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eBook The Rescue download

by Joseph Conrad

eBook The Rescue download ISBN: 1604594047
Author: Joseph Conrad
Publisher: Wilder Publications (March 26, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 300
ePub: 1946 kb
Fb2: 1110 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: azw lrf mobi txt
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Action and Adventure

The Rescue, A Romance of the Shallows (1920) is one of Joseph Conrad's works contained in what is now sometimes called the Lingard Trilogy, a group of novels based on Conrad's experience as mate on the steamer Vidar

The Rescue, A Romance of the Shallows (1920) is one of Joseph Conrad's works contained in what is now sometimes called the Lingard Trilogy, a group of novels based on Conrad's experience as mate on the steamer Vidar. Although it was the last of the three novels to be published, after Almayer's Folly (1895) and An Outcast of the Islands (1896), the events related in the novel precede those

This book is one of the classic book of all time. The Rescue: A Romance of the Shallows by Joseph Conrad.

This book is one of the classic book of all time. Actions & Adventure.

By Joseph Conrad The truth is that when "The Rescue" was laid aside it was not laid asidein despair.

Allas!' quod she, 'that ever this sholde happe! For wende I never,by possibilitee, That swich a monstre or merveille mighte be!'-THEFRANKELEYN'S TALE. To frederic courtland penfield last ambassador of the united states ofamerica to the late austrian empire, this old time tale is gratefullyinscribed in memory of the rescue of certain distressed travellerseffected by him in the world's great storm of the year 1914. The truth is that when "The Rescue" was laid aside it was not laid asidein despair.

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Rescue, by Joseph Conrad. This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with. almost no restrictions whatsoever.

He talked of his youth surrounded by the fury of fanaticism and war, of battles on the hills, of advances through the forests, of men's unswerving piety, of their unextinguishable hate. wandering cloud obscured the gentle splendour of the rectangular patch of starlight framed in the opaque blackness of the hut. Belarab murmured on of a succession of reverses, of the ring of disasters narrowing round men's fading hopes and undiminished courage.

I’ve read pretty much everything else he wrote but for some reason I had overlooked this one.

He was born Jozef Konrad Nalecz Korzeniowski on December 3, 1857, in the Polish Ukraine. His father, a writer and translator, was from Polish nobility, but political activity against Russian oppression led to his exile. Conrad was orphaned at a young age and subsequently raised by his uncle. At 17 he went to sea, an experience that shaped the bleak view of human nature which he expressed in his fiction.

The Rescue: A Romance of the Shallows by Joseph Conrad.

Dark allegory describes the narrator's journey up the Congo River and his meeting with, and fascination by, Mr. Kurtz, a mysterious personage who dominates the unruly inhabitants of the region. Masterly blend of adventure, character development, psychological penetration.

The Rescue was originally published in 1920; it concludes what is sometimes referred to as The Lingard Trilogy, a group of novels based on Conrad's experience as mate on the steamer, Vidar. Although it was the last of the three novels to be published, after Almayer's Folly (1895) and An Outcast of the Islands (1896), the events related in the novel precede those. The Rescue is a tersely written adventure novel with all the power and scope one would expect from Joseph Conrad.
Comments: (7)
Cordanius
All the good stuff! The stuff you love to read! I can't for the life of me imagine why The Rescue isn't one of Conrad's most popular books. It's a nail-biting suspense story, told in his most straightforward 'external narrative' mode rather than in the complexly layered twice-told first-person fallible-narrator manner of Lord Jim or Chance. The latter novel, Chance, is hugely more obscure and ambiguous than The Rescue -- more syntactically challenging also -- yet it was Conrad's best seller.

The Rescue is Conrad's most overt portrayal of manly virtue, of courage. Tom Lingard - Rajah Laut, the King of the Sea - is Conrad's Homeric hero, his Achilles or Ajax, and as such a tragic figure, since heroism for Conrad can only be tragic. Lingard's invulnerability is inevitably his downfall, as each of the people he anoints with his trust fail him utterly and fatally. [This, by the way, is the sort of review for people who have already read the book or who already consider Conrad a great writer. I don't intend to summarize the plot for anyone.]

The Rescue is above all a love story, a "romance" on the model of chivalric romances of the Middle Ages... an unconsummated, unimaginable love like that of Lancelot and Guinevere. For Conrad, such consuming passion also can only be tragic. Neither Lingard nor Mrs. Travers will ever recover from the searing 'spiritual' intimacy of their encounter. They sail apart in the end into emotionally disrupted futures.

The Rescue is also Conrad's most overt expression of class consciousness, of his fierce disdain for and resentment of the upper classes, the 'better' people, typified by the insufferable narcissist Mr. Travers. It's impossible not to read Tom Lingard's hatred of the Victorian ruling class as expressive of Conrad's own bitter condemnation of them; in fact, it's hard to recall that Conrad was NOT a working class Briton. Perhaps by 1920, when The Rescue was published, Conrad himself had forgotten that he didn't grow up oppressed by the rigid class prejudices of his adopted country. The Traverses are, for Lingard and his author, superfluous parasites, emotionally sterile, incapable of real life, people who "leave no footprints" as the wise Malay savages say. Mrs. Lingard is the most unhappy heroine in literature, being able to perceive her own and her class's unutterable spiritual worthlessness yet not able to escape it.

Happy endings, if you've never read a Conrad novel, are not to be expected. The joys of reading Conrad are dark, ferocious joys, which come to the reader who lets herself/himself drown in the passions of the characters, who are never simple cartoons. Each character in The Rescue, from the third-rate first mate to the aloof artistic voyeur on the yacht to the murderous Malay pirate chief, is completely autonomous and self-defining... and therefore interesting, and potentially an agent of fate. The beauties of Conrad's descriptive prose are also a joy for the reader. No one describes the ominous silence of a tropic forest or the raptures of a falling tide more affectively than Conrad, for whom all things inanimate were alive with significance.

I can't begin to suggest a hierarchy of quality for Conrad's novels. Read them all, and be grateful.
Reggy
Interesting if stylistically and thematically confused. Conrad does have an engaging literary style, but in this novel I felt that he got lost in a jumble of his own making, the threads of his narrative going backwards and forwards and jarring to sudden stops, too often for any kind of flow. His insistence on the use of vast tracts of conversation was fatiguing, especially as he didn't have the skill to carry it off, the flow being rather artificial, if not at times turgidly boring. Also, a point perhaps a little harsh, but I did feel that any message he was trying to get across, (and this being Conrad he was after some meaningful conclusion) was too hazy to make out, which left one with a distinctly unsatisfied feeling.
However, it was engaging, interesting and kept me reading to the end. The characters were strong and well crafted. Each individual had a significant role to play in the plot and their behavior was always true to form. The story was written with a certain skill and a vividness of imagery bringing the world Conrad describes to life. There was a constant sense of urgency, carrying through the story thread to its culmination and the ending was not too dreadfully depressing.
All in all an enjoyable read which did not inspire me with the urgent urge to look up another one of his books.
Akisame
This story is a Joseph Conrad masterpiece that I was lucky enough to not read when younger. I now realize that ripping through a story like this is not a good idea as one misses the exquisite care and craftsmanship the author put into both the complex character development and rich descriptions of the sea and the workings of windships. When young I thought there was an endless supply of great stories like this but in reality the supply is very limited and each needs to be read with great care and savoring just as one would handle any great work of art. I recommend this book to anyone who loves stories that bring the 19th century back to life, to those who love sea stories and to those who love stories of complex characters caught in conflict and moral crisis. In each of these areas of consideration, Conrad is unexcelled.
Ddilonyne
I tried to give this no stars but, alas, kindle won't go below one star. The novel starts well with Conrad's wonted power and incisiveness but degenerates about half-way through into the badness of which Conrad is also capable. It tells the story of the rescue of a British yacht stranded in the shallows by the hero of the novel, Captain Lingard, whom we might know from the earlier novel An Outcast of the Islands. The owner of the British yacht, Mr. Travers, intends studying the Dutch colonial system in the region, but the fate of Mr. Travers and the other people in the yacht lies in the hands of Captain Lingard, an adventurer, the only person capable of delivering the party out the hands of the warlords living on the coast. Mr. Travers objects to Captain Lingard but his wife, Edith, falls in love with him. What occurs is a kind of platonic dalliance between Captain Lingard and Mrs. Travers, at the expense of Mrs. Travers' husband. Mr Travers is a person we have grown used to disliking--race-conscious, class-conscious, patronizing towards women--but one would think he might properly object to the shenanigans conducted by Captain Lingard and his wife, notwithstanding the fact that he has, Conrad is quick to point out, a bald spot in the middle of his hair. In pursuance of this tawdry affair Conrad's writing becomes melodramatically awful. The novel rests on the account of the affair between Captain Lingard and Mrs. Travers and so must in certain respects fail. The other characters--d'Alcacer, Jorgenson, Carter, Shaw--do not have sufficient interest (d'Alcacer is world-weary; Jorgenson represents death) to do anything for this novel.
Makaitist
Not an easy read .... but interesting and very very rewarding ... with all of the cynicism and insight into the colonies, white imperialists, native clans that we love and appreciate Conrad for..
Samuhn
Good book. Condition good