzing us up. There’s no way ah’m missing this yin. He currently lives in Chicago. Also by irvine welsh. Granny Renton’s up tae see us off; small, white-heided in her quilted dressing gown, but robust and ever-alert, peerin at us ower her glesses, duffel bag in her hand. She gapes at us for a second, makes some kind ay gesture, then she’s off fussing eftir ma dad in the hallway. Ah can hear her soft sing-song voice.

Tell us it’s no true, son, tell us! Ma pleads, standin behind the chair she’d vacated Normal service between us is evidently resumed, so ah openly regard the muppet in sheer fuckin contempt.

Tell us it’s no true, son, tell us! Ma pleads, standin behind the chair she’d vacated. She’s hudin oantae the back ay it, white-knuckled, as if braced for impact. Normal service between us is evidently resumed, so ah openly regard the muppet in sheer fuckin contempt. As opposed tae the mature, sensible and socially cohesive practice ay rammin the nut oan total strangers in public places? Billy looks angry for a beat, but he lets it go as a lenient smile creeps across his coupon.

See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Mark Renton’s life seems to be on track: university.

Skagboys is a 2012 novel by Scottish writer Irvine Welsh. It is a prequel to his 1993 novel Trainspotting, and its 2002 sequel Porno. It follows the earlier lives of characters Renton and Sick Boy as they first descend into heroin addiction

Skagboys is a 2012 novel by Scottish writer Irvine Welsh. It follows the earlier lives of characters Renton and Sick Boy as they first descend into heroin addiction. When Welsh described the novel he said: "I think I’m going to call it Skag Boys: skag is my favourite word for heroin

After the joys of watching T2, I knew it was about time I finally got round to reading Skagboys

After the joys of watching T2, I knew it was about time I finally got round to reading Skagboys. I have struggled to enjoy Irvine Welsh as much as I used to, finding his prose unnecessarily explicit . .t times - a trait I loved when I was younger, but now less so. In places, this is the case with Skagboys, and I would expect no less. Irvine Welsh goes too far - that's what makes his books so popular. However, I enjoyed the story itself more than I thought I would

Irvine Welsh's prequel to Trainspotting just goes over the same old ground, argues Theo Tait. This is a simplification: the desire to shock runs deep in Welsh, and all his books are at least slightly sick and sensationalistic

Irvine Welsh's prequel to Trainspotting just goes over the same old ground, argues Theo Tait. This is a simplification: the desire to shock runs deep in Welsh, and all his books are at least slightly sick and sensationalistic. But when it comes down to brass tacks, Welsh has one great story to tell; and much of the rest of his career has been spent failing to find another one in ever more desperate and revolting ways, apparently feeling that he's letting the side down if there isn't a ng scene or a ruptured penis or child being dismembered. I was really looking forward to Skagboys, which falls clearly into the first category.

Skagboys,’ Irvine Welsh’s ‘Trainspotting’ Prequel. Twenty years ago, Irvine Welsh roared onto the British literary scene with Trainspotting, a first novel that traced the exuberant depravities of Scottish drug fiends. A few years later, the filmmaker Danny Boyle adapted the book for the screen, and a franchise was born.

Mark Renton has it alclass "underline" he’s good-looking, young, with a pretty girlfriend and a place at university. But there’s no room for him in the 1980s. This is the 1980s: a time of drugs, poverty, AIDS, violence, political strife and hatred - but a lot of laughs, and maybe just a little love; a decade which changed Britain for ever.

Both a prequel to the world-renowned Trainspotting, and an alternative version of it, Skagboys is Irvine Welsh's greatest work. Mark Renton seems to have it all: he's the first in his family to go to university, he's young, has a pretty girlfriend and a great social life. But Thatcher's government is destroying working-class communities across Britain, and the post-war certainties of full employment, educational opportunity and a welfare state are gone. When his badly handicapped younger brother dies the family bonds start to weaken, his life flips out of control, and he succumbs to the defeatism and the heroin which has taken hold in Edinburgh's grimmer areas.  His friends face similar challenges. Spud Murphy is paid off from his job and faces long-term unemployment, while Tommy Lawrence feels that only love can save him from being sucked into a life of petty crime and violence -- exemplified respectively by the thieving Matty Connell and psychotic Franco Begbie. And then there is Sick Boy, the supreme manipulator of the opposite sex, scamming and hustling his way through life.  Skagboys charts their journey from likely lads to young men addicted to the heroin which has flooded their disintegrating community. This is the 1980s: not the sanitized version, of upbeat pop music, mullets, shoulder-pads and MTV, but a time of drugs, poverty, AIDS, violence, political strife and hatred -- and maybe just a little love; a decade which changed Britain for ever. The prequel to the world-renowned Trainspotting, this is an exhilarating and moving book, full of the scabrous humour, salty vernacular and appalling behaviour that has made Irvine Welsh a household name.
Comments: (7)
Amerikan_Volga
One of the best books this author has written, it is remarkable in scope, humor, depth of character, the ability to emit the most genuinely skin-crawlyingly disturbing scenes, followed by some of the funniest -- and always written with the unflinching respect of truth. I don't understand how he does it, but as busy as I am, I read this 500-plus page book at every possible free moment, sad now that it's over. And don't be put off by it's overly grim cover -- sorry publisher, but it just doesn't fit the book, in my opinion.
Just as with his other books, Welsh writes with phoenetically-accurate dialogue -- it takes some time to get used to it, and I recommend your first read be a good 50 pages to get the flow of the writing in your head. In Skagboys he does something even more remarkable, which is to write his different characters with appropriately different accents, reflecting their origin and place in life. I found I carried their voices around in my head during the days of reading Skagboys.
I have listened to interviews with Welsh and it is clear, as I have often heard said, that he is a genuinely decent and incredibly nice guy. Somehow that makes reading him even more pleasurable, for this reader anyway.
Do yourself a favor, and read this book.
Qulcelat
This book is a must read for Welsh fans. If you read the cover, you know how it starts, and if you read or saw Trainspotting, you know how it ends, so it would be hard to give any spoilers even if I were inclined to.

The central story is the decline of Mark Renton, who starts out as a university student with a wonderful girlfriend and a real shot at "getting out" and ends up, well, you know. That theme is compelling, but the book also cycles through vignettes of the other main characters: Sick Boy, Spud, and Begbie, as well as several other peripheral characters. With the exception of Begbie - who is a constant through all three books - they all "fall", but since they don't have as far to fall as Renton, they pretty quickly end up in the state you meet them in Trainspotting. The stories are poignant and well written, but after a while, I did find that they became a bit repetitive, and it became a bit of a slog to get to the end - particularly, as I said, when I knew pretty much what the end was going to be. Personally, I think it would have been more effective if it had been pruned a bit.

Much has been said about the phonetic dialectic writing. I only saw the movie Trainspotting, but if I remember Porno correctly, he only used dialectic writing for some characters (Spud?). In this book, it's most characters. I'm pretty ambivalent about it. I think it adds a bit of flavor, but on the other hand, I would have been happy for him to only use it when someone was talking. Since he used it for everything, I eventually just stopeed noticing.

So definitely well worth reading, but you may find yourself skimming in places.
Gaxaisvem
A fantastic book. All of the sick twisted humor of Acidhouse & Trainspotting, but from a much more mature writer. While three full novels about these characters might have been too much, Welsh writes about them (doing the same stuff), in a more insightful and - dare I say - gentler manner. I had to put this book down several times because it was - by turns - tough, serious and wickedly funny. The novel is also a stinging indictment of the chaos that Thatcher and Heroin inflicted on Scotland in the 1980s.
Maximilianishe
As a Trainspotting and Porno lover, I was eager to read this prequel. Welsh didn't dissapoint me. All of Leith's underworld, exceptional characters (specially Sick Boy) and Schopenhauer and Nietzsche's references live togheter in this beautiful and decadent novel. Even "evil" has an origin, and Rents, Franco, Danny, Tommy and Simon's life in the eighties is specially dark and crude. Everything that seems dark comedy in Trainspotting here looks grim, hopeless, a great critic to Thatcher's policies and a decadent society not only in Scotland but in the world. This is a must read for any Trainspotting fan out there
Kelerana
A bit dark; it is supposed to be funny but if you actually pay attention, it is actually quite depressing. If you are a fan of the Trainspotting books, it is still a good read. Has lightened up on the Scottish vernacular which is a bit of a shame if that is one of the reasons that attracted you to these books.
Manona
I picked this one up having enjoyed first the Trainspotting film, then the book - probably a well trodden path. Skagboys gives a much better picture of the world outside Renton's immediate circle of freinds and acquaintances - probably reflecting the characters greater awareness of the wider world before they become almost entirely consumed by drug use. It's a very interesting window into Thatcher-era Britain. The stories are what you'd expect if you've read Trainspotting - funny, real, brutal, and mostly written in an almost indecipherable scottish dialect. If you aren't familiar with Scots' accents and slang, you might not understand what's going on.
Adrierdin
I'm not gonna lie here. This book is a difficult read for those of us not used to the Scottish dialect. If you're not used to it, this will likely be a bit of a slower read for you. Give it a go anyway, though.
Another fun read from Mr. Welsh. I gave it four stars cause it rocks. The author def knows his material - one of the quotes on heroin use sums it up ("...c**ts that try and psychoanalyse the f***ed-up miss the crucial point: sometimes ye just dae it cause it's thaire n that's wey ye are.") (pg 179)
This book (and his others) are so great because they show us how things were at a specific place (Leith & Edinburgh Scotland) and a specific time and involving a certain group of people. As simple as this sounds, it works wonderfully when mixed with Welsh's use of Scottish slang.
Bottom line - if you liked Trainspotting and Welsh's other novels, you'll love this as well.