carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Hell and Gone (Charlie Hardie #2)

eBook Hell and Gone (Charlie Hardie #2) download

by Duane Swierczynski

eBook Hell and Gone (Charlie Hardie #2) download ISBN: 0316133299
Author: Duane Swierczynski
Publisher: Mulholland Books; 1 edition (October 31, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 286
ePub: 1736 kb
Fb2: 1312 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mobi rtf lit docx
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Action and Adventure

And getting there is a blast, because no matter what, "Hell & Gone" is a Duane Swierczynski book, and few writers today can match Swierczynski when it comes to plot. You will HAVE to turn that page.

And getting there is a blast, because no matter what, "Hell & Gone" is a Duane Swierczynski book, and few writers today can match Swierczynski when it comes to plot. You will WANT to know what the hell's going on.

Hell & Gone book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Hell & Gone (Charlie Hardie, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Charlie Hardie - 2 ). Duane Swierczynski. The second of three high-energy thrillers arriving back-to-back from cult crime fiction sensation Duane Swierczynski. Left for dead after an epic shootout that blew the lid off a billion-dollar conspiracy, ex-cop Charlie Hardie quickly realizes that when you're dealing with The Accident People, things can get worse. Drugged, bound and transported by strange operatives of unknown origin, Hardie awakens to find himself captive in a secret prison that houses the most dangerous criminals on earth

Hell and Gone ch-2 (Charlie Hardie Duane Swierczynski. Year Published: 1999. Welcome to Gray City. The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device.

Hell and Gone ch-2 (Charlie Hardie Duane Swierczynski. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Hell & Gone (Charlie Hardie, by Duane Swierczynski. Narrated by Pete Larkin. Drugged, bound and transported by strange operatives of unknown origin, Hardie awakens to find himself captive in a secret prison that houses the most dangerous criminals on earth. And then things get really bad.

Praise for Hell and Gone: Charlie’s internal voice is fun to follow and the . Someone is pressing the buttons in this prison that Charlie Hardie finds himself in and playing one against another.

Praise for Hell and Gone: Charlie’s internal voice is fun to follow and the action sequences are killer. I could easily see these books as a major summer blockbuste. he book goes from action to action, rarely stopping to catch a breath and I stayed up late one night turning the pages to the en. f non-stop, cool action sequences with fun characters are your thing, you need to read some Swierczynski stories. Duane Swierczynski has ideas so brilliant and brutal that one day the rest of us will have to tool up and kill him. -Warren Ellis.

Hell & High Water, . Part of THIRDS series by Charlie Cochet. Finally, he was home. He stuck the key into the lock, turned it, and pushed the door open, baffled when it went thump halfway. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26. Dex frowned, trying to drum up what he remembered from the incident. But since Gabe had been a THIRDS agent, the HPF had no jurisdiction. I thought the guy involved had been a Human informant? Pearce shook his head. Christ, now what? Something heavy was wedged up against it.

The second of three high-energy thrillers arriving back-to-back from cult crime fiction sensation Duane Swierczynski.

And even though he thought Charlie Hardie was kind of a dick, he also knew Hardie wasn’t capable of something like this. Deke told the liaison so, added: I talked to Charlie Hardie earlier today. He said was trying to keep Lane Madden safe from people who were trying to kill her. Did he say who these people were? the liaison asked.

The second of three high-energy thrillers arriving back-to-back from cult crime fiction sensation Duane Swierczynski.Left for dead after an epic shootout that blew the lid off a billion-dollar conspiracy, ex-cop Charlie Hardie quickly realizes that when you're dealing with The Accident People, things can get worse. Drugged, bound and transported by strange operatives of unknown origin, Hardie awakens to find himself captive in a secret prison that houses the most dangerous criminals on earth.And then things get really bad. Because this isn't just any prison. It's a Kafkaesque nightmare that comes springloaded with a brutal catch-22: Hardie's the warden. And any attempt to escape triggers a "death mechanism" that will kill everyone down here--including a group of innocent guards. Faced with an unworkable paradox, and knowing that his wife and son could be next on the Accident People's hit list, Hardie has only one choice: fight his way to the heart of this hell hole and make a deal with the Devil himself.
Comments: (7)
Goltizuru
Swierczynski has cranked out title after title of great taut, noirish thrillers. I agree that he is a writer to follow. I liked Fun & Games (Charlie Hardie # 1) so much I read it twice. As a character, Hardie reads like an homage to John McClane of the Die Hard movies: an anti-hero whose only "super power" is stubbornly failing to notice that he's been beaten, so he keeps going. Rooting for this underdog character is tons of fun.

Hell & Gone is billed as a sequel -- in fact, the middle of a trilogy involving Charlie Hardie. My problem is that with Hell & Gone, Swierczynski takes a hairpin turn and zooms away from the genre that brought us here (thriller/action). Instead, he offers a brutal horror story instead, showing a dash of influence from the Saw movies. Though his previous books maintained a breathtaking pace and wild action, they still seemed grounded enough to be somewhat plausible. Hell & Gone veers off into wildly implausible territory, populated with cardboard characters burdened with ridiculous backstories. Where his previous novels read like books that would make good movies, this edition reads like the novelization of a sub-par comic book. As it turns out, Swierczynski does indeed write comic books, forcing me to wonder if this work originated as a comic book script that was rejected. The "plot twists" land with the appalling splat of the last three M. Night Shyamalan movies. You can see them coming by merely picturing the least likely, most absurd thing that he could assert.

Where other Swierczynski books have offered fresh takes on classic genres such as heist stories or revenge stories, the central premise of Hell & Gone is based on a well-known social experiment from the 1960s. Revisiting it in depth struck me as a tired idea.

I still love Swierczynski's prose style. I think Charlie Hardie is a terrific character. Duane is still a writer to watch. But even as his fan, I have to caution readers: Hell & Gone is far from Duane Swierczynski at his best. Lower expectations before reading.
Lucam
"All human evil comes from a single cause - man's inability to sit still in a room."

The wait is over, and "Hell and Gone," the middle of the trilogy that started with July's deliciously warped "Fun and Games," is on the street. Not that more evidence is needed, but Duane Swierczynski is firmly established as the unconventional creative genius of pop thriller fiction: hip, irreverent, and unconventional - Charles Bukowski for a generation consumed less with anger than with entertainment.

"Hell and Gone" starts with the prologue of spoiled sorority girl Julie Lippman tracking down her missing boyfriend. Fast forward sixteen years, and we pick up where "Fun and Games" left off - kind of - with a battered and broken Charlie Hardy being whisked away, barely alive, in the type of ambulance who'd expect to find on the Styx. It goes from there to Kafkaesque surrealism as Hardy finds himself "warden" in an aging and decrepit underground prison with a handful of iron-masked inmates held in cages by a sadistic team of Nazi-attired guards. Hardy, virtually crippled with a bullet-damaged arm and leg, stumbles through a pair of mazes: one physical in trying to escape from apparently inescapable confines, the other psychological in figuring out where he is, exactly who put him there, and why. Time loses meaning but Hardy, focused on escaping to insure his wife and son are protected, manages - barely - to maintain his sanity despite the mind-twisting enigma of the guards and their wards, and violence that makes even "Fun and Games" look like Sesame Street. Without giving too much away, trust that Hardy's house sitting disaster of "Fun and Games," Julie Lippman's mysterious opening chapter, and Hardy's incarceration knit nicely together in a climax that sets up Swierczynski's final episode, "Point and Shoot," due in March.

"Hell and Gone" is a classic from the guy who dreams up off-beat fare like "Secret Dead Men," "The Blond," and "Severance Package" - a lurid light speed-paced romp through a parallel plane making all other black helicopter-themed plots look playfull. Swiercynski is a talented writer who so evidently enjoys his craft - will be tough having to wait till March to wrap this one up.
Aloo
I loved the first Charlie Hardie book, "Fun & Games" and was looking forward to "Hell & Gone" with great anticipation. I got it. I read it. I hated it. I loved it. In short, "Hell & Gone" is not at all what I was expecting, and I hated it for that. The first book is a rough and tumble non-stop hard-boiled noirish action fest. Since it ends on a cliffhanger, one would expect the next book to carry on. But Swierczynski has different plans. Just as "the Industry" keeps Charlie Hardie off balance and guessing, Swierczynski does the same with his readers. "Hell & Gone" seems to be a riff on the famous (infamous?) 1971 Stanford Prison Experiment. But of course, it has a Swierczynski twist. Charlie finds himself a prisoner of "the Industry" in a very unique prison where neither he, nor the reader, can ever be quite certain what's going on. At times, "Hell & Gone" seems more like dystopian science fiction than a crime novel. Still, this is a Charlie Hardie story and Charlie has no intention of staying in prison, so before the end of this installment, we find ourselves back in more familiar territory. And getting there is a blast, because no matter what, "Hell & Gone" is a Duane Swierczynski book, and few writers today can match Swierczynski when it comes to plot. You will HAVE to turn that page. You will WANT to know what the hell's going on. Or try to know. And when it's all over, you may be scratching your head wondering what's coming in the next volume, "Point & Shoot." And that's why I ultimately loved "Hell & Gone." Despite being so different from "Fun & Games," it drew me in and pulled me along at a break-neck pace. It played with my head and kept me guessing at every turn. And just like the first book, it left me eager to find out what happens next.