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eBook The Infection download

by Craig DiLouie

eBook The Infection download ISBN: 1934861650
Author: Craig DiLouie
Publisher: Permuted Press; First Edition edition (August 30, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 286
ePub: 1503 kb
Fb2: 1359 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mobi lrf lrf rtf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Action and Adventure

On the battlefields of America, even our children will have to fight. The mystery virus struck down millions. Three days later, its victims awoke with a single violent purpose: spread the Infection.

On the battlefields of America, even our children will have to fight. As the world lurched toward the apocalypse, some of the Infected continued to change, transforming into horrific monsters. America’s far-flung military has returned home to wage a horrific war against its own country, engaged in a fierce battle to retake Washington, DC.

Craig DiLouie is the author of the bestselling zombie novels The Infection, Tooth and Nail and The Killing Floor

Craig DiLouie is the author of the bestselling zombie novels The Infection, Tooth and Nail and The Killing Floor. He blogs about horror media regularly at CraigDiLouie. In reading all three of Craig DiLouie's books related to mass infection and a "zombie" like apocalypse, I found them convincing in that they represented very accurate and compelling thought processes and reactions of a military mind dealing with a conflict of this type.

Craig DiLouie is an author of popular thriller, apocalyptic/horror, and sci-fi/fantasy fiction. Each book promises an exciting experience with people you’ll care about in a world that feels real. He is a member of the HWA, SFWA, International Thriller Writers, and IFWA.

Year Published: 1997. The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Year Published: 2012. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Dilouie Craig - скачать бесплатно все книги автора. Книги 1-2 из 2. The Killing Floor. Two hundred miles away, Ray Young, survivor of a fight to save a refugee camp from hordes of Infected fleeing the burning ruins of Pittsburgh, awakes from a coma to learn he has also survived Infection. But this is no miracle.

Three days later, its victims awake with a single purpose: spread the Infection.

Author: Craig DiLouie. Publisher: Permuted Press, Jonesboro, 2011. Five ordinary people must pay the price of survival at the end of the world. A mysterious virus suddenly strikes down millions. Three days later, its victims awake with a single purpose: spread the Infection. As the world lurches toward the apocalypse, some of the Infected continue to change, transforming into horrific monsters. In one American city, a small group struggles to survive.

Автовоспроизведение Если функция включена, то следующий ролик начнет воспроизводиться автоматически.

He is still exhausted but his body is telling him he has already overslept. You’re still here, Todd old man, he tells himself. les blearily to a bucket in the corner and empties his bladder. Outside, he finds Paul in the hallway, whistling as he mops the floor with a strong bleach solution. He finds the sight reassuring. He is not used to being alone. Wow, we just got here and they got you mopping floors already

In THE KILLING FLOOR, Craig DiLouie’s chilling apocalyptic vision portrayed in THE INFECTION continues, presenting a nightmarish struggle for survival like no. .The Infection - Craig Dilouie.

In THE KILLING FLOOR, Craig DiLouie’s chilling apocalyptic vision portrayed in THE INFECTION continues, presenting a nightmarish struggle for survival like no other. A high octane, nail biter of a zombie novel. Craig DiLouie is one of the new masters in zombie fiction. Jonathan Maberry, New York Times bestselling author of DEAD OF NIGHT and ROT & RUIN. Action so thrilling you can’t help but get lost in DiLouie's nightmares. -Joe McKinney, Bram Stoker Award-winning author of FLESH EATERS.

Five ordinary people must pay the price of survival at the end of the world.A mysterious virus suddenly strikes down millions. Three days later, its victims awake with a single purpose: spread the Infection. As the world lurches toward the apocalypse, some of the Infected continue to change, transforming into horrific monsters. In one American city, a small group struggles to survive. Sarge, a tank commander hardened by years of fighting in Afghanistan. Wendy, a cop still fighting for law and order in a lawless land. Ethan, a teacher searching for his lost family. Todd, a high school student who sees second chances in the end of the world. Paul, a minister who wonders why God has forsaken his children. And Anne, their mysterious leader, who holds an almost fanatical hatred for the Infected. Together, they fight their way to a massive refugee camp where thousands have made a stand. There, what's left of the government will ask them to accept a mission that will determine the survival of them all--a dangerous journey back onto the open road and into the very heart of Infection.
Comments: (7)
Rollers from Abdun
The zombie craze still shows no signs of abating (it can't be killed!) and this, coupled with the explosion of self-publishing in recent years, means just one thing: a lot of crappy zombie novels glutting the market. I've been burned many, many times by sub-par fiction in this genre, and I can't even count the number of times I've backed away shaking my head after reading free previews.

I'm happy to report that Craig DiLouie is a cut above the rest and delivers a solid and entertaining tale. The prose style is workmanlike, but very readable, and he is able to paint characters that, while they adhere to particular archetypes, are sympathetic and interesting. I particularly enjoyed Wendy and Todd. The action scenes are also great, and deliver real excitement, with the book's climactic set piece being a standout.

The book is not perfect. There are rather glaring structural issues - jumping back and forth chronologically damaged the pacing of the early book and only occasionally paid off. The flashback chapters aren't bad, but they definitely break up the flow of the story. There's also the occasional tense change issue or typo, but far fewer than you usually see in the genre. Give it a try.
Rich Vulture
I was a little disappointed when I started this book, because I really wanted it to be another story in the same universe as the great 'Tooth and Nail'. However, I quickly became engrossed in the story and this new variation on the Zombie plague and completely forgot my initial complaints.

I've seen other reviews reference Steven King's 'The Mist', and there is some of the same nightmarish feel in the story. However, at its core it's the story of a small group of people escaping Philadelphia during the first weeks of a Zombie uprising. The story is at its most compelling when dealing with details: the characters mulling the meaning of notes to other survivors left in a shelter; the internal debate of a police officer deciding whether to confront a heavily armed group of bandits on herown; the million little things lost in the fall of civilization.

I found the slow unveiling of each character's backstory to be an effective plot device, as it radically adjusted my view of some of the characters as their origins were revealed,

The book could have used a little more editing, but the story is so well plotted that even a nit-picker such as myself could hardly care.

This story dovetails nicely with the sequel, which I think is even better.

If you enjoy stories like "The Walking Dead" or survival horror in general I recommend you give this one a try. I'm looking forward to more from this author.
hardy
I'm not sure of the structure of this book, if there is one, but the text itself is worth reading. The author imagines the entire process of living through a pandemic, making one's way to a government camp, etc. (I'm only halfway through the story at this point.) There is lots of good detail and a nice mix of characters. I find myself wanting to know how they fare as time goes on.

As always, I despair at the state of the editing profession. The author uses phrases like '"off of" (which appears at least twice) and to switch tenses in mid-paragraph. Simple editing should have caught such egregious missteps. Also, in the Kindle edition at least, the table of contents is useless.

I probably would buy another book by this author.

By the way, although this book comes up when one searches for "28 Days Later," the book plot is entirely different to that of the movie. Perhaps the sequel book, "The Killing Floor," is closer to the movie content; I don't know.

This book actually reminds me more of Stephen King's short story, "The Mist."
Uthergo
If you enjoy the zombie genre and or the apocalypse genre give this one a read. Was a good fast paced read that had me wanting more. Looking forward to the sequel. As for the few reviewers that complained that this book jumps around from main story to flashbacks and got annoyed so you have it 1 star reviews,I'm guessing you haven't read much of this genre...because most of the ones I've read do that. Any who...if you're a fan of the genres give it a read. Was quite enjoyable.
Umrdana
I'll start by saying that I really liked that fact that the the infected in this story are not the classic 'arisen dead' zombies. That, for me, earned this one 3 stars instead of two. The writing was decent, and the resaearch behind the story was pretty good. However, some of the characters were completely unbelievable and took me out of the story every time they appeared. Seriously, an obnoxious, busybody PTA housewife that directly causes the death of her husband and kids becomes, almost overnight, an enigmatic, 'Lara Croft' type heoine that is, inexplicably, a crack shot with a rifle and a natural leader of people.
I will also say that the extraordinarily weird monsters that appear well into the story seem like a pasted on afterthought. They are a jarring addition to the story that adds very little except for an amped up weirdness factor.
Malaunitly
In reading all three of Craig DiLouie's books related to mass infection and a "zombie" like apocalypse, I found them convincing in that they represented very accurate and compelling thought processes and reactions of a military mind dealing with a conflict of this type. Myself being former military, and then 34 years as a peace officer, the logistical difficulties, technology, tactics, weapons as well as the morale and ethical dilemma's were very valid and well described, bringing me into the moment. They are a fast read and I found them to be "page turners", with characters you care about and connect with. The consistent problem with series types books for me is there never seems to be a plausible end or major gains for the central problem or for those struggling to over come it. They always drag on and on with no foreseeable conclusion. DiLouie sees to be trying to break that mold by giving the stories real goals and accomplishments. I am looking forward to the next installment.