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by Peter O'Donnell

eBook The Xanadu Talisman (Modesty Blaise series) download ISBN: 028563643X
Author: Peter O'Donnell
Publisher: Souvenir Press; Revised ed. edition (September 1, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 290
ePub: 1413 kb
Fb2: 1920 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: azw doc lit docx
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Action and Adventure

Modesty Blaise is an fiction novel by Peter O'Donnell first published in 1965, featuring the character Modesty Blaise which O'Donnell had created for a comic strip in 1963.

Modesty Blaise is an fiction novel by Peter O'Donnell first published in 1965, featuring the character Modesty Blaise which O'Donnell had created for a comic strip in 1963. This was the first novel to feature the character of Modesty Blaise and her right-hand-man, Willie Garvin. The series of books (all written by O'Donnell) ran concurrently with the comic strip until 1996 (the comic strip ran until 2001).

Peter O'Donnell began his career working on several major pre-war comics, Tiger Tim, Chips and Captain Moonlight. The strip led to a series of bestselling novels about Modesty and her faithful lieutenant, Willie Garvin, all published by Souvenir Press: Modesty Blaise, Sabre Tooth, I, Lucifer, The Impossible Virgin, Pieces of Modesty, A Taste for Death, The Silver Mistress, Dragon's Claw, The Xanadu Talisman, The Night of the Morningstar, Dead Man's Handle, and his most recent collection Cobra Trap.

The Xanadu Talisman book.

Peter O'Donnell - Modesty Blaise 09 - The Xandau Talisman. Modesty Blaise rested a hand on his forehead and said reassuringly, as if to a child, " Ne t'inquiet pas. Je 1'ai, je 1'ai. Chapter 1. The Frenchman huddled beside her was unconscious again. He mumbled for a few moments, then relapsed into silence.

O'Donnell, Peter - Modesty Blaise - The Xanadu Talisman. O'Donnell, Peter - Modesty Blaise - The Xanadu Talisman. Epub FB2 PDF mobi txt. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. 627 Kb. O'Donnell, Peter - Modesty Blaise 01 - Modesty Blaise.

Modesty Blaise is a British comic strip featuring a fictional character of the same name, created by author Peter O'Donnell and illustrator Jim Holdaway in 1963. The strip follows Modesty Blaise, an exceptional young woman with many talents and a criminal past, and her trusty sidekick Willie Garvin. It was adapted into films in 1966, 1982, and 2003, and from 1965 onwards eleven novels and two short story collections were written.

Modesty Blaise Books. 1965 1 Modesty Blaise 1966 2 Sabre-Tooth 1967 3 I, Lucifer 1969 4 A Taste for Death (not to be confused with P. D. James') 1971 5 The Impossible Virgin 1972 6 Pieces of Modesty (short stories) 1973 7 The Silver Mistress 1976 8 Last Days in Limbo 1978 9 Dragon's Claw 1981 10 The Xanadu Talisman 1982 11. The Night of Morningstar 1985 12 Dead Man's Handle 1996 13 Cobra Trap. Movie: 1966 Modesty Blaise (starring Monica Vitti). 199? Miramax is reportedly considering to do a new MB movie.

The Xanadu Talisman is the title of an novel by Peter O'Donnell that was first published in 1981, featuring the character Modesty Blaise. This was the tenth book to feature the character. It was first published in the United Kingdom by Souvenir Press. But in the world of Modesty Blaise, who is? She and her two young charges, Jeremy and Dominic Silk, have made themselves the most potent underworld force in North Africa.

Dramatisation of the novel "Modesty Blaise - A Taste For Death". Sir Gerald Tarrant tempts Modesty out of retirement and into a job involving a young woman with extra sensory powers, an exotic desert location, and a larger than life public school villain, intent on murdering his way to a vast fortune

In this classic return we see Modesty both at her most feminine and at her toughest. Trapped in an earthquake disaster with a dying man, she makes a promise that is to lead her and her faithful friend Willie Garvin into the most perilous crisis of their careers. Their quest takes them from Tangier to Paris, from the Riviera to Corsica, and finally to a stronghold in the heart of the Atlas Mountains, their every move observed and manipulated by El Mico, the most notorious and dangerous criminal genius in the Mediterranean. Unknown to Modesty, she holds a secret that El Mico covets above all else, and she is brought to a final confrontation with death in the stronghold of Xanadu. As in all the Modesty Blaise stories, this book is peopled with a host of eccentric characters: the engaging Dr. Giles Pennyfeather, Modesty’s devoted friend, and her opponents Little Krell, a prodigy in combat, the Silk brothers, juvenile adults who deal in death, and the astonishing Nanny Prendergast.
Comments: (7)
Morlurne
I got this from the library and then decided to purchase it as it was that good. I just LOVED the character of Giles Pennyfeather, especially when he tells Modesty to pay attention as he's explaining that something might be in the basement even though he doesn't even know a basement exists. I also like the "twist" at the end and just the level of humor in this volume. Some of the others (okay, many of the others in this series) just became too ludicrous, but not this one. I also liked the twin villains and the nanny -- just a great book with great characters.
Yainai
Modesty Blaise series is fast paced, something is going to happen, just happened or happening now, unique characters are complete, bigger than life and fun. I have the entire series and wish for more. I prefer the novels, but even the 'graphic art' books of the strips are interesting and fun.
Phenade
I wanted the paperback shown here but instead received a magazine sized book with very large print which will not fit in my bookcase standing up!
Daigrel
Peter O'Donnell did it again he creates sinnister villans and then figures out how to defeat them. Escapism at its best.
Alsath
old fan i liked it. full of twists and turns and ups and downs good book just what i expected
post_name
Modesty Blaise #10: “The Xanadu Talisman” by Peter O’Donnell. Waiting in a hotel on the outskirts of Tangiers to meet Gills Penefeather, an earthquake destroys the hotel, falling on top of Modesty Blaise. She is temporarily safe in the oil pit in the basement with an injured Frenchman. While waiting to be rescued she treats the man’s injuries and he gives her a talisman, and mutters in delirium about a secret, asking her to deliver the talisman to his brother. They are rescued by Willie Garvin and his men, and the Frenchman is taken to her estate nearby to recover. During his recovery he is murdered by El Mico, a notorious gang that replaced The Network after Modesty Blaise retired. A desire to fulfill the dead man’s wishes, she takes the talisman to his brother, then delves more deeper into the mystery of the talisman and El Mico, and it all comes to an end at Xanadu. Modesty Blaise is pitted against two karate experts in an arena, then tied to a post. A panther is released in the pit with only Willie Garvin to protect her, and must kill the panther. This was a lot of fun, as usual, and the El Mico gang turned out to be typical villains in the series, but with a little bit of a twist in the ending.
Arihelm
Once again a great Modesty Blaise book marred by a major flaw.

"The Xanadu Talisman" is the tenth book in the Modesty Blaise series of books, and was written by Peter O'Donnell in 1981, i.e., 16 years after he had started the series with "Modesty Blaise" in 1965. By now the series was well established and very popular, with a large number of fans (including myself) waiting impatiently for each new book.

Unfortunately, by this time the series was on a slow downwards trend - my rating for each of the first seven books is four or five stars, while books eight, nine and ten only get three stars each. This is because there were two problems that were becoming more and more pronounced with the later books in the series: a repetitiveness in the basic plots and the way in which the bad guys were becoming less scary and invincible, and more weird and silly.

In this book, like most of the books in the series, Modesty and her loyal sidekick Willie Garvin encounter some nasty bad guys. Modesty and Willie get captured, and then, through their ingenuity and incredible fighting skills, they break out of imprisonment and win several battles against the bad guys.

The story in "The Xanadu Talisman" is quite good, sufficiently complicated to keep you guessing for a while. There are also several sub-plots that come together in a satisfying way, and a couple of interesting twists in the last three chapters. To avoid revealing too much I'll just say that a stolen (and re-stolen) treasure of immense value is involved as well as the kidnapping of a young English woman.

Much of the action occurs in and around Morocco. A wealthy Arab sheikh, Prince Rahim Mohajeri Azhari of Saudi Arabia, has built an isolated palace high in the Atlas Mountains. This is Xanadu, and it is here that the climax of the story occurs.

Unfortunately, Prince Rahim is not the top bad guy. (The book would have been better if he was.) Instead, the top bad guys are Nanny Pendergast and two young brothers, Jeremy and Dominic Silk. It turns out that Jeremy and Dominic were left in the care of Nanny Pendergast at a young age, and grew up being trained by their nanny to become top criminals and martial artists. Sounds crazy? I agree. No matter how deadly Peter O'Donnell portrays this trio they still come across as totally ridiculous, and this is an irreparable weakness in the book. A good thriller needs some really formidable bad guys, like the ones who populated the first five Modesty books, not wimps like the Silk brothers and their nanny.

On the plus side I can mention that Modesty and Willie have finally given up smoking, and that this book has a clever humorous ending, instead of the sugar-sweet endings of some of the previous books in the series.

I'll complete this review by explaining the quote that I used on the subject line, "Was bad combat move. Better I take Arab first ... he have submachine gun." (page 276) This can go down as "famous last words", having been uttered by one of the protagonists just before dying. In the heat of the final battle he found himself confronted by two enemies and chose to shoot the one he personally hated instead of the one who was more heavily armed. Bad combat move.

Recommended, but do yourself a favor and start reading the series from the start. The first six-seven books are the best.

Rennie Petersen
This later entry in the Modesty & Willie saga really delivers-- the second half is almost all action, and the plot is never too kooky to spur active disbelief. The early clue will be deciphered by history buffs, but it's satisfying for all that. We also learn more about Modesty's beginnings, and her first murder-- in self-defense, but traumatic for all that.

Straight-ahead entertainment at its best.
I got this from the library and then decided to purchase it as it was that good. I just LOVED the character of Giles Pennyfeather, especially when he tells Modesty to pay attention as he's explaining that something might be in the basement even though he doesn't even know a basement exists. I also like the "twist" at the end and just the level of humor in this volume. Some of the others (okay, many of the others in this series) just became too ludicrous, but not this one. I also liked the twin villains and the nanny -- just a great book with great characters.
Modesty Blaise series is fast paced, something is going to happen, just happened or happening now, unique characters are complete, bigger than life and fun. I have the entire series and wish for more. I prefer the novels, but even the 'graphic art' books of the strips are interesting and fun.
I wanted the paperback shown here but instead received a magazine sized book with very large print which will not fit in my bookcase standing up!
Peter O'Donnell did it again he creates sinnister villans and then figures out how to defeat them. Escapism at its best.
old fan i liked it. full of twists and turns and ups and downs good book just what i expected
Modesty Blaise #10: “The Xanadu Talisman” by Peter O’Donnell. Waiting in a hotel on the outskirts of Tangiers to meet Gills Penefeather, an earthquake destroys the hotel, falling on top of Modesty Blaise. She is temporarily safe in the oil pit in the basement with an injured Frenchman. While waiting to be rescued she treats the man’s injuries and he gives her a talisman, and mutters in delirium about a secret, asking her to deliver the talisman to his brother. They are rescued by Willie Garvin and his men, and the Frenchman is taken to her estate nearby to recover. During his recovery he is murdered by El Mico, a notorious gang that replaced The Network after Modesty Blaise retired. A desire to fulfill the dead man’s wishes, she takes the talisman to his brother, then delves more deeper into the mystery of the talisman and El Mico, and it all comes to an end at Xanadu. Modesty Blaise is pitted against two karate experts in an arena, then tied to a post. A panther is released in the pit with only Willie Garvin to protect her, and must kill the panther. This was a lot of fun, as usual, and the El Mico gang turned out to be typical villains in the series, but with a little bit of a twist in the ending.
Once again a great Modesty Blaise book marred by a major flaw.

"The Xanadu Talisman" is the tenth book in the Modesty Blaise series of books, and was written by Peter O'Donnell in 1981, i.e., 16 years after he had started the series with "Modesty Blaise" in 1965. By now the series was well established and very popular, with a large number of fans (including myself) waiting impatiently for each new book.

Unfortunately, by this time the series was on a slow downwards trend - my rating for each of the first seven books is four or five stars, while books eight, nine and ten only get three stars each. This is because there were two problems that were becoming more and more pronounced with the later books in the series: a repetitiveness in the basic plots and the way in which the bad guys were becoming less scary and invincible, and more weird and silly.

In this book, like most of the books in the series, Modesty and her loyal sidekick Willie Garvin encounter some nasty bad guys. Modesty and Willie get captured, and then, through their ingenuity and incredible fighting skills, they break out of imprisonment and win several battles against the bad guys.

The story in "The Xanadu Talisman" is quite good, sufficiently complicated to keep you guessing for a while. There are also several sub-plots that come together in a satisfying way, and a couple of interesting twists in the last three chapters. To avoid revealing too much I'll just say that a stolen (and re-stolen) treasure of immense value is involved as well as the kidnapping of a young English woman.

Much of the action occurs in and around Morocco. A wealthy Arab sheikh, Prince Rahim Mohajeri Azhari of Saudi Arabia, has built an isolated palace high in the Atlas Mountains. This is Xanadu, and it is here that the climax of the story occurs.

Unfortunately, Prince Rahim is not the top bad guy. (The book would have been better if he was.) Instead, the top bad guys are Nanny Pendergast and two young brothers, Jeremy and Dominic Silk. It turns out that Jeremy and Dominic were left in the care of Nanny Pendergast at a young age, and grew up being trained by their nanny to become top criminals and martial artists. Sounds crazy? I agree. No matter how deadly Peter O'Donnell portrays this trio they still come across as totally ridiculous, and this is an irreparable weakness in the book. A good thriller needs some really formidable bad guys, like the ones who populated the first five Modesty books, not wimps like the Silk brothers and their nanny.

On the plus side I can mention that Modesty and Willie have finally given up smoking, and that this book has a clever humorous ending, instead of the sugar-sweet endings of some of the previous books in the series.

I'll complete this review by explaining the quote that I used on the subject line, "Was bad combat move. Better I take Arab first ... he have submachine gun." (page 276) This can go down as "famous last words", having been uttered by one of the protagonists just before dying. In the heat of the final battle he found himself confronted by two enemies and chose to shoot the one he personally hated instead of the one who was more heavily armed. Bad combat move.

Recommended, but do yourself a favor and start reading the series from the start. The first six-seven books are the best.

Rennie Petersen
This later entry in the Modesty & Willie saga really delivers-- the second half is almost all action, and the plot is never too kooky to spur active disbelief. The early clue will be deciphered by history buffs, but it's satisfying for all that. We also learn more about Modesty's beginnings, and her first murder-- in self-defense, but traumatic for all that.

Straight-ahead entertainment at its best.